Land, the State and the Unfinished Decolonisation Project in Africa
407 Pages
English
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Land, the State and the Unfinished Decolonisation Project in Africa

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407 Pages
English

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This book focuses on the work of one of the leading African scholars on the land question and agrarian transformation in Africa—Sam Moyo. It offers a critical discussion, in conversation with Sam Moyo, of the land question and the response of African states. Since independence, African states have been trying to address the colonial legacy on land policy and governance. After six decades of formulating and implementing land reforms, most countries have not succeeded in decolonising approaches to land policy and the administrative framework. The book brings together the broader debates on the implications of decolonisation of Africa’s land policy. Through case studies from several African countries, the book offers an empirical analysis on land reforms and the emerging land relations, and how these affect land allocation and use, including agricultural production. Most of the chapters discuss how the unresolved land question in post-colonial Africa impacts on agricultural production and rural development broadly. The failure to decolonise colonial land policy and the imported tenure systems has left post-colonial African states dancing to two tunes, resulting in schizophrenic land and agrarian policies. The book demonstrates that the failure by African states to reconcile imported and indigenous land tenure systems and practices is evident in the deliberate denigration of customary tenure. It is also evident in the rising land inequality and the neglect of the agricultural sector, the small-scale and subsistence sub-sectors in particular.

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Published 25 June 2019
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EAN13 9789956550470
Language English
Document size 11 MB

