Taking a Stand
175 Pages
English

Taking a Stand

-

175 Pages
English

Description

> Print review campaign to progressive and peace journals > Course Adoption mailing to Peace & conflict studies, etc

The next step for activists ready to go beyond petitions and demonstrations to work for peace.

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Published 01 March 2009
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EAN13 9781550923278
Language English
Document size 1 MB

Legal information: rental price per page €. This information is given for information only in accordance with current legislation.

Exrait

Advance praise for
TAKING A STAND
Taking a Stand is an excellent book. It gives both practical help
and inspiration to all those peace activists with generous and courageous
hearts who are willing to take risks for peace.
— Mairead Corrigan Maguire, Nobel Peace Laureate
I greet the appearance of this book with renewed hope for the world.
Taking a Stand is written with the excitement — impassioned and
inspirational — that such a stirring subject deserves. After reading
this book, no one can fail to realize that peace teams are real;
they are here, and here to stay. I dare to dream that we are
hearing in these pages the death knell of war.
— Michael Nagler, founder of the Peace and Confl ict Studies
Program at UC, Berkeley and author of The Search for a Nonviolent Future:
A Promise of Peace for Ourselves, our Families and our World
Taking a Stand fi lls an important gap in the literature on nonviolence.
It serves as a manual for the growing number of conscientious people
considering becoming part of nonviolent interventions in confl ict regions
abroad. Through fi rst-person accounts, Elizabeth Boardman gives readers
a feel for what motivates people to make such a commitment for peace and
justice, and what such an experience might be like, and gives a frank account
of both the challenges and the fulfi llment of making such a powerful and
important personal witness.
— Stephen Zunes, Professor of Politics, Chair of Peace & Justice
Studies, University of San Francisco, and author of Tinderbox: U.S. Middle
East Policy and the Roots of TerrorismWith Taking a Stand, Elizabeth Boardman provides a valuable book for
anyone contemplating nonviolent resistance solidarity work.
— Starhawk, author of The Spiral Dance, The Fifth Sacred Thing,
Webs of Power, and The Earth PathTAKING A STANDTAKING A STAND
A GUIDE TO PEACE TEAMS
and ACCOMPANIMENT PROJECTS
ELIZABETH F. BOARDMAN
New Society PublishersCataloging in Publication Data:
A catalog record for this publication is available from the
National Library of Canada.
Copyright © 2005 by Elizabeth Boardman.
All rights reserved.
Cover design by Diane MacIntosh.
Cover Images: Top Photo, Laura Beck. Bottom
Photo, Laura Miller <www.lauramiller.net>
Printed in Canada . First printing May 2005.
Paperback ISBN: 0-86571-526-2
Inquiries regarding requests to reprint all or part of Taking a Stand
should be addressed to New Society Publishers at the address below.
To order directly from the publishers, please add $5.00 shipping
to the price of the fi rst copy, and $1.00 for each additional copy
(plus GST in Canada). Send check or money order to:
New Society Publishers
P. O. Box 189, Gabriola Island, BC V0R 1X0, Canada
1-800-567-6772
New Society Publishers’ mission is to publish books that contribute
in fundamental ways to building an ecologically sustainable and just
society, and to do so with the least possible impact on the environment,
in a manner that models this vision. We are committed to doing this
not just through education, but through action. We are acting on our
commitment to the world’s remaining ancient forests by phasing out
our paper supply from ancient forests worldwide. This book is one step
towards ending global deforestation and climate change. It is printed on
acid-free paper that is 100% old growth forest-free (100% post-consumer
recycled), processed chlorine free, and printed with vegetable based, low
VOC inks. For further information, or to browse our full list of books
and purchase securely, visit our website at: www.newsociety.com
New Society Publishers www.newsociety.comThis book is for Hilary and Ken and Stephen
and other people committed to peace and justice
who might some day join a peace team or an accompaniment project.
This book is for all those who have wondered what more they
can do to help rid the world of violence and inequity. Contents
Acknowledgments
Introduction ..................................................................................................... 1
Chapter 1: Why Go? ........................................................................................ 5
Taking a stand. Chickening out. Galvanizing forces. Individual examples.
Chapter 2: Go where and do what? ......................................................15
Reasons. Delegations. Peace teams.
Accompaniment projects. Real-life examples.
Chapter 3: What will people say? ............................................................25
“Coming out” as a peace activist. Challenges and reactions.
Talking to people from different groups. More hard questions.
Chapter 4: Isn’t it dangerous? ...................................................................39
Fear and grace. Limelight and stage fright. Traveling in
a strange land. Dangers. When should we leave?
Chapter 5: Who will know or care? .........................................................51
Variations. Specifi c roles for supporters. Moral support. Logistical support.
Publicity management. So many are involved. Others who care.
Chapter 6: Learning about soldiers ........................................................65
Reading about soldiers. Real soldiers and real guns. Soldiers for peace.Chapter 7: Christian Peacemaker Teams ..............................................87
