Violence, Peace and Everyday Modes of Justice and Healing in Post-Colonial Africa
367 Pages
English
Gain access to the library to view online
Learn more

Violence, Peace and Everyday Modes of Justice and Healing in Post-Colonial Africa

-

Gain access to the library to view online
Learn more
367 Pages
English

Description

Violence in its various proportions, genres and manifestations has had an enduring historical legacy the world over. However, works speaking to approaches aimed at mitigating violence characteristic of Africa are very limited. As some scholars have noted, Africans have experienced cycles of violence since the pre-colonial epoch, such that overt violence has become banalised on the African continent. This has had the effect of generating complex results, legacies and perennial emotional wounds that call for healing, reconciliation, justice and positive peace. Yet, in the absence of systematic and critical approaches to the study of violence on the continent, discourses on violence would hardly challenge the global matrices of violence that threaten peace and development in Africa.
This volume is a contribution in the direction of such urgently needed systematic and critical approaches. It interrogates, from different angles and with inspiration from a multidisciplinary perspective, the contentious production and resilience of violence in Africa. It calls for a paradigm shift – an alternative approach that forges and merges African customary dispute resolution and Western systems of dispute resolution – towards a framework of positive peace, holistic restoration, sustainable development and equity. The book is a welcome contribution to students and practitioners in security studies, African studies, development studies, global studies, policy studies, and political science.

Subjects

Informations

Published by
Published 06 February 2019
Reads 0
EAN13 9789956550326
Language English
Document size 4 MB

Legal information: rental price per page 0.0075€. This information is given for information only in accordance with current legislation.

