Peace Education for Violence Prevention in Fragile African Societies
416 Pages
English
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Peace Education for Violence Prevention in Fragile African Societies

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Learn more
416 Pages
English

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Though conflicts among (African) nations diminished at the end of the last millennium, the need for peace remains a perennial concern for African citizens within their communities and countries. Once again, Maphosa and Keasley have engaged a collection of scholar practitioners to address the query ‘What’s Going to Make a Difference in Contemporary Peace Education around Africa?’ The contributing authors draw from daily headlines as well as African literature to unearth twenty-first century quandaries with which educators in formal and informal contexts are called upon to grapple. The ‘What’s Going to Make a Difference’ authors offer insights to educators, peace education practitioners and parents for everyday living. The authors probe the wisdom of the recent and ancient past and bring forth pearls for contemporary moments. All in discerning effort to respond to the guiding question, the editors and their contributing colleagues deliver a compelling set of revelations for Making a Difference in Peace Education for African and world citizens.

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Published 29 December 2016
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EAN13 9780798305297
Language English
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Peace Education for Violence Prevention in Fragile African Societies What’s Going to Make a Difference?
Sylvester B. Maphosaand Alphonse Keasley (eds)
Peace Educatîon or Vîoence Preventîon în Arîcan Socîetîes What’s Going to Make a Difference?
First Published in 2016 by the Africa Institute of South Africa Private Bag X41 Pretoria South Africa, 0001 ISBN: 9780798304962
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TABLE OF CONTENTS
Acknowedgmentsi. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Preace. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ii
Edîtors’ bîographîesiv . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Notes on contrîbutors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v
Chapter 1 Introductîon: Peace Educatîon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 The Editors
PART I: The Changîng Context and Interactîon
Chapter 2 Towards a Unîversa Peace Educatîon în Arîca?21 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Boniface Bwanyire
Chapter 3 Teachîng the Past as î Peope Mattered. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 History Education as Peace Education in PostApartheid South Africa Fanie du Toit
Chapter 4 Contextua Specîicîty în Peace Educatîon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Magnus Haavelsrud
PART II: Rejectîng Chronîc Vîoence
Chapter 5 Chronîc Vîoence and Impîcatîons or Pedagogy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 Crispin Hemson
Chapter 6 Educatîon110 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Blame Shifting Must Stop! Phindile LukheleOlorunju
Chapter 7 Tradîtîona Approaches to Peace în Arîca134 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Examining the Efficacy of Strategies for Peace in a Refugee Context Tony Karbo
Chapter 8 Guns and Cows. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162 . The Role Played by the Government of Uganda and Civil Society Organisations to Disarm the Karimojong in Karamoja Sidonia Angom
PART III: Pîckîng up the Pîeces
Chapter 9 Usîng Impementatîon Scîence to Brîng Efectîve Socîa Emotîona Learnîng to Scae în Fragîe Arîcan Contexts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 191 Beverly Kingston
Chapter 10 Peace Educatîon Pedagogy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 221 Feminist and Intersectional Critical Thinking on Teaching and Learning Pamela Machakanja
Chapter 11 Trees, Poems and Drama to Create Relexîve Spaces or Peacebuîdîng în Schoos243. . . . . . . Yvonne Sliep and Lynn Norton
Chapter 12 ‘We can’t wak aone’. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 275 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Giving Voice to Children’s Fears Yvonne Sliep, Lynn Norton and Nirmala Gopal
PART IV: Desîgnîng or Peace Educatîon
Chapter 13 Maînstreamîng Peace Educatîon în Unîversîty Currîcuum307. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Assumptions, Approaches and Achievements of this Model in Zimbabwe Martha Mutisi
Chapter 14 Educatîon or Peace and Socîa Cohesîon în a Mutîcutura Socîety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 331 Observations from Kunene Region, Namibia Olga Bialostocka
Chapter 15 Transormatîon Educatîon. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 357 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Interrogating the Utility of Conflict Transformation Theory in Peace Education in Pla teau State, Nigeria Dorcas Ettang
Chapter 16 Concusîon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 384 The Editors
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Acknowledgements
This is the work of many people. Our deepest appreciation goes to the con-tributors to this anthology. They are internationally recognised scholars and practitioners in community-based peacebuilding, and it is our honour (as editors) to include their work. Friends, there are no words to thank you for the invaluable contributions you made to this undertaking. Without you, it would not have been possible to harness this wealth of learning. The initial impetus, for which we are most grateful, is our preceding bookBuilding Peace from Within: An Examination of Peace-building and Transition in Africa, which has held its promise and helpfulness to prac-titioners and continues to be well received in scholarly and policy circles. We are thankful to the Africa Institute of South Africa (AISA) programme of the Human Sciences Research Council (HSRC), which has been instru-mental at every stage of the development of this volume. The support and encouragement are greatly appreciated – including the peace education col-loquy of November 2013 