Beauties of Tennyson

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of Beauties of Tennyson, by Alfred Tennyson
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Title: Beauties of Tennyson
Author: Alfred Tennyson
Illustrator: Frederic B. Schell
Release Date: November 23, 2007 [EBook #23597]
Language: English
Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1
*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK BEAUTIES OF TENNYSON ***
Produced by Juliet Sutherland, Janet Blenkinship and the Online Distributed Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.net
LADY CLARA VERE DE VERE.
BEAUTIES
OF
TENNYSON.
20 ILLUSTRATIONS BY
FREDERIC B. SCHELL.
PORTER & COATES, PHILADELPHIA.
Copyright, 1885, By Porter & Coates.
CONTENTS
THE BROOK. SONG FROM "MAUD." A FAREWELL. SONG FROM "MAUD." BREAK, BREAK, BREAK.
FROM LOCKSLEY HALL." " SONG FROM "MAUD." SONG FROM "THE PRINCESS." LILIAN. RING OUT, WILD BELLS. FROM "THE PRINCESS." SONG FROM "THE PRINCESS." FROM "ENOCH ARDEN." FROM "ENOCH ARDEN." THE CHARGE OF THE LIGHT BRIGADE. FROM "THE MAY QUEEN." SONG FROM "THE PRINCESS." FROM "HAROLD." FROM "THE REVENGE."
THE BROOK. I come from haunts of coot and hern, I make sudden sally And sparkle out among the fern, To bicker down a valley. By thirty hills I hurry down, Or slip between the ridges, By twenty thorps, a little town, And half a hundred bridges.
I chatter over stony ways, In little sharps and trebles, I bubble into eddying bays, I babble on the pebbles. With many a curve my banks I fret By many a field and fallow, And many a fairy foreland set With willow-weed and mallow.
And here and there a foamy lake Upon me, as I travel With many a silvery waterbreak Above the golden gravel, And draw them all along, and flow To join the brimming river, For men may come and men may go, But I go on for ever.
Contents
"I CHATTER OVER STONY WAYS, IN LITTLE SHARPS AND TREBLES."
SONG FROM "MAUD."
See what a lovely shell, Small and pure as a pearl, Lying close to my foot, Frail, but a work divine, Made so fairily well With delicate spire and whorl, How exquisitely minute, A miracle of design!
What is it? a learned man Could give it a clumsy name. Let him name it who can, The beauty would be the same.
The tiny cell is forlorn, Void of the little living will That made it stir on the shore. Did he stand at the diamond door Of his house in a rainbow frill? Did he push, when he was uncurl'd, A golden foot or a fairy horn Thro' his dim water-world.
Slight, to be crushed with a tap Of my finger-nail on the sand, Small, but a work divine, Frail, but of force to withstand, Year u on ear the shock
oCtnetns
Of cataract seas that snap The three-decker's oaken spine Athwart the ledges of rock, Here on the Breton strand!
"SEE WHAT A LOVELY SHELL, LYING CLOSE TO MY FOOT."
A FAREWELL.
Flow down, cold rivulet, to the sea, Thy tribute wave deliver: No more by thee my steps shall be, For ever and for ever. Flow, softly flow, by lawn and lea, A rivulet then a river: Nowhere by thee my steps shall be, For ever and for ever. But here will sigh thine alder tree, And here thine aspen shiver; And here by thee will hum the bee, For ever and for ever. A thousand suns will stream on thee, A thousand moons will quiver; But not by thee my steps shall be, For ever and for ever.
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"FLOW DOWN, COLD RIVULET, TO THE SEA."
SONG FROM "MAUD."
Come into the garden, Maud, For the black bat, night, has flown, Come into the garden, Maud, I am here at the gate alone; And the woodbine spices are wafted abroad, And the musk of the roses blown.
For a breeze of morning moves, And the planet of Love is on high, Beginning to faint in the light that she loves On a bed of daffodil sky, To faint in the light of the sun she loves, To faint in his light, and to die.
