288 Pages
English

Art of Siberia

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Description

The art of Siberia is a fascinating subject, and the artifacts discovered in the hidden archives of the Russian Museum of Ethnography in St. Petersburg are nothing less than extraordinary. Artwork, day-to-day subjects and photos dating from the turn of the century all represent the testimonies of the Siberian people who refused to yield to the hegemony of a modern world.

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Published by
Published 09 March 2016
Reads 1
EAN13 9781785257353
Language English
Document size 86 MB

Legal information: rental price per page 0.0025€. This information is given for information only in accordance with current legislation.

ArtofSiberia
Valentina Gorbatcheva
Marina Federova
Text: Maria Czaplicka, Valentina Gorbatcheva, Marina Federova
Layout: Baseline Co Ltd, 61A - 63A Vo Van Tan St. th Nam Minh Long Building, 4 Floor District 3, Ho Chi Minh City Vietnam
© Parkstone Press International, New York, USA © Confidential Concepts, Worldwide, USA
All right reserved. No parts of this publication may be reproduced or adapted without the permission of the copyright holder, throughout the world. Unless otherwise specified, copyright on the works reproduced lies with the respective photographers. Despite intensive research, it has not always been possible to etablish copyright ownership. Where this is the case, we would appreciate notification.
ISBN: 978-1-78525-735-3
A RT of S IBERIA
INTRODUCTION
CONTENTS
I. SIBERIA: GEOGRAPHY AND HISTORY A. An Inhospitable Climate B. People in the Wasteland C. The TransSiberian Railway II. TRADITIONAL DAILY LIFE A. The Routine of Survival B. Earth and Water C. Indigenous Clothing
III. SHAMANISM Introduction A. The Shaman B. Types of Shaman C. The Accessories of the Shaman D. The Shaman in Action
THE SONG OF THE SHAMAN THE PEOPLES OF SIBERIA BIBLIOGRAPHY LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
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A S RT of IBERIA
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INTRODUCTION
The Evenki, the Yukaghirs, the Chukchi, the Koryaks, the Nenets, the Nanai people, the Yakuts, the Tuva people . . . Cradle of many cultures, Siberia constitutes an area that is rich in human traditions, as diverse and changeable over time as the region itself. The native inhabitants of Siberia, dwellers in the lands of far-northern and far-eastern Russia – by tradition reindeer-herders, horse-breeders, hunters of marine mammals and fishermen-hunters – have, over the millennia, evolved the means by which human communities may survive in this vast desert of extreme climatic conditions in northern Asia. Through their prolonged proximity to nature, the native inhabitants of the icy, Arctic expanses have learned to make a home in the wasteland, using every natural element at their disposal to create more than rude tents and campfires: they have become artists. The tribal cultures of Siberia express themselves in everything from the intricate designs on a walrus tusk, to the many-coloured glass beads on a woman’s dress, to the delicately carved child’s toy, to the ambiguously haunting shaman’s mask. In an environment in which utility and survival are everything, these rapidly disappearing communities release their artistic cry into the wilderness. Unfortunately, colonization by incoming cultures has in many cases caused a significant decline in the fortunes of such groups. Confronted with the more destructive aspects of Russian expansion and the Industrial Revolution, both the indigenous cultures and their all-important environment are threatened. As reindeer and fish disappear and the native populations dwindle, we are losing the opportunity to observe these profoundly simple and diverse communities. Those with the fewest numbers today may yet witness for themselves the extinction of their ancestral cultures. What follows is an overview of the relationship between Siberia’s extraordinary climate, the varied terrain and the peoples, along with a summary of the background from which those peoples stemmed, and accounts of historical events that dramatically altered their way of life. In the descriptions of shamanic principles, practices, and the essential role that the shaman plays in the daily lives of Siberian groups, we may glimpse the spiritual and artistic yearnings of these cultures. This book’s constant endeavour is to enable the reader to enter fully into the traditional world and shamanist mindset of the original inhabitants of ‘Russian’ Asia.
A S RT of IBERIA
The Lena on the breakup of the ice.
Ivan Shishkin, Hiver,1890. Oil on canvas, 125.5 x 204 cm. Russian Museum, St. Petersburg.
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ART ofSIBERIA
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