in Pretoria, the peace education panel at the Africa Renaissance conference of May 2014, and hosting the research Fellow Al-phonse Keasley, from the University of Colorado Boulder, for this project. We are indebted to HSRC-AISA publications staff, who helped us transform this work from mere manuscript pages typed on our computers. Many thanks for numerous administrative functions are extended to all HSRC-AISA staff, including Simamkele Bokolo, Mamelo Theledi and Lizzy Motaung. We would also like to acknowledge the support of the Fulbright Program: Sylvester Maphosa, Chief Research Specialist at HSRC-AISA and project leader, was in residence (Fulbright Scholar-in-Residence) at the University of Colorado Boulder (CU-B) during part of writing this work. Part of his residency involved working on this compilation. The Fulbright Program also supported this undertaking through the Fulbright Specialist Award on be-half of the HSRC-AISA to Alphonse Keasley, project collaborator, specifically for this project.
Preface
Building Peace from Within: An Examination of Peace-building and Transi-tion in Africa precedes the volume that you are about to peruse. It was a breakthrough volume for its editors, Drs Sylvester B. Maphosa, Laura DeLuca and Alphonse Keasley, because it solidified our commitment to a greater contemporary understanding of theUbuntusystem. value Peace from Withinserved as the impetus for this current volume and for also future volumes. Not surprisingly, as we were finalisingPeace from Within, the question ‘What’s next?’ surfaced. Though born a generation apart in very different circumstances and geographic locations – Maphosa in Zimbabwe and Keas-ley in the United States – we learned of each other’s deep commitment to Ubuntu: ‘I am because we are,’ and ‘humanity toward others.’ While not explicitly articulated in any of this book’s chapters, it is this concept that propelled us to undertake this audacious volume, in which we ask the bold question, ‘What’s going to make a difference in contemporary peace educa-tion in Africa?’ Indeed, as editors, like many scholar-practitioners, we are driven by asking big questions. Nevertheless, our audacity to undertake this effort entered through our presumption that we might identify the seminal elements for the ideal peace education pedagogy. In some sense, we believe that ifUbuntuis to be actualised in contemporary times, it is essential that we persist in developing our understanding and seek time-commensurate approaches to living out our ‘humanity toward others.’ As the translation ofUbuntucommunicates, a community of clearly people is integral to the concept. For us, situating peace education in for-mal and informal learning environments is another essential component for addressing our question, ‘What’s going to make a difference in peace education in fragile African contexts?’ We contend that people-to-people interactions are the bedrock of substantive, long-lasting peacebuilding intelligence. Moreover, we hold that such peacebuilding intelligence must become one of the values that young Africans – indeed all youth – learn and embrace early in life. The irrefutable fact is that learning is an endur-ing process through every stage of our lives, and, thus, peace education is essential for humankind’s long-term best interest! The interactions during the Peace Education Colloquium in November 2013 signalled that the book’s concept was feasible and worthy of pur-suit. The contributors brought tremendous richness to each other as they
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suggested changes to each scholar for achieving the goal of the volume. As editors, we then had to only reiterate our expectations that the chap-ters needed to lend themselves to both theory-making and advanced peace education practices. Within our editorial responses to drafts of chapters, we were unrelenting in our drive for theory because we genuinely desire to push the envelope in promoting peace-building intelligence in every sector in Africa. We fully expect each contributor’s ideas and insights to generate additional expansive concepts. Above all, as editors we have learned and grown. And, given that there is no silver bullet, this volume is therefore not a seminal volume, but rather the beginning of a much longer process of working together to engender structural peace.
The Editors
Editors’ biographies
Sylvester B. Maphosa, PhD,is the Chief Research Specialist in Governance and Security at the Human Sciences Research Council (HSRC) in Pretoria, South Africa. He holds a PhD in Conflict Resolution and Peace Studies and an MA in Peace and Governance. Maphosa has extensive professional and academic experience regarding conflict resolution and community-based peacebuilding. He has held teaching and research positions on these sub-jects in the United States, Ethiopia, Zimbabwe and South Africa. He is the author and editor of numerous scholarly articles and books, including Building Peace from Within: An Examination of Community-based Peace-building and Transitions in Africa. Maphosa is a Fulbright S-I-R Fellow Alumni. SMaphosa@hsrc.ac.za
 Alphonse Keasley, PhD,has had a career spent almost exclusively as an American higher education professional since the age of 22, when he accepted his first faculty position at Oklahoma State University. Since 1974, Keasley has enjoyed an illustrious professional life at the University of Colorado Boulder (CU-B), as a doctoral student and graduate, faculty member, mid-level manager, and currently as Assistant Vice Chancellor. He introduced several innovative classes in the CU-B Honors Program, Lead-ership Certificate Program, the McNair Program (regarding undergraduate research) and the CU-B Study Abroad Program. Through the Study Abroad Program, he has brought CU-B students to South Africa for Global Seminars at the University of Cape Town and research projects at the Africa Institute of South Africa (AISA). Keasley is a Fulbright Specialist and an AISA Re-search Fellow Alumni. His academic reach is also evident in more than fifty educational DVDs produced by Centre Communication and Ambrose Digital. Alphonse.keasley@colorado.edu
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