Education, Economy and Identity

Education, Economy and Identity

English
118 Pages

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Modern education in Thailand started at the end of the nineteenth century under the impulse of King Chulalongkorn. Many scholars tracing back the evolution from traditional education to a modern education system emphasized the feeling of necessity that motivated this transformation. Wyatt (1969), Mead (2004) and Watson (1982) underlined the need for a modern administration, to handle the Siamese nation-state “as” the Western states, and in that respect, the key role played by education to structure the new Siam and to appear to the eyes of the world as civilized (Peleggi 2002). The shaping of a new education took place amidst strong political struggles. Siam needed to stand firm within the regional arena, swept by the winds of Western colonialism. Internally, King Chulalongkorn had to legitimize his power and to unify the kingdom by integrating satellite kingdoms into a wider space, the Siamese nation state. Education was vital for this mission as it would contribute not only to bringing state power into the provinces through state-paid teachers and government officials, but also to transmitting a whole nation-related imagery to the young generations. Giving rise to Thai-ness among the populations located at the margins of the kingdom was a tremendous ordeal. In the Southern part of the kingdom, population was mainly Muslim, spoke Malay and felt culturally closer to the Malay state (Dulyakasem 1991). In the Northern part, incorporating the Lanna kingdom and hill tribe populations into Siam proved not to be easy. Ideological, social and national values were introduced into education delivered to students, and with the implementation of the Compulsory Education Act of 1921, school attendance tied children and parents to the nation state and made them liable to it.


