The Cohousing Handbook
305 Pages
English

The Cohousing Handbook

-

305 Pages
English

Description

>> Print feature campaign (trajectory of cohousing trend) to features editors at major newspapers, esp. areas where cohousing is popular (primarily east and west coasts); also review mailing to community-minded and general interest magazines and journals.

An updated edition of the essential guide to building a cohousing community

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Published 01 March 2009
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EAN13 9781550923148
Language English
Document size 2 MB

Legal information: rental price per page €. This information is given for information only in accordance with current legislation.

Exrait

Advance Praise for The Cohousing Handbook
Chris and Kelly review all aspects of organizing, designing, developing, financing and constructing the building of communities in a readable, easily accessible format the reader will undoubtedly refer to over and over again. A“must-read” for anyone ready to move beyond talk. Kathryn McCamant,The Cohousing Company, co-author of Cohousing: A Contemporary Approach to Housing Ourselves
The Cohousing Handbookis an excellent start-to-finish overview, with a fine section on environmental stewardship. Cohousing is an important example of the global solutions we all must embrace in order to use land efficiently, and resources wisely, while creating healthy and vibrant communities for our future. Bert Gregory AIA, President & CEO, Mithun Architects+Designers+Planners
What can I say? This is simply just the best resource for cohousing design guidance available today. The beauty of it is the new and updated information built on real experience. We, in the profession, all have to offer thanks to Chris and Kelly for their contribution to cohousing’s popularity and quality of development in the United States. Kirk Gastinger,FAIA, Gastinger Walker Harden Architects, co-founder of AIA Committee on the Environment
A straightforward map through the myriad of challenges inherent in design and group processes. This handbook is an essential reference for anyone embarking on a cohousing project. Shelley Penner,BID, Founding Member and Director, Eco Design Resource Society
If you yearn to live in a cohousing community, before you organize your first meeting, write your first check, or visit your first site, bone up on this indispensable how-to guide. Its vital, practical information will empower your group, increase your confidence, and improve the chances that your dream community will actually get built‹and on time and on budget! Diana Leafe Christian, author ofCreating a Life Together: Practical Tools to Grow Ecovillages and Intentional Communities, editor ofCommunitiesmagazine
Cohousers are partners in a unique development process, and this book is the perfect handbook to guide that process. Cohousers must achieve some measure of fluency as “resident developers” in order to constructively contribute — with TheCohousing Handbook, Chris and Kelly have provided essential tools to make it all possible. Bruce Coldham,Coldham Architects
Kelly and Chris wrote this eminently practical book to summarize everything they have learned about making cohousing work in 20 years of doing it. They cover all the steps.... The writing is clear and full of concrete details that make the general principles spring to life. Gifford Pinchot,from the Foreword
NE WSO C I E T YPU B L I S H E R S
Cataloging in Publication Data: A catalog record for this publication is available from the National Library of Canada.
Copyright © 2005 by Chris ScottHanson and Kelly ScottHanson. All rights reserved.
Cover design by Diane MacIntosh, illustration by Laura Fitch.
Printed in Canada. First printing, December 2004.
Paperback ISBN: 0-86571-517-3
Inquiries regarding requests to reprint all or part ofThe Cohousing Handbook should be addressed to New Society Publishers at the address below.
To order directly from the publishers, please add $4.50 shipping to the price of the first copy, and $1.00 for each additional copy (plus GST in Canada). Send check or money order to:
New Society Publishers P.O. Box 189, Gabriola Island, BC V0R 1X0, Canada 1-800-567-6772
New Society Publishers’ mission is to publish books that contribute in funda-mental ways to building an ecologically sustainable and just society, and to do so with the least possible impact on the environment, in a manner that models this vision. We are committed to doing this not just through education, but through action. We are acting on our commitment to the world’s remaining ancient forests by phasing out our paper supply from ancient forests worldwide. This book is one step towards ending global deforestation and climate change. It is printed on acid-free paper that is 100% old growth forest-free (100% post-con-sumer recycled), processed chlorine free, and printed with vegetable based, low VOC inks. For further information, or to browse our full list of books and pur-chase securely, visit our website at: www.newsociety.com
NEWSOCIETYPUBLISHERS
www.newsociety.com
Contents
Acknowledgments.................................................................................................... vii Contributors............................................................................................................... ix Foreword by Gifford Pinchot.................................................................................. xi Chapter One: Introduction...................................................................................... 1 Why Community?What is Cohousing?What is this book?Don’t read this book!Theory and practiceThe creative processSetting goals and achieving themShort answers to a few common questionsChapter Two: Forming a Group........................................................................... 17 Identity and becomingAnother being in the roomWe are each different — finding out who you areGroup process and group dynamicsMaintaining recordsOrganization developmentSpecial issuesChapter Three: The Development Process........................................................ 39 Patterns for successWhat is a developer?How does a developer create Cohousing?Chapter Four: Working with Professionals........................................................ 51 What professionals will you need?Who (or what) is an architect?Selection processContractsUsing professionals effectivelyPerformance reviewChapter Five: Buying Land.................................................................................... 65 Land is availableDefining expectationsMapping realityThe search processTalking to land ownersMaking an offerTrying againFeasibility analysisProject feasibility checklistSpecial considerationsForming an organizationSummaryChapter Six: The Design Process......................................................................... 93 The language of designWorking with your design teamParallel design tracksProgrammingGoals for the site planWhat if we need to change the program?Schematic designConstruction documentsValue engineering or cost reconciliationConstruction supervisionPost-occupancy evaluationSummaryChapter Seven: Design Considerations............................................................ 125 Purposeful separation from the carPedestrian pathwaysKitchens facing the pedestrian pathwaysCentrally located common house
