301 Pages
English
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Africa's Growing Role in World Politics

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Gain access to the library to view online
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301 Pages
English

Description

This volume, titled �Africa�s Growing Role in World Politics,� includes a selection of papers dedicated to the problems of the contemporary international relations and foreign policies of the African states. Most of these papers were presented at the panels, held within the framework of the 13th International Conference of Africanists �Society and Politics in Africa: Traditional, Transitional and New� (Moscow, Russia, May 27�30, 2014). The book contains many articles devoted to the Western countries� policies in Africa. On the background of the ongoing competition between Washington and Beijing, the US Administration has recently increased the amount of attention it pays to the continent. European Union is also actively developing its strategic partnership with Africa. The authors analyze thoroughly the ongoing cooperation between African states and a great �emerging donor� and investor � China. They particularly address the question about possible implications of China�s African policy for the countries of the continent. Major attention is given to Sudan and South Sudan. One of the urgent problems addressed by this book is the situation with African IDPs and refugees, their life conditions in camps and the measures for their transition to normal life.

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Published 13 June 2016
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EAN13 9780994032591
Language English
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INSTITUTE FOR AFRICAN STUDIES RUSSIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES
AFRICAʼS GROWING ROLE IN WORLD POLITICS
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Editors:
Tatiana DEYCH Alexander ZHUKOV Olga KULKOVA Evgeny KORENDYASOV
All papers referred by external peer review.
The views expressed in articles are the authors’ own and do not necessarily reflect the publisher's editorial policy.
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CONTENTS
PREFACE……………………………………………………………… 5 I. AFRICA: GLOBAL, REGIONAL AND LOCAL DIMENSIONS 1.Evgeny Korendyasov.African States’ Foreign Policies st in the 21 Century: New Opportunities and Challenges …………… 7 2.Anatoly Khazanov.Why Anti-American Fever is Shaking Arab World? …………………………………………………........... 17 3.Natalia Sepeleva.Analysis of the Humanitarian Situation in Africa South of Sahara. (The Case of the Great African Lakes) ..... 22 4.Alexander Zhukov.Eritrea’s Role in the Horn of Africa Regional Politics: Background, Status Quo, and Prospects ………… 27 5. Sergey Kostelyanets.Sudan after the Division with South Sudan: Economic Crisis and Political Instability …………………… 39 6.Sergey Seregichev.An ‘Arab Spring’ Scenario in the Republic of Sudan: still Realistic or yet Unrealistic? …………………………. 45 II. OECD STATES AND AFRICA: NEW APPROACHES 1.ndrey Urnov.B.Obama Administration Policy in Africa ………. 50 2.Olga Kulkova.Africa and the EU: Drifting Together or Running Counter? Key Problems of the Dialogue at the Present Stage ………………………………………………...... 60 3.Claudia Mularoni, Piero Scarpellini.EU Procedures Related to Africa Support Programs: a Transparency Tool or an Incomprehensible Barrier? ……………………………………. 71 4.Sergey Poruchikov.Cooperation between African States and European Union in the Sphere of Intellectual Migration ……….. 80 Grigory Karpov.Trends of African Diasporas’ Development in UK and EU in the 2000s ………………………………………...... 92 6.Ivan Lileev.EU Policies towards Africa and NewEvolution of European Approaches to Development Aid………………… 101 7. Dmitriy Kochetov.Trade and Economic Relations between Italy and North Africa after the ‘Arab Spring’………………………. 106 st 8.Anton Rodin.Japan and Africa in the Beginning of the 21 Century ……………………………………………………………… 114 9. Murad Shamilov.South Korean Interests in Africa: Analysis and Persp121ectives …………………………………………………….