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Land, the State and the Unfinished Decolonisation Project in Africa Essays in Honour of Professor Sam Moyo
EDITEDBY Horman Chitonge and Yoichi Mine
Land, the State & the Unfinished Decolonisation Project in Africa: Essays in Honour of Professor Sam Moyo Edited by Horman Chitonge & Yoichi Mine L a ng a a R esea rch & P u blishing CIG Mankon, Bamenda
Publisher:LangaaRPCIG Langaa Research & Publishing Common Initiative Group P.O. Box 902 Mankon Bamenda North West Region Cameroon Langaagrp@gmail.comwww.langaa-rpcig.net Distributed in and outside N. America by African Books Collective orders@africanbookscollective.com www.africanbookscollective.com ISBN-10: 9956-550-58-2 ISBN-13: 978-9956-550-58-6 ©Horman Chitonge & Yoichi Mine 2019All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, mechanical or electronic, including photocopying and recording, or be stored in any information storage or retrieval system, without written permission from the publisher
List of Contributors Peter Lawrence is Professor Emeritus in the Keele School of Management (Economics) at Keele University, UK, and a founding editor of theReview of African Political Economy. His research interests include, African rural cooperation and industrialisation, privatisation in Eastern Europe and unemployment, corporate power and the world economy. Elizabeth Tabotis a PhD candidate in African Studies, University of Cape Town. She holds a Masters degree in African Studies from the Centre of African Studies, Dalarna University, Sweden. Her major research interest includes Human Rights and African Socio-political and economic development, and land rights of minorities’ in Africa. Her PHD study focuses on the land rights of the Mbororo in the Northwest Region of Cameroon. Zhenke Zhangis professor of African Studies and Director of the Centre of African Studies at Nanjin University, Nanjing Province, China. Moses Moyo is a PhD candidate in African Studies, University of Cape Town, South Africa. His research interests include agricultural institutions, poverty, livelihoods and rural development. His PhD looked at the effects of contract farming on rural institutions and livelihoods, focusing on Mazowe tobacco farmers. Yoichi Mineis Professor at the Graduate School of Global Studies, Doshisha University, Japan, and Visiting Fellow at the JICA Research Institute. His research interests include human security, development economics and African area study. Rangarirai Gavin Muchetua PhD candidate at the Graduate is School of Global Studies, Doshisha University, Japan. He received a BSc (hons) and a Master’s degree in Agricultural and Applied Economics from the University of Zimbabwe. He research interests
include land use, food security, productivity, women’s land rights, climate change, youth unemployment and illicit financial flows. Shuichi OyamaAssociate Professor at Centre for African Area is Studies, Kyoto University, Japan. His major research interests are geography and anthropology concerning land issues and people’s livelihoods in Africa, specifically in northern Zambia and Niger. His main works include ‘Land degradation and ecological knowledge-based land rehabilitation. Malvern Kudakwashe Marewo is a PhD candidate in African Studies, University of Cape Town, South Africa. His research interests include land reform, agrarian labour dynamics, agrarian livelihoods and social relations. His PhD focuses on linkages between communal areas and A1 villagised settlements in Zvimba District, Zimbabwe. Yumi Sakatais a research associate both at the Centre for Applied Social Sciences (CASS), University of Zimbabwe, and the Sam Moyo Institute of Agrarian Studies (SMIAS). She obtained a bachelor’s degree in economics from Hosei University, Japan, and a master’s degree in human sciences from Osaka University, Japan. Her research interests include contract farming and the economy of peasants. She is currently working as Second Secretary at the Embassy of Japan in Zimbabwe. Senzeni Ncubeis a Postdoctoral fellow at the Centre for African Studies, University of Cape Town, under the National Research Foundation (NRF) Chair of Land reform and Democracy in South Africa. Her research interests include land reform, social capital, livelihoods and the agrarian political economy of Africa. Her PhD thesis examined the role of social capital in the Fast Track Land Reform Programme (FTLRP) in Zimbabwe, focusing on Matabeleland North Province.
Chizuko Satoa research fellow at the Institute of Developing is Economies (IDE-JETRO), Chiba, Japan. Her current research interests include the challenge of land and agrarian reform, revival of Khoisan identities among “coloured” communities, and social integration of African migrants and refugees in South Africa. Horman Chitongeis Associate Professor at the Centre for African Studies (CAS), University of Cape Town (UCT). His research interests include agrarian political economy, hydro-politics, and alternative strategies for inclusive economic growth and poverty reduction in Africa.
Table of Contents Preface .................................................................................. ix Horman Chitonge & Yoichi Mine Chapter 1. Perspectives on “African Potentials”.......................1 Sam Moyo & Yoichi Mine Chapter 2. The Land Question and the Economy: Cues of an Incomplete Decolonisation Project in Africa .......................................... 21 Horman Chitonge Chapter 3. Corporate Power, the State, and the Post-capitalist Future............................................. 55 Peter Lawrence Chapter 4. Policy-oriented Rural Development in China and its Potential Influence on Rural Development in Africa ............................................... 83 Zhenke Zhang & Jianqin LiChapter 5. Agricultural Land-delivery Systems in Zimbabwe: A Review of Four Decades of Sam Moyo’s Work on Agricultural Land Markets and their Constraints ........................................................... 101 Rangarirai Gavin Muchetu Chapter 6. Cleaning the House, Greening the Farm: Reverse Thinking and “African Potentials” to Combat Desertification in Sahel Region, West Africa....................... 143 Shuichi Oyama
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Chapter 7. Reactions of Peasants to Global Capital in Zimbabwe: A Case Study of Tobacco Contract Farming in Mashonaland East Province ............................ 179 Yumi Sakata Chapter 8. Opportunities and Constraints for Black Farming in a Former South African Homeland: A Case Study of the Mooi River Irrigation Scheme, Msinga, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa ................................ 213 Chizuko Sato Chapter 9. An Assessment of the Cameroonian Government’s Role in the Mbororo Land Struggle in the North-west Region..................................................... 253 Elizabeth Tabot Chapter 10. From friends to strangers? Social capital and the Fast Track Land Reform Programme of Zimbabwe .................................................... 283 Senzeni Ncube Chapter 11. Land Reform, Belonging and Social Relations: Probing the Linkages between Communal Areas and A1 Villagised Settlements in Zvimba District, Zimbabwe........................ 315 Malvern Marewo Chapter 12. Land Contestations after Fast Track Land Reform Programme: Emerging Land Tenure Challenges in Zimbabwe.............. 347 Moses Moyo Chapter 13. The Legacy of Steve Biko and the Japanese Social Movements ........................................... 377 Yoichi Mine
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PrefaceThe State and the Land Question in Africa: The Unfinished Business Horman Chitonge & Yoichi Mine Introduction The way African states have dealt with land and agrarian issues has been a subject of scholarly debates for a long time now. As one would expect, the responses of African states to the land and agrarian issues in Africa has not been the same across countries and time; the responses have largely been shaped by the prevailing political, historical and socioeconomic context. What seems common, though, is that most African states, since independence, have been tinkering with the colonial legacy on land policy and governance structures. Although land and agrarian challenges in African countries have varied, the general sense one gets from the large body of literature accumulated over the years is that most countries have not succeeded in going beyond the colonial framework of land governance and administration in Africa. Indeed the colonial legacy on land in Africa is inscribed as a DNA code, still dictating, in a large measure, the way land is administered, accessed and used. In other words, most countries in Africa have not succeeded to decolonise land governance, administration and tenure arrangements. This is particularly true when it comes to land governance and land tenure issues, all of which are still influenced by the colonial social engineering. Most of the chapters in this volume discuss how these unresolved land issues in post-colonial Africa impact on agricultural production and rural development broadly. The idea that Africa’s agrarian challenges today are shaped by the colonial social engineering was very central in Sam Moyo’s scholarship, whose life and work we are remembering and celebrating in this book. Chapters in this book were initially presented at a two-day colloquium in 2016, co-hosted by the Centre for African Studies
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