Necroclimatism in a Spectral World (Dis)order?
417 Pages
English
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Necroclimatism in a Spectral World (Dis)order?

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417 Pages
English

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Highlighting the problematiques of working with a narrow version of greenhouse effects or global warming, this book posits the theory of necroclimatism that encompasses broader versions of greenhouse effects and global warming. Conceiving cultures, societies, moral sensibilities, epistemologies, polities, economies, legal systems and religions of the formerly colonised peoples as greenhoused and entrapped in the heat of global apartheid and neo-colonialism, the book refuses to be confined to the pufferies of physical conceptualisations of greenhousing and global warming. Underlining the supposed disposability and dispensability of colonised peoples, the notion of necroclimatism explicates ways in which some people suffer various forms of death, which have increasingly become a feature of global apartheid and neo-colonialism that are cast in spectral sacrificial logics. Deemed to constitute disposable bodies, disposable cultures, disposable polities, disposable societies, disposable epistemologies, disposable religions, disposable laws and disposable economies, the sacrificed are, in the age of climate catastrophism, once again reminded that they ‘have duties to die’, to become extinct in order to save the global spaceship that is sinking due to climate change and global warming.
This book therefore argues that in a sacrificial world (dis)order, binaries between humans and animals, good and evil, moral and immoral, the dead and the living necessarily vanish in the nefarious logic of what marks the era of climate catastrophism and the attendant necroclimatism. The book further argues that a sacrificial world (dis)order is necessarily a posthumanist and postanthropocentric world (dis)order, which should be never granted space in African worlds and even beyond. The book thus, raises fundamental questions for African anticipatory regimes, and for this reason it is handy for scholars in political science, sociology, social anthropology, development studies, environmental studies, agricultural studies, legal studies, food science, geography, religious studies and decolonial fields of studies.

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Published by
Published 25 June 2019
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EAN13 9789956550111
Language English
Document size 3 MB

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global apartheid and neo-colonialism, the book refuses to be confined to
in spectral sacrificial logics. Deemed to constitute disposable bodies,
economies, the sacrificed are, in the age of climate catastrophism, once
warming. This book therefore argues that in a sacrificial world (dis)order,
The book further argues that a sacrificial world (dis)order is necessarily a posthumanist and postanthropocentric world (dis)order, which should be
decolonial fields of studies.
holds a PhD in Social Anthropology from the University of
in Sociology at the University of Namibia. His research interests include knowledge
member of CODESRIA since 2010, and a Research Fellow of the University of South
 is a Professor of Culture and Heritage Studies at Great Zimbabwe University in Zimbabwe. He holds a PhD in Social Anthropology from the University of Cape Town, South Africa.
Necroclimatism in a Spectral World (Dis)order?
Necroclimatism in a Spectral World (Dis)order? Rain Petitioning, Climate and Weather Engineering in 21st Century Africa
Edited by
Edited by Artwell Nhemachena & Munyaradzi Mawere
Necroclimatism in a Spectral World (Dis)order? Rain Petitioning, Climate and Weather Engineering in 21st Century Africa Edited by Artwell Nhemachena & Munyaradzi Mawere
L a ng a a R esea rch & P u blishing CIG Mankon, Bamenda
Publisher:LangaaRPCIG Langaa Research & Publishing Common Initiative Group P.O. Box 902 Mankon Bamenda North West Region Cameroon Langaagrp@gmail.comwww.langaa-rpcig.net Distributed in and outside N. America by African Books Collective orders@africanbookscollective.com www.africanbookscollective.com ISBN-10: 9956-550-46-9 ISBN-13: 978-9956-550-46-3 ©Artwell Nhemachena & Munyaradzi Mawere 2019All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, mechanical or electronic, including photocopying and recording, or be stored in any information storage or retrieval system, without written permission from the publisher
List of Contributors Artwell Nhemachenaholds a PhD in Social Anthropology; MSc in Sociology and Social Anthropology, BSc Honours Degree in Sociology. In addition to having a good mix of social science and law courses in his undergraduate studies, he also has a Certificate in Law and a Diploma in Education. He has lectured in Zimbabwe before pursuing his PhD studies in South Africa. His current areas of research interest are Knowledge Studies; Development Studies; Environment; Resilience; Food Security and Food Sovereignty; Industrial Sociology; Agnotology, Sociology and Social Anthropology of Conflict and Peace; Transformation; Sociology and Social Anthropology of Science and Technology Studies, Democracy and Governance; Relational Ontologies; Decoloniality and Anthropological/Sociological Jurisprudence. He has published over 80 book chapters and journal articles in accredited and peer-reviewed platforms. He has also published over fourteen books in accredited and peer reviewed platforms. At the University of Namibia, he chairs the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences Seminar Series on Researching, Writing and Publishing. Artwell Nhemachena is also a Research Fellow in the College of Humanities of the