Exrait

Violence, Peace & Everyday Modes of
Violence, Peace & Everyday Modes of Justice and Healing in Post-Colonial Africa
EDITEDBY Ngonidzashe Marongwe, Fidelis Peter Thomas Duri & Munyaradzi Mawere
Violence, Peace & Everyday Modes of Justice and Healing in Post-Colonial Africa Edited by Ngonidzashe Marongwe, Fidelis Peter Thomas Duri & Munyaradzi Mawere L a ng a a R esea rch & P u blishing CIG Mankon, Bamenda
Publisher:LangaaRPCIG Langaa Research & Publishing Common Initiative Group P.O. Box 902 Mankon Bamenda North West Region Cameroon Langaagrp@gmail.comwww.langaa-rpcig.net Distributed in and outside N. America by African Books Collective orders@africanbookscollective.com www.africanbookscollective.com ISBN-10: 9956-550-42-6 ISBN-13: 978-9956-550-42-5 ©Ngonidzashe Marongwe, Fidelis Peter Thomas Duri & Munyaradzi Mawere 2019All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, mechanical or electronic, including photocopying and recording, or be stored in any information storage or retrieval system, without written permission from the publisher
List of Contributors Ngonidzashe Marongweis a Lecturer in the History and Development Studies Department, Simon Muzenda School of Arts, Culture and Heritage Studies, Great Zimbabwe University located in Masvingo City, Zimbabwe. He holds a PhD in African History from the University of the Western Cape (UWC), South Africa. He is a past Andrew Mellon Foundation Doctoral Fellow at the Centre for Humanities Research, UWC (2009–2010 & 2012); and a SEPHIS fellow at the Centre for the Study of Culture and Society, Bangalore, India (2011). His research interests include African governance, political violence, gender, military history and terrorism. Ngonidzashe has edited several books such asMyths of Peace and Democracy: Towards Building Pillars of Hope, Unity and Transformation in Africa (2016);Violence, Politics and Conflict Management in Africa: Envisioning Transformation, Peace and Unity in the Twenty-First Century(2016); andContested Spaces, Restrictive Mechanisms and Corridors of Opportunity: A Social History of Zimbabwean Borderlands and Beyond since the Colonial Period(2018).Fidelis Peter Thomas Duriis a Senior Lecturer in the Department of History and Development Studies at Great Zimbabwe University in Zimbabwe. He is a holder of a PhD in History from the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, South Africa. He has particular interest in the field of social history. He has published a number of books and articles which focus on environmental history, socio-cultural dynamics, subaltern struggles, African border studies and politics in Zimbabwe during the colonial and post-colonial periods. He has also reviewed and edited a number of scholarly books and articles and is also a member of the editorial boards of international journals such as theZimbabwe Journal of Historical Studiesand theInternational Journal of Developing Societies. Munyaradzi Mawereis a Professor in the Simon Muzenda School of Arts, Culture and Heritage Studies at Great Zimbabwe University in Zimbabwe. He holds a Ph. D in Social Anthropology, Master’s
Degree in Social Anthropology, Master’s Degree in Development Studies, Master’s Degree in Philosophy and, a B. A (Hons) Degree in Philosophy. Before joining this university, Professor Mawere was a lecturer at the University of Zimbabwe and at Universidade Pedagogica, Mozambique, where he has worked in different capacities as a senior lecturer, assistant research director, postgraduate co-ordinator, and professor. He is an author of more than 70 books and over 250 academic publications with a focus on Africa straddling the following areas: poverty and development, African philosophy, society and culture, democracy, politics of food production, humanitarianism and civil society organisations, urban anthropology, existential anthropology, cultural philosophy, area studies, experimental philosophy, environmental anthropology, society and politics, decoloniality and African studies. Some of his bestselling books are: Humans, Other Beings and the Environment: Harurwa (Edible stinkbugs) and Environmental Conservation in South-eastern Zimbabwe(2015);Theory, Knowledge, Development and Politics: What Role for the Academy in the Sustainability of Africa? (2016);Democracy, Good Governance and Development in Africa: A Search for Sustainable Democracy and Development, (2015);Culture, Indigenous Knowledge and Development in Africa: Reviving Interconnections for Sustainable Development(2014);Myths of Peace and Democracy? Towards Building Pillars of Hope, Unity and Transformation in Africa(2016);Cultural Capital for Harnessing Sustainability: A Pan Africanist Perspective(2015);the Future of Divining Africa: Healing the Wounds, Restoring Dignity and Fostering Development,(2014);African Cultures, Memory and Space: Living the Past Presence in Zimbabwean Heritage(2014);Violence, Politics and Conflict Management in Africa: Envisioning Transformation, Peace and Unity in the Twenty-First Century(2016); African Philosophy and Thought Systems: A Search for a Culture and Philosophy of Belonging (2016);Africa at the Crossroads: Theorising Fundamentalisms in the 21st Century(2017);Colonial Heritage, Memory and Sustainability in Africa: Challenges, Opportunities and Prospects(2016);Underdevelopment, Development and the Future of Africa(2017), and Theorising Development in Africa: Towards Building an African Framework of Development (2017);African Studies in the Academy: The Cornucopia of Theory, Praxis and Transformation in Africa?(2017);GMOs, Consumerism and the Global Politics of Biotechnology: Rethinking Food, Bodies and Identities st in Africa’s 21 Century(2017);Human Trafficking and Trauma in the Digital