Optimum community sizeLearning from the pastAffordabilityHow design affects affordabilityDesign alternatives and housing typesSite considerationsThe common housePrivate unit designSummaryChapter Eight: Environment............................................................................... 149 Use of the carSite selectionSite planningHousing typesReduce, reuse, recycleManaging costssummaryChapter Nine: Legal Issues.................................................................................. 167 Legal adviceOwnership structureSetting up your corporationSummaryChapter Ten: Finance and Budget...................................................................... 179 It takes moneyLanguage of development financingBudgets and pro formasBorrowing moneyOther issuesEstablishing preliminary unit pricingSummaryChapter Eleven: Marketing and Membership................................................. 203 Why marketing and membershipWho are cohousing people?Race and ethnicity in cohousingWhat attracts people to cohousing? Themarketing planImplementing the plan — a few recommendationsNew membersDatabase and waiting list maintenanceSummaryChapter Twelve: Scheduling and Planning....................................................... 229 Project tasks and milestonesSchedule chartsSample schedule chartsSummaryChapter Thirteen: Permits and Approvals....................................................... 237 Land use approvalsBuilding permits (fire and safety approvals)The common house kitchenAppealable actionsCommon types of government approvalsOther considerationsThree examples of the approval processNumber of housing units allowedSpeeding up the processChapter Fourteen: The Construction Process................................................. 251 Typical construction scheduleLetting goDesign changesMaking sweat equity practicalManaging the contingency fundSummaryChapter Fifteen: Moving In................................................................................. 257 Move-in packetPlan your move — individually, and as a communityMove-in schedulePlanning for the futureSummaryAppendix: Sample Documents........................................................................... 263 Index......................................................................................................................... 283 About the Authors................................................................................................. 290
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Acknowledgments
or helping me understand, I would like to thank the members of all the F cohousing communities I have worked with over the past 16 years. Together, and each in their own way, they have shown me what is possible. Much has hap-pened, and much has been learned since the first edition of this book came out in the summer of 1996. While it has been hard to know just what to include, we have tried to provide a sampling of all this new wisdom in this 2004 edition. I would especially like to thank all those who are now living in cohousing who make their homes, their hearts and their communities available to those who still dream of creating cohousing for themselves. This is an invaluable serv-ice, and very generous of you. A big thank you to my first editor, Brian Scrivener who helped me get it all organized in the first place, and to those at Hartley & Marks, and more recently New Society Publishers, for all their encouragement and support along the way. And thanks to all those who made written or graphic contributions to either edi-tion of this book. A special thanks to my family and friends, for understanding and accepting that cohousing has not been my work since 1988; it has truly been my life. And thank you Kelly for all that you have contributed to this new edition. I am excited by what I see on the horizon — a bigger, grander movement that is based on the principals of green, sustainable community. Multiple cohous-ing communities, in mixed use, ecovillage projects, on a much larger scale than we have seen in North America before. This new movement is growing out of what the pioneers of cohousing have learned and created, and will benefit great-ly by that wisdom. Thank you cohousers for making the world a better place, one neighborhood at a time.
Chris ScottHanson, September 1, 2004
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T H E C O H O U S I N G H A N D B O O K
I would like to thank my partner and husband Chris for encouraging me to co-author this second edition ofThe Cohousing Handbook. Without his patience and generosity it would not have been possible. I would also like to thank my dear friends — Lynette Thompson, Belinda Payne and Rebecca Bilbao for tolerating my curt responses,“I can’t talk” — while this book was underway. A huge thank you to the staff and faculty at the Bainbridge Graduate Institute for cheering me on, as well. The MBA program I finished there this past spring opened my eyes to a whole new world of sustainable business prac-tices and right livelihood. And of course we both need to thank our children — James, Sarah and Emma — who were really more patient than we could ever have anticipated.
Kelly ScottHanson, August 12, 2004
A C K N O W L E D G M E N T S
Contributors We would like to thank the following people for their contribution to our book. It was a pleasure to work with such professionals. Tree Breesanis a professional group process consultant who works with cohousing groups on how to have meetings that are lively, productive, and con-necting. Her work is founded on a desire to help groups put their ideals into action. She’s been living in community since 1994, currently at Walnut St. Co-op in Eugene, Oregon. Laura Fitchis a principal with Kraus-Fitch Architects, Inc., a firm special-izing in cohousing and ecological design. She is a resident of Pioneer Valley Cohousing, the first cohousing community to be completed on the east coast. She provided the artwork for the cover design. Kate KaemerleKateis the Managing Director of EnTech Public Relations. recently received her MBA in green business practices at Bainbridge Graduate Institute. Mary Krausis a principal with Kraus-Fitch Architects, Inc., a firm specializing in cohousing and ecological design. She has worked with numerous communi-ties nationally, using a consensus-based participatory design process. She was a charter board member of the Cohousing Association of the US. Tom Moenchis a long time member of the Winslow Cohousing Group, one of the first cohousing villages in the United States. An organizational consult-ant, he specializes in human capability, group dynamics and organization structure. He has participated, led, and coached a variety of teams in various corporations and communities. Tim Tayloris the CEO of The Environmental Home Center, Seattle, Wa. Tim is a serial entrepreneur and a founding member of the Investors’ Circle, which directs private equity into environmental businesses, and has served on the boards of several groups involved in environmental, forestry, and conservation issues. Rich Vialhas practiced law in the areas of real estate, homeowner associa-tions and community development since 1981. He tries to live by the adage that an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure when it comes to disputes in this modern age. His wisdom and foresight are extraordinary and we seek his counsel often.
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