University of South Africa. He is also an active member of the Council for the Development of Social Science Research in Africa (CODESRIA). Munyaradzi Mawereis a Professor and Research Chair in the Simon Muzenda School of Arts, Culture and Heritage Studies at Great Zimbabwe University, in Zimbabwe. He holds a PhD in Social Anthropology from the University of Cape Town, South Africa; three Masters Degrees namely: Master of Arts Degree in Social Anthropology; Master of Arts Degree in Philosophy; Master of Arts Degree in Development Studies; a BA (Hons) Degree in Philosophy, and a number of certificates across disciplines. He is an author of more than 70 books and over 300 book chapters and peer-reviewed academic journals with a focus on Africa straddling the following areas: poverty and development, African philosophy, society and culture, democracy, human rights, politics of food production, humanitarianism and civil society organisations, indigenous
knowledge systems, urban anthropology, existential anthropology, cultural philosophy, environmental anthropology, society and politics, decoloniality and African studies. Professor Mawere’s research acumen has earned him prestigious international honours such as the Wenner-Gren Research Fellowship (2011-2014) and recently (2017), the much coveted Association of African Studies (ASA) Presidential Fellowship Award. He is a Senior Editorial Board Member and peer-reviewer for a number of publishing houses and journals, and has been involved in several research projects across disciplines. Some of his recently published (authored and edited/co-edited) books include: Humans, Other Beings and the Environment: Harurwa (Edible stinkbugs) and Environmental Conservation in South-eastern Zimbabwe;Theory, Knowledge, Development and Politics: What Role for the Academy in the Sustainability of Africa?;Democracy, Good Governance and Development in Africa: A Search for Sustainable Democracy and Development;Culture, Indigenous Knowledge and Development in Africa: Reviving Interconnections for Sustainable Development;Myths of Peace and Democracy? Towards Building Pillars of Hope, Unity and Transformation in Africa;Harnessing Cultural Capital for Sustainability: A Pan Africanist Perspective;Divining the Future of Africa: Healing the Wounds, Restoring Dignity and Fostering Development;African Cultures, Memory and Space: Living the Past Presence in Zimbabwean Heritage;Violence, Politics and Conflict Management in Africa: Envisioning Transformation, Peace and Unity in the Twenty-First Century; African Philosophy and Thought Systems: A Search for a Culture and Philosophy of Belonging;Africa at the Crossroads: Theorising Fundamentalisms in the 21st Century;Colonial Heritage, Memory and Sustainability in Africa: Challenges, Opportunities and Prospects;Underdevelopment, Development and the Future of Africa;Theorising Development in Africa: Towards Building an African Framework of Development; andHuman Trafficking and Trauma in the Digital Era: The Ongoing Tragedy of the Trade in Refugees from Eritrea. Takavafira Masarira Zhouholds a PhD in Environmental History. He is an environmental historian, a Lemba, trade unionist, and Human Rights defender. He is a holder of B.A. General, B.A. Special Honours in History, Masters in African History, Graduate Certificate in Education, and D. Phil in Environmental History from the University of Zimbabwe. He was a Teaching Assistant in the History Department at the University of Zimbabwe (1991-1995), a History
Lecturer at Mutare Teachers’ college (2002-2004), and a part-time History Lecturer at Africa University (2002-2004). As a History Lecturer at Great Zimbabwe (2004-2008) he helped to transform the history subject area into the Department of History and Development Studies. He was a technical advisor (researcher) in Zimbabwe Constitution Select Committee (2010-2011) that produced Zimbabwe’s new Constitution in 2013. He was also a member of the National Education Advisory Board (2009-2013) that among other things helped the then Ministry of Education, Sports, Arts and Culture in strategic planning, resource mobilisation and policy formulation during the period of Inclusive Government. Currently he is the president of the Progressive Teachers’ Union of Zimbabwe, and treasurer of the Non Aligned Teachers’ Unions of Southern Africa (ANTUSA). He has presented various papers at conferences in Zimbabwe, Africa, Europe and Asia. He has also published on African agriculture; white settler farming; environmental impact of mining in Zimbabwe; peace and security in Africa; History curricula changes in Zimbabwe; post-2016 Africa’s development; teacher education; poverty, natural resources and underdevelopment in Africa; poverty, conflict and vulnerability in Africa; and general history and politics of Zimbabwe. Wisdom Sibandais currently a PhD candidate in Geography at the University of the Free State, South Africa. He holds a Master of Science in Environmental Policy and Planning (UZ); Bachelor of Science in Politics and Administration (UZ); Diploma in Water and Sanitation; Certificates in Monitoring and Evaluation; Participatory Rural Appraisal; Rural Development; Participatory Health and Hygiene; Geographical Information System. Sibanda, a former Assistant District Administrator in the Local Government of Zimbabwe and Projects Officer at Culture Fund Zimbabwe Trust, has a vast experience of serving in the public service as well as in local and international NGOs in a wide range of programmes including Monitoring and Evaluation and emergency Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH). His research interests include community participation; Development and appraisal; Demand-led WASH programs; Water resources management; Environmental management; Climate change and disaster risk management.