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Published 03 July 2018
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Education, Economy and Identity Ten years of Educational Reform in Thailand
Supat Chupradit and Audrey Baron-Gutty (dir.)
DOI: ERREUR PDO dans /data/www-bin/Core/Core/Db/Db.class.php L.34 : SQLSTATE[HY000] [2006] MySQL server has gone away Publisher: Institut de recherche sur l’Asie du Sud-Est contemporaine Year of publication: 2009 Published on OpenEdition Books: 3 July 2018 Serie: Carnets de l’Irasec Electronic ISBN: 9782355960000
http://books.openedition.org
Printed version ISBN: 9786169028208 Number of pages: 118
Electronic reference CHUPRADIT, Supat (ed.) ; BARON-GUTTY, Audrey (ed.).Education, Economy and Identity: Ten years of Educational Reform in Thailand.New edition [online]. Bangkok: Institut de recherche sur l’Asie du Sud-Est contemporaine, 2009 (generated 05 juillet 2018). Available on the Internet: . ISBN: 9782355960000.
This text was automatically generated on 5 July 2018.
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Modern education in Thailand started at the end of the nineteenth century under the im pulse of King Chulalong korn. Many scholars tracin g back the evolution from traditional education to a m odern education system em phasized the feeling of necessity that m otivated this transform ation. Wyatt (1969), Mead (2004) and Watson (1982) underlined the need for a m odern adm inistration, to handle the Siam ese nation -state “as” the Western states, and in that respect, the key role played by education to structure the new Siam and to appear to the eyes of the world as civilized (Peleg g i 2002). The shaping of a new education took place am idst strong political strug g les. Siam needed to stand firm within the reg ional arena, swept by t he winds of Western colonialism . Internally, King Chulalong korn had to leg itim ize hi s power and to unify the king dom by integ rating satellite king dom s into a wider space, the Siam ese nation state. Education was vital for this m ission as it would contribute not o nly to bring ing state power into the provinces throug h state-paid teachers and g overnm en t officials, but also to transm itting a whole nation-related im ag ery to the young g eneratio ns. Giving rise to Thai-ness am ong the populations located at the m arg ins of the king dom was a trem endous ordeal. In the Southern part of the king dom , population was m ainly Muslim , spoke Malay and felt culturally closer to the Malay state (Dulyakasem 1991). In the Northern part, incorporating the Lanna king dom and hill trib e populations into Siam proved not to be easy. Ideolog ical, social and national values were introduced into education delivered to students, and with the im plem entation of the Com pul sory Education Act of 1921, school attendance tied children and parents to the nation state and m ade them liable to it.
SUPAT CHUPRADIT
Supat Chupradit (CELS, Faculty of Education, Chiang Mai University) is a PhD student in Research and Developm ent in Education. His thesis topic deals with dual vocational training in secondary education in Thailand, and its role in skills and knowledg e form ation and transm ission. He has taken part in CELS- conducted research projects, including the one funded by NRCT (National Research Council of Thailand) on education and poverty.
AUDREY BARON-GUTTY
Audrey Baron-Gutty (Université de Lyon, Institut d’Asie Orientale) is a PhD Student in Political Science. Her thesis deals with the im pact of g lobalization on the m aking and im plem entation of national educational policies, with a special focus on Thailand and its educational reform launched in 1999. She was sponsored for two years by the IRASEC to carry out her field work and the CELS (Centre for Education and Labour Studies), based at Chiang Mai University, provided her with institutional support.
EDITOR'S NOTE
With contribution from Audrey Baron-Gutty, Chitrlada Burapharat, Kwanchewan Buadaeng, Supat Chupradit, and Prasit Leepreecha. In collaboration with the CELS (Center for Education and Labour Studies), Chiang Mai University.
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Contributors
Note on Transliteration
Acronyms
Glossary
Introduction. Understanding the Challenges of the Educational Reform in Thailand Audrey Baron-Gutty Objectives of the study Methodolog y/Research Questions/Hypothesis Paper outline
Chapter 1. Reinforcing Thai wisdom with local curriculum at school Audrey Baron-Gutty and Supat Chupradit Introduction 1. Sample Presentation and Backg round Information 2. Actors of the local curriculum 3. Content of the local curriculum Conclusion
Chapter 2. Modern education systems and impact on ethnic minorities Kwanchewan Buadaeng and Prasit Leepreecha Introduction 1. Development of the modern education system in Thailand 2. The “hill tribes” of Thailand in the g eopolitics of the Cold War 3. Extending modern education to the hig hlands: the role of state ag encies 4. Impact of modern curriculum on hill tribes 5. Attempts from Government Org anizations, Non-Governmental Org anizations (NGOs) and People Org anizations (POs) to reform education Conclusion: problems and challeng es
Chapter 3. Vocational and cooperative education in Thailand: A Presentation Chitrlada Burapharat and Supat Chupradit Introduction 1. Vocational education in Thailand 2. Cooperative education in Thailand Conclusion
Chapter 4. Fix-it centres: Adaptation and outcomes of the “clusters of the poor”. A case study in Chiang Mai Audrey Baron-Gutty and Supat Chupradit Introduction 1. Fix-it centres and the cluster policy 2. Case study of a Fix-it centre project in the Chiang Mai area Conclusion
Chapter 5. Strengthening university-industry links through co-op education: Case studies in Thailand Audrey Baron-Gutty and Supat Chupradit Introduction 1. Recruiting students for co-op prog rammes 2. Setting up a relevant curriculum 3. Assig nments in the workplace: The key role of the university supervisor Conclusion
Conclusion. The Need for a Real Educational Reform Audrey Baron-Gutty and Supat Chupradit
References
Contributors
Audrey BARON-GUTTY(Université de Lyon, Institut d’Asie Orientale)is a PhD Student in Political Science. Her thesis deals with the im pact of g lobal ization on the m aking and im plem entation of national educational policies, wi th a special focus on Thailand and its educational reform launched in 1999. She was sponso red for two years by the IRASEC to carry out her field work and the CELS (Centre for E ducation and Labour Studies), based at Chiang Mai University, provided her with institutional support. Chitrlada BURAPHARAT(Department of Arts, Media and Design, Faculty of Fine Arts, Chiang Mai University)n. She holds a doctoralis a lecturer in Learning Process, and Inform ation Desig deg ree in Adult Education (Workplace Learning and C hang e) earned at the University of Toronto. Her current research focuses on critical t hinking , alternative teaching and learning ; and com petency developm ent. She was in charg e for three years (2007-2009) in supervising and desig ning cooperative education pro g ram m e using French IUT1 m odel for Modern Manag em ent and Inform ation Technolog y (M MIT), Colleg e of Arts, Media and Technolog y (CAMT), Chiang Mai University. Kwanchewan BUADAENG(Department of Sociology-Anthropology, Faculty of Social Sciences, Chiang Mai University)earned her PhD in Anthropolog y at the University of Sydney in 2001. She is a lecturer in Sociolog y and Anthropolog y at the Facul ty of Social Sciences, Chiang Mai University. Her research focuses on hill tribes in Thailand and neig hbouring countries, with a special em phasis on cultural and ethnic identities. Her previous works analysed both the im pact of m odernization and g overnm ent policy on et hnic peoples' lives, and their responses to m odernization and g lobalization. Supat CHUPRADIT(CELS, Faculty of Education, Chiang Mai University)is a PhD student in Research and Developm ent in Education. His thesis topic deals with dual vocational training in secondary education in Thailand, and its role in skills and knowledg e form ation and transm ission. He has taken part in CELS-conducted r esearch projects, including the one funded by NRCT (National Research Council of Thailand) on education and poverty. Prasit LEEPREECHA(CESD, Chiang Mai University)y at theearned his PhD in Anthropolog University of Washing ton, Seattle, in 2001. Present ly, he is a researcher at the Social Research Institute and Center for Ethnic Studies an d Developm ent, Chiang Mai University. He is one of the editors ofLiving in a Globalized World : Ethnic Minorities in the Greater Mekong Subregion(2008), andChallenging the Limits : Indigenous Peoples of the Mekong Region(2008). His m ain interests include ethnic m inorities in northern Thailand and m ainland Southeast Asia, identity cultural chang e, tourism , and the im pact o f nationalism and g lobalization on ethnic m inorities.