III.BRICS: ENTITY’S ROLE ON AFRICAN CONTINENT 1.Vladimir Yurtaev.BRICS: Regional Dimension of Economics and Politics ………………………………………………………….. 127 2.Nina Tsvetkova.TNC from Asian BRICS Countries in the ICT Sphere of Africa and the Interests of Russia ………………………... 133 3.Justin Van der Merve.BRICS Puzzle: the Rise of the Non-West or Veiled Sub-Imperialism? ………………………………………… 145 4.Serhlare Makgetlaneng.Theoretical Marginalisation of SA’s Membership to BRICS by Some South African Scholars. Key Issues … 163 IV. CHINA IN AFRICA: STRENGTHENING THE PARTNERSHIP st 1.Tatiana Deych.China’s Role in Africa in the 21 176Century ……… 2.David Shinn.Ethiopia and China: Two Former Empires Connects in the 20th Century …………………………………………………. 187 3.Mamoudou Gazibo.Can Africa Benefit from its Booming Cooperation with China? The State Capacity Factor in Comparative Perspective ………………………………………………………….. 200 4.Alice Nicole Sindzingre.China’s Relationship with Sub-Saharan Africa: Despite Convergence with Industrialized Countries, Drivers or Structural Transformation?……………………………………….. 209 5.Yury Smertin.233China and Africa: Mutual Interest ………………… V. RUSSIA-AFRICA RELATIONS IN PAST AND PRESENT 1.Evgeny Korendyasov.239Russia Returns to Africa ………………….. 2.Galina Smirnova.Russia’s Trade and Economic Cooperation with Sudan and South Sudan: Status Quo and Prospects …………… 247 3.Mohamed Hamchi, Samia Rebiai.Russian-Algerian Relations in a Multipolarizing World ………………………………………….. 257 VI. OTHER BRICS COUNTRIES’ CONTRIBUTION IN AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT 1.Viacheslav Usov.African Policy of India and Indian Diaspora: Risk Assessment …………………………………………………….. 274 2.Alla Borzova.Brazil’s Cooperation with Africa (Agricultural Aspect) 282 3.Aya Abenova.The International Cooperation for African Development: BRICS and South Africa’s Role …………………….. 289 Authors………………………………………………………………….294
PREFACE
We have witnessed an unprecedented growth of the African countries’ role in the international relations and world policy. The Africa of nowadays is on the upsurge. We see the process that used to be called “African Renais-sance”. Although the differentiation between African countries takes place, some countries experience robust economic growth: seven from ten most quickly developing countries of the world are from Africa. There is much to debate about political and economic processes in Africa and about its current and probably future orientation. Earlier Africa was largely oriented to wards former colonial countries in the continent as well as towards the USA. The latest global financial crisis, that had a heavy impact on Europe and North America, motivated the coun-tries of the continent to “look at East” and to forge closer ties with Asia and Latin America. The emergence of BRICS as a new global entity has marked some of the large-scale changes in the landscape of the world economy, and Africa has become more involved in its orbit. As some experts argue, Af-rica’s growth was influenced greatly by its relationship with BRICS. But, for African countries, their relations with the West are not less important and still draw major attention to themselves because of growing competition be-tween ‘old’ and ‘new’ actors in the political and economic arenas of the Af-rican continent. This volume, titled “Africa’s Growing Role in World Politics,” includes a selection of papers dedicated to the problems of the contemporary interna-tional relations and foreign policies of the African states. Most of these pa-pers were presented at the panels, held within the framework of the 13th In-ternational Conference of Africanists “Society and Politics in Africa: Tradi-tional, Transitional and New” (Moscow, Russia, May 27–30, 2014): Panel IV-7 “Russia and Africa in the Context of North-South Relations and in the Framework of BRICS”, Panel IV-1 “Africa and the EU: Past, Present, Fu-ture” and Panel VII-2 “External Agency in the Greater Horn of Africa: A Comparative Analysis of Non-Regional Powers Engagement from the Cold War to Present”. The reader will find below a collective work aimed at ana-lyzing various aspects of the present-day political and economic situations in the African continent and around it. The volume also seeks to contribute to the study of the African countries’ growing roles in the global international relations of the 21st century. The book contains many articles devoted to the Western countries’ poli-cies in Africa. On the background of the ongoing competition between Washington and Beijing, the US Administration has recently increased the amount of attention it pays to the continent. European Union is also actively
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developing its strategic partnership with Africa. The authors analyze the pe-culiarities of economic and political relations in the EU-Africa framework, the changing aid paradigm, the European countries’ engagement in conflicts resolution in Africa. Some of the problems that are in the focus of research-ers’ attention are the growing African migration to Europe and the challenges related to this process. African policies of emerging powers, first of all, of the BRICS countries, which are now effectively competing in Africa with the USA and former co-lonial powers, is another subject of major attention in the contemporary Afri-can Studies. The authors analyze thoroughly the ongoing cooperation be-tween African states and a great “emerging donor” and investor – China. They particularly address the question about possible implications of China’s African policy for the countries of the continent. Another subject of their analyses is the Russia-Africa relations. Several articles are devoted to Afri-can policies of such BRICS countries, as India and Brazil. The foreign policy of BRICS newcomer – South Africa – has also attracted considerable interest of the researchers, participating in this book. They argue, for example, that South Africa’s priorities in international relations include its advocating for the consolidation of global powers’ Africa Agendas. South Africa has also positioned itself as an arbiter in the African continent. The volume also sheds light on the policies of other emerging Asian powers, such as South Korea. These states are currently enhancing their engagement with the countries in the African continent. In particular, over the last years, they have been ex-panding the technical, economic, trade and cultural ties with Africa. The book also includes articles devoted to the global problems, pertain-ing to the African states and to their regi onal issues, particularly to their rela-tions with the world, and to their regional problems related to the questions of security and conflict resolution. The authors pay major attention, in par-ticular, to Sudan and South Sudan. One of the urgent problems addressed by this book is the situation with African IDPs and refugees, their life conditions in camps and the measures for their transition to normal life. Authors of the presented articles ar e researchers, working in African Studies and representing different scientific schools of the world. Among them are PhD holders, professors and post-graduate students. Many of them represent institutions affiliated with Russian Academy of Sciences, primarily the Moscow-based Institute for African Studies and Institute for Oriental Studies. Some researchers represent Peoples’ Friendship University of Rus-sia, other Russian universities and non-educational research centers. The se-lection also includes a number of papers written by scholars from the USA, France, Canada, Algeria, South Africa, and Kazakhstan.