Fortune Sibandaholds aPh.D.Heis an Associate Professor in the Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies, Simon Muzenda School of Arts, Culture and Heritage Studies, Great Zimbabwe University. He has widely published articles in refereed journals and book chapters on various themes from a religious perspective, which include the Environment and Climate Change, New Religious Movements, Land Question, Indigenous Ways of Knowing, Human rights issues and Power dynamics in the African context. He co-edited:Powerin Contemporary Zimbabwe (2018). Prof Sibanda is a member of the African Consortium for Law and Religion Studies (ACLARS), African Theological Institutions in Southern and Central Africa (ATISCA), Association for the Study of Religion in Southern Africa (ASRSA) and African Association for the Study of Religion (AASR).Semie M. Samais a Post-Doctoral fellow at McGill University and at the Centre for International Governance Innovation (CIGI), Canada, where she researches in the field of international environmental law, including climate law and policy. She is also a member of the McGill Centre for Human Rights and Legal Pluralism and The Tshepo Institute for the Study of Contemporary Africa. Her research focuses on legal and policy solutions to environmental issues. Her areas of interest include environmental law, climate change, sustainable development, constitutional law, human rights, investment law, and public policy. Dr. Sama holds a Ph.D. in law from the University of Ottawa; an LL.M. in global sustainability and environmental law from the University of Ottawa; an M.Sc. in ecotechnology and sustainable development from Mid Sweden University and Stockholm University; and an LL.B. from the University of Buea. Before joining the Centre for International Governance and McGill University, Dr. Sama was a UN Global Environment Outlook Fellow (during which she contributed to the SixthGlobal Environment Outlook GEO-6: Healthy Planet, Healthy People). She also worked for the University of Ottawa, Oxfam Canada and the Foundation for Environment and Development. Dr. Sama has received numerous awards and honours, including the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) of Canada Award, the IUCN Academy of Environmental Law Scholarship, the
University of Ottawa’s International Admission Scholarship and the Minister of Higher Education Honours Prize of the Government of Cameroon. Ignatius Gutsais currently a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Sociology at the University of Zimbabwe. He holds a PhD in Anthropology from the University of the Witwatersrand in South Africa, an MSc in Sociology and Social Anthropology and BSc (Hons) Sociology from the University of Zimbabwe. His research interests are in ageing, climate change, local knowledge systems, livelihoods and rural development. OluғwЭleғ TУғwЭғgboyeҒ Òkéwándé has been lecturing in the Department of Linguistics and Nigerian Languages, University of Ilorin, Ilrin, Nigeria since 1998. His research interests include the fields of African religions, semiotics, stylistics and culture. His Doctoral Thesis, “A Semiotic Investigation of Links betweenIfa̗,I̖beji̖andAyo̖Ѓlб̗pб̗n” is a study that establishesIfa̗’srelationship withAyo̖Ѓlб̗pб̗n andI̖beji̖codes, symbols, icons and indices. He has around published in reputable local, national and international journals. Nancy Mazurua lecturer in the De is partment of History, ArchaeologyDevelo and pment Studies at Great Zimbabwe University. She holds a Master of Science degree in Development Studies from Women's UniversityAfrica. Currentl in y, she is a Development Studies PhD candidate at the University of the Witwatersrand,Johannesburg, South Africa. Aaron Rwodziholds a PhD in History. He is currently a lecturer in the Department of History under the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences at the Catholic University of Zimbabwe. His areas of research interest include political and social history, democracy, ethnicity and culture. Nkwazi Mhangois a PhD candidate at the University of Manitoba, in Canada. He is the author ofSaa yaUkombozi, Nyuma ya Pazia,Souls on Sale, Born with Voice, Africa Reunite or Perish, Psalm of the Oppressed, Africa’s Best,Worst President: How Neocolonialism and Imperialism