Era: The Ongoing Tragedy of the Trade in Refugees from Eritrea(2017);The Political Economy of Poverty, Vulnerability & Disaster Risk Management: Building Bridges of Resilience, Entrepreneurship and Development in Africa’s st 21 Century(2018); andJostling Between “Mere Talk” and Blame Game? Beyond Africa’s Poverty and Underdevelopment Game Talk(2018).James Hlongwanais a Senior Lecturer of History in the Department of History and Development Studies at Great Zimbabwe University. He holds a Master’s Degree in History from the Midlands State University in Zimbabwe. He is currently a PhD candidate in the Department of History at the University of North West in South Africa. Hlongwana has written several articles in international journals. His research interests concern conflict and borderland issues. Nancy Mazuruis a Lecturer in the Department of History, Archaeology and Development Studies at Great Zimbabwe University. She holds a Master of Science degree in Development Studies from the Women's University in Africa. Currently, she is a PhD candidate for Development Studies at the Universitythe of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg. Conrad Chibango is a Senior Lecturer of Religious Studies in the Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies at Great Zimbabwe University. He is interested in analysing religious and social policies and practices in contemporary developing societies. His work is mainly shaped by his particular interest in the interaction between religion and development as well as between religion and law. He is a PhD holder in Canon Law with the Pontifical Urban University, Rome, and a Master of Development Studies with the University of KwaZulu-Natal. He attained a BA Honours in Religious Studies at the University of Zimbabwe. Outside his academic activities, Conrad Chibango is a member of the Catholic Commission for Justice and Peace (CCJP) where he is actively involved in promoting social justice in grassroots communities.
Tobias Marevesais a New Testament Lecturer in the Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies, under the Simon Muzenda School of Arts and Humanities at the Great Zimbabwe University where he teaches New Testament Studies and New Testament Greek. He is pursuing doctoral studies at the University of Pretoria in South Africa. His areas of interest are New Testament studies and politics, Pentecostal expressions in Zimbabwean Christianity, culture, human rights, and gender-based violence. He has also published in the area of New Testament studies and conflict-resolution in the Zimbabwean political landscape. He has attended and presented a number of papers in both regional and international conferences and has published articles in reputable international journals. He is a member of the New Testament Society of Southern Africa (NTSSA), Reading Association of Nigeria (RAN), Association for the Study of Religion in Southern Africa (ASRSA), African Consortium for Law and Religion Studies (ACLARS), and the International Consortium for Law and Religion Studies (ICLARS). He is serving as an External Examiner in a number of Teachers’ Colleges in Zimbabwe. Prosper Hellen Tloua Lecturer in the African Languages is Department at the Great Zimbabwe University. She received her Master of Arts and Bachelor of Arts Honours degrees from the University of Venda (UNIVEN), Bachelor of Arts Degree at Great Zimbabwe University and is teaching Tshivenda language at Great Zimbabwe University. She currently serves as a Tshivenda coordinator in the Department of African Languages and Literature. Her research interests include Linguistics, Onomastics and Sociolinguistics. David Tobiasis a Lecturer in the History and Development Studies Department at Great Zimbabwe University, Masvingo, Zimbabwe. He is a holder of a Bachelor of Arts degree obtained with the University of Zimbabwe. He further graduated with a Master’s degree in African History from the Midlands State University. Currently he is working on his PhD proposal on the Zimbabwean land reform and agrarian issues. Tobias is a prolific writer and publisher. He has written several articles and book chapters on Zimbabwean political violence, effects of economic sanctions in
Zimbabwe, xenophobic attacks in South Africa, globalisation and inequalities. Jacob Tagarirofais a Lecturer and Coordinator for Peace, Conflict and Governance in the Department of Sociology at Great Zimbabwe University, Masvingo, Zimbabwe. His current research interests concentrate on gender and conflict in the post-colony. Over the years, he has contributed several chapters in books and has published numerous articles in, amongst others,International Journal of Politics and Governance. He holds a BSC in Sociology from Great Zimbabwe University and an MA in Development Studies from the University of the Western Cape, South Africa. He is currently studying for his PhD in African Studies (Gender, Peace and Conflict) with the University of the Free State, South Africa Erasmus Masiterais a Lecturer in the Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies at the Great Zimbabwe University, Masvingo. He holds a DPhil in Philosophy from the University of Pretoria, South Africa. Erasmus is interested in researches that deal with traditional African social and political issues and connected philosophies. He has also published widely in the stated areas. Tinashe Mawereholds a PhD in Women’s and Gender Studies from the University of the Western Cape (UWC), an MA in African and Diasporan Literature in English and a BA Honours in English and Communication from the Midlands State University (MSU), Zimbabwe. He is a past Andrew Mellon Doctoral Fellow in the Programme on the Study of the Humanities in Africa (PSHA) at the Centre for Humanities Research (CHR) at the UWC. He joined the UWC Writing Centre in 2011 as a Writing Consultant and has been working there to date. He does part-time lecturing on Academic Literacies, Language and Communication at the UWC and the Cape Peninsula University of Technology (CPUT). He is also a part-time Researcher and Editor at the South African History Online (SAHO). He has also taught Communication Skills and English as a Foreign Language at MSU. Currently, he is a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Pretoria.
Steyn Khesani Madlomeis a Full-time Lecturer at Great Zimbabwe University in the Simon Muzenda School of Arts, Culture and Heritages Studies, African Languages and Literature Department. He holds a PhD degree in Xitsonga, Masters of Arts in Xitsonga from the University