There has fallen a splendid tear From the passion-flower at the gate. She is coming, my dove, my dear; She is coming, my life, my fate; The red rose cries, "She is near, she is near;" And the white rose weeps, "She is late;" The larkspur listens, "I hear, I hear;" And the lily whispers, "I wait."
She is coming, my own, my sweet; Were it ever so airy a tread, My heart would hear her and beat, Were it earth in an earth bed;
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My dust would hear her and beat, Had I lain for a century dead; Would start and tremble under her feet, And blossom in purple and red.
"THE RED ROSE CRIES, 'SHE IS NEAR, SHE IS NEAR.'"
BREAK, BREAK, BREAK. Break, break, break, On thy cold gray stones, O Sea! And I would that my tongue could utter The thoughts that arise in me. O well for the fisherman's boy, That he shouts with his sister at play! O well for the sailor lad, That he sings in his boat on the bay! And the stately ships go on To their haven under the hill; But O for the touch of a vanish'd hand, And the sound of a voice that is still! Break, break, break, At the foot of thy crags, O Sea! But the tender grace of a day that is dead Will never come back to me.
Contents
"BREAK, BREAK, BREAK, AT THE FOOT OF THY CRAGS, O SEA!"
FROM "LOCKSLEY HALL." Love took up the glass of Time, and turn'd it in his glowing hands; Every moment, lightly shaken, ran itself in golden sands. Love took up the harp of Life, and smote on all the chords with might; Smote the chord of Self, that, trembling, pass'd in music out of sight. Many a morning on the moorland did we hear the copses ring, And her whisper throng'd my pulses with the fulness of the Spring. Many an evening by the waters did we watch the stately ships, And our spirits rush'd together at the touching of the lips. O my cousin, shallow-hearted! O my Amy, mine no more! O the dreary, dreary moorland! O the barren, barren shore!
Contents
"MANY AN EVENING BY THE WATERS DID WE WATCH THE STATELY SHIPS " .
SONG FROM "MAUD."
Go not, happy day, From the shining fields, Go not, happy day, Till the maiden yields. Rosy is the West, Rosy is the South, Roses are her cheeks, And a rose her mouth When the happy Yes Falters from her lips, Pass and blush the news Over glowing ships; Over blowing seas, Over seas at rest, Pass the happy news, Blush it thro' the West; Till the red man dance By his red cedar-tree, And the red man's babe Leap, beyond the sea. Blush from West to East, Blush from East to West, Till the West is East, Blush it thro' the West. Rosy is the West, Rosy is the South, Roses are her cheeks,
Contents
And a rose her mouth.
"GO NOT, HAPPY DAY, TILL THE MAIDEN YIELDS. "
SONG FROM "THE PRINCESS."
Sweet and low, sweet and low, Wind of the western sea, Low, low, breathe and blow, Wind of the western sea! Over the rolling waters go, Come from the dying moon, and blow, Blow him again to me; While my little one, while my pretty one, sleeps. Sleep and rest, sleep and rest, Father will come to thee soon; Rest, rest, on mother's breast, Father will come to thee soon; Father will come to his babe in the nest, Silver sails all out of the west Under the silver moon: Sleep, my little one, sleep, my pretty one, sleep.
Contents
"FATHER WILL COME TO HIS BABE IN THE NEST."
Airy, fairy Lilian, Flitting, fairy Lilian, When I ask her if she love me, Claps her tiny hands above me, Laughing all she can; She'll not tell me if she love me, Cruel little Lilian.
LILIAN.
When my passion seeks Pleasance in love-sighs, She, looking thro' and thro' me Thoroughly to undo me, Smiling, never speaks: So innocent-arch, so cunning-simple, From beneath her gather'd wimple Glancing with black-beaded eyes, Till the lightning laughters dimple The baby-roses in her cheeks; Then away she flies.
Prythee weep, May Lilian! Gayety without eclipse Wearieth me, May Lilian: Thro' my very heart it thrilleth When from crimson-threaded lips Silver-treble laughter trilleth: Prythee weep, May Lilian.
Pra in all I can,
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