Overview. Organization Training. The application process. What
CPT provides. Language. Room, board and guidance. Short-term
delegations. Expenses and spending money. Civil disobedience. Danger.
Sharing the news. Headquarters. Demographics. Destinations.
Chapter 8: Voices in the Wilderness .......................................................97
Overview. Background. The application process. Training. Language.
Room, board and guidance. Expenses and spending money. Civil
disobedience. Danger. Sharing the news. Headquarters. Demographics.
Chapter 9: Peace Brigades International .......................................... 113
Overview. Organization. Background. The application process.
Training, What PBI provides. Language. Room, board and
guidance. Danger. Headquarters. Demographics.
Chapter 10: Other travelers, other work ............................................ 123
International Solidarity Movement. Friends Peace Teams. American
Friends Service Committee. Fellowship of Reconciliation. Services
International para la Paz. Reality tours and delegations. Humanitarian
aid. Radical fringe. Other work.
Chapter 11: The way of the future ....................................................... 137
Challenges and rewards. Questions about effectiveness. Organizational
weaknesses. The role of the technology. The way of the future: Nonviolent
Peaceforce.
Appendix. Contact Information
Cotact information for all organizations mentioned ................................... 147
Annotated Resources ............................................................................... 149
Index .............................................................................................................. 155
About the Author ...................................................................................... 161Acknowledgments
Joan Powell, editor of a Food First compendium of information about
alternatives to the Peace Corps, provided crucial technical and moral support.
Published author Carol Verburg offered editorial assistance. Peaceworkers in
San Francisco agreed to act as fi scal agent.
People who were especially helpful in supporting my trip and
implementing the book project include Claudia Boudreau, who stayed
with me the scary night before I left for Iraq, and Marilee Eusebio, who
met me at the airport the night I came back. Mary deLap managed my
e-mail correspondence, including wide distribution of seven reports written
before, during, and after my stay in Iraq. Lots of important information
for the book was provided by peace team leaders Kathy Kelly, Gabe
Huck, John Farrell, Angela Garcia, Danny Muller, Laurie Hasbrook and
Ramzi Kysia from Voices in the Wilderness; Claire Evans from Christian
Peacemaker Teams; Andrew Miller, Emma Eastwood and Jonathan
Woodbridge from Peace Brigades International; Val Liveoak from Friends
Peace Teams; and Mary Murphy, Kevin Danaher, Tim Kingston and Malia
Everette from Global Exchange.
I am a computer klutz, so thank goodness for Simon Tse and Martin
Taras, who provided extensive technical assistance. Gloria Valoris, Faith
Child, David Hartsough, and Marie Schutz read and critiqued parts or
all of the book, and I followed most of their suggestions. Joan Powell did a stellar job of copyediting. Marie Schutz, Victor Staadecker and Peaceworkers
provided vital fi nancial support.
Others whose moral support and expertise was important are Krista
Barnard, Carol Bly, Joanne Clapp-Fullager, Dino DiDonato, Jan Hartsough,
Sharon Kufeldt, Ted Sexauer, Bob Siedle-Khan, Wolf Sterling, Karen
Topakian and Carol Verberg.
David Hartsough of Peaceworkers, which undergirds the Nonviolent
Peaceforce, was standing right behind me with encouragement, information,
and guidance from the fi rst day the idea of going to Iraq sprang into my
mind.
Hey, it takes a village!
- Elizabeth Boardman, 2005Introduction
What this is all about
This handbook is intended to give a fi rst glimpse into what it would be like to
travel to another country in the name of peace, to stand against the violent, to
stand by the brave, to take a real and serious stand for justice.
This book started with my three-week trip to Iraq in December 2002
with the Iraq Peace Team sponsored by Voices in the Wilderness. For a
Quaker woman who runs programs for frail and disabled elders in the
Tenderloin in San Francisco, pre-war Baghdad made for an unusual vacation.
But I could not bear to sit safe at home while my country prepared to sacrifi ce
its own young men and women in a war against other innocent people.
My schooling taught me to think as a sociologist and historian; I began
right away to think about peace teams and accompaniment projects as an
interesting historical development within the peace movement.
When I returned home after the trip to Baghdad, it was challenging and
interesting to talk about Iraq with groups of many kinds. Audiences were
responsive and eager for information about Iraq, but they also shifted focus
soon to the peace team experience itself. Trying to imagine such a venture for
themselves, people would ask about the details of the experience. What was the
application process? How much did the trip cost? Where did the team stay?
Did members know each other before they went? What did your boss, staff
and family think of it all? Were you afraid? Do you think it was worth it?
1 2 Taking a Stand
Realizing that I already had contacts with a variety of faith-based and
non-sectarian peace activists, I decided to try to pull together a book about
American peace teams and accompaniment projects that would answer
these questions. My goal is to encourage more people to participate in such
activities.
The book draws on the rich demographic and organizational materials