Maintained Venal Rules in Africa,‘Is It Global War on Terrorism’ or Global War over Terra Africana?: The Ruse Imperial Powers Use to Occupy Africa Militarily for Economic Gains, Africa’s Dependency Syndrome: Can Africa Still Turn Things around for the Better?How Africa Developed Europe: Deconstructing the His-story of Africa, Excavating Untold Truth and What Ought to Be Done and Known. Also, Mhango has contributed many chapters to various scholarly books and he is a poet, teacher, columnist, Journalist, Peace and Conflict Scholar, and member of Writers’ Association of Newfoundland and Labrador (WANL), St. John’s, NL, Canada and an alumnus of Universities of Dar es Salaam (Tanzania), Menno Simons College at the University of Winnipeg and Arthur V. Mauro Centre at St. Paul College of Manitoba (Canada). Edmore Dubea PhD and he is a senior lecturer in the holds Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies, Great Zimbabwe University, Mashava Campus. He currently lectures in ethics in African indigenous religions, and has keen interest on how such ethics can lead to human flourishing. He shares a general interest on inter-religious dialogue envisaged by the contemporary world as a panacea to the problems of religious imperialism, as demonstrated by missionaries who disregarded indigenous taboos with utter impunity. He is convinced that genuine dialogue can enhance peace, stability and mutuality. He also has research interests on how religion may enhance public health as well as strengthen institutions of justice bent on serving the common good. Beatrice Lanternsenior lecturer in the Department of African is Languages and Culture at Great Zimbabwe University, Masvingo in Zimbabwe. She holds a Master of Arts Degree in African languages and culture from Midlands State University. Currently, she is studying for a PhD with the University of South Africa (UNISA). Her research interests are in language planning, onomastics, translation studies and indigenous knowledge systems. Alex Munyongais a philosophy of science education lecturer at Mkoba Teachers College and also a lecturer for ethics at The Catholic University of Zimbabwe’s Humanities Department. He holds an MA
in Philosophy, Special Honours Degree in Philosophy, B.A. (Philosophy and Religious Studies) and a Postgraduate Diploma in Education all from the University of Zimbabwe. Munyonga is an Ambassador of Peace with the IIFWP. His areas of interest are education in contemporary African society, applied ethics with special reference to environmental, social, business, political and clergy ethics. He is also interested in African metaphysics and the indigenous knowledge systems. His latest publication is a book chapter on the death penalty law in the context of xenophobic attacks in South Africa, 2008 and 2015; edited by Mangenaet al and published by the Verom Press, USA in 2018. Revd. Martin Mujingaholds a Ph.D. He is an Ordained Minister of the Methodist Church in Zimbabwe. He has taught at several theological institutions and Universities in Zimbabwe and South Africa. Dr. Mujinga is the author of three books. He has contributed articles in peer-reviewed journals. He has reviewed articles for journals. Mujinga has also written chapters for book publications. His research interest is in the healing ministry, African Spirituality, Methodist history and theology and the role of religion in transforming societies. He can be contacted at martinmujinga@gmail.com+263 772 207 033; +263 716 402 119 Tom Tomis aDoctoral Research Fellow under the South African Research Chair Initiative- Chair in Social Policy, College of Graduate Studies at the University of South Africa (UNISA); and Lecturer in the Department of Development Studies, Faculty of Applied Social Sciences, Zimbabwe Open University (ZOU). He is a sociologist whose research, publications and teaching focus on development sociology and social policy. His work revolves around enhancing people’s wellbeing. He is an active member of Young African Researchers in Agriculture (YARA) Network and the South African Sociological Association (SASA). Clement Chipendais a Doctoral Research Fellow under the South African Research Chair Initiative- Chair in Social Policy, College of Graduate Studies at the University of South Africa (UNISA). Having worked for the Government of Zimbabwe and several NGOs, he has