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I. AFRICA: GLOBAL, REGIONAL AND LOCAL DIMENSIONS
Evgeny Korendyasov, PhD (Economy) Institute for African Studies RAS
AFRICAN STATESʼ FOREIGN POLICIES IN THE 21st CENTURY: NEW OPPORTUNITIES AND CHALLENGES
In two last decades the foreign policy concepts of African states have undergone significant and large-scale changes. The essence of these changes is in the increasing independence of African foreign policies and in the grow-ing role of the African continent as a dynamic actor in global politics and economy. Today African states have more opportunities than ever before to deter-mine their own future, to build the architecture of intr-continental and ex-ternal relations independently. The driving force of the current changes gen-erated by the energy of global transformations, by the acceleration of the economic development and modernization processes on the continent, by the shift of the main axis of the global economic development to the East, and also by the emerging challenges and threats of globalization. These same changes contributed to the collapse of the bipolar model of international rela-tions, to the extinction of rigid confrontation between the opposing gro ups, to the fall of the Soviet Union, and the end of the Cold War. The system of in-ternational relations, which formed in the second half of the 20th century, has come into sharp collision with the new realities. The search for the new world order adequate for the new challenges and threats the humankind faces has taken a stormy, often conflicting character. The African continent has found itself in an extremely difficult position. It has become a stepdaughter of globalization. It seemed that the 21st century would not promise it any change for the better. However, such predictions soon disproved. A British magazine with worldwide reputation,The Econo-mist, in 2000 described Africa as a "hopeless" continent. However, in 2011 the same magazine pictured Africa as "rising", while in March 2011 – as "hopeful".
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The Africans themselves are optimistic about their future. The former chairperson of the Commission of African Union, Jean Ping, stated that Africa would soon shed the reputation of a "hopeless continent”. It would join the ranks of the key players of the global politics. Jean Ping believed that Africa was going to be in the centre of the struggle between the gr eat powers for the control over the energy resources, that Africa would take an active part in the reformation of the "outdated system of global gov-1 ernance" . When the 21st century came, the processes of structural re-formatting of global political space and of creating the new world order based on the prin-ciples of the primacy of the international law, democracy and justice have in-tensified. African governments started to re-consider their foreign policy priori-ties, their close attachment to the national interests and to the aim of over-coming their economic backwardness, keeping in mind the new realities gen-erated by the deepening interdependen ce and the need to consider the inter-ests of all regions and peoples. Beginning a new attack on the foreign policy front, the Africans are relying on their improved economic positions. The economic growth of Af-rican countries in the past two decades has been an average of 4–6%. In twenty oil not-producing countries of sub-Saharan Africa the annual 2 growth rate from 1998 to 2008 was 4% and above . Africa’s GDP grew (according to purchasing power parity, PPP) from $1.9 trillion in 2000 to $3 trillion – in 2014, i.e. by 70%. In terms of per capita, 3 GDP in 2014 reached $3 thousand (by PPP) . Africa occupies the second or third place in terms of the attractiveness for foreign direct investment. From 4 2000 to 2012, its value increased fourfold (from $154 billion to $630 billion) . The drivers of the "African boom", in our opinion, are long-term. These include: – the wealth of natural resources, which are of critical importance to the global economy; – the demographic trends: by 2040 the continent will account for 90% of 5 the growth of the world population and for 65% of labour force growth ; – the growing consumer demand (by 2020 the Africans' consumption expenditures will amount to $1.4 trillion, whereas today they are at the level 6 of $800 billion) . The development of positive trends in the economy of the continent gave grounds to Jean Ping to declare, "In the context when the evolution of pro-duction and the possession of natural resources predetermine the interna-tional relations, the whole world realized that it would be more and more dif-ficult and even impossible to continue to systematically ignore the whole 7 continent..." .
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