already available from sponsoring agencies, including Voices in the Wilderness,
Christian Peacemaker Teams, Peace Brigades International, Friends Peace
Team and others. It includes references to a number of good studies already in
print about this kind of work. (See Bibliography) And, most important, there
are many excerpts and quotes from people of all ages who have participated in
such ventures in recent years.
In writing this book, I contacted many people personally about their
cross-border experiences, and most are quoted in this book. In later chapters,
you will learn more about them and the groups they traveled with. This is
their story as much as mine.
Iraq Peace Team
Like myself, several others on the Iraq Peace Team were fi rst timers. Paul
Chan, in his early thirties, is a photographer from New York City who took
a stunning collection of photographs, which have been shown all across the
United States. Micah Shristi was in Iraq while his young wife was in Colombia
with another peace team. Sixty-two year old Martin Edwards from California
was captivated by the people and the problems of Iraq, and shows every sign
of staying there permanently: he has married an Iraqi woman. Mary Burton
Risely, from New Mexico, was in Iraq during the early war protest, and Wade
Hudson, a semi-retired taxi driver and writer from northern California,
stayed in Baghdad right through the bombing. Charles Liteky, a former priest
in his seventies from San Francisco, spent months in Baghdad, including
some harrowing weeks at a potential bomb site, while his wife, Judy, waited
patiently at home. Cynthia Banas, a retired librarian from New York, spent
many months working in the Baghdad offi ce of Voices in the Wilderness,
and also stayed through the bombing.Introduction 3
However, most people on the Iraq team were tried-and-true stalwarts
with prior experience on peace teams and accompaniment projects. Steve
Clemens’ wife and teenage sons stayed behind in their ecumenical Christian
community in Minnesota; other times his wife is the one who travels with a
peace team. Ellen Barfi eld, vice president of Veterans for Peace, probably in
her forties, left her husband at home in New Jersey again for this third or
fourth trip to Iraq. Gabe Huck was a stalwart at the Chicago offi ce of Voices,
and he and his wife, Theresa Kubalik had been to Iraq several times when I
met them in 2002. Of course Kathy Kelly herself, co-founder of Voices, had
been in Iraq for weeks at a time in protest against the economic sanctions two
or three times a year since 1996. Elizabeth “Rabia” Roberts and her husband,
Elias Amidon, in their sixties, have given up their home in Colorado in order
to travel around the world in a constant witness for peace and justice.
Some people with Christian Peacemaker Teams (CPT) commit to
annual stints with peace teams in whatever part of the world has a need. Peggy
and Art Gish, who live on a communal farm in Ohio and are ardent about
peace work, belong to CPT and spend part of every year in this work. Peggy
was in Iraq while Art was in Israel in late 2002. Cliff Kindy was coordinating
CPT work in Baghdad while I was there, and has done this kind of work
in many different places over the years. Alice McMechen from New York
traveled with a CPT delegation to Colombia in 2003, and Michele
NaarObed went with CPT to Iraq in 2003.
Members of Peace Brigades International (PBI) were generous in
reports about their travels. Lizzie Brock, from California, is a young woman
who has spent a lot of time in Colombia. She put me in touch with Denise
Cauchi, another Colombia activist, now living with her young children in
Australia. Karen Brandow has traveled with PBI and is using her experience
in counseling new team members. Heike Kammer, a young German woman,
is now into her fourth or fi fth year with SIPAZ in Chiapas after several stints
with PBI in other Central American countries.
Friends Peace Teams (FPT) are involved with the African Great Lakes
Initiative where Adrian Bishop and his wife, Rosalie Dance, from Baltimore
spent the summer of 2003.4 Taking a Stand
Angela Pinchero from Canada and Linda Sartor, from California, wrote
from Sri Lankan projects sponsored by the Nonviolent Peaceforce, and
David Hartsough of San Francisco has traveled the world in the course of
establishing that program.
Carin Anderson and Chris Moore-Backman are young Quakers from
San Francisco who have spent many months in Colombia with the Fellowship
of Reconciliation and other sponsors.
Tom Cahill, a rugged guy in his late fi fties from California, went to
Iraq during the war as a human shield. Fran Peavey, despite ever-increasing
physical disabilities that now have her using a wheelchair, has traveled to
many confl ict scenes, most recently to Bosnia with a group of women who
call themselves Crabgrass - they will spring up persistently in every nook
and cranny! Mary Ann McGivern was part of a peacekeeping presence in
Northern Ireland, and Ravi Chand is a corporal with the Marines who very
generously shared his perspective on Kuwait and Iraq via his emails to peace
activists in the US during spring 2003.
At-home supporters who are quoted in this book include my sister,
Emily Boardman; my friends Mary deLap, Donna Lockhardt, Andy Rose
and Jeanne Wright; my neighbors Kevin Janssen, Maureen McKenna and her
daughter, Kate; and my co-workers Hazel Lau, Fran Post, and John Tinloy.
Trich Lachman, correspondence coordinator for CPT member Peggy Gish,
is quoted, and there is a picture from the San Francisco Friends Meeting
featuring First Day School teacher Bruce Folsom with Simeon
LymanLevering and Raven Hill.
Iraqi citizens and American soldiers pictured in this book did not offer
their names but did give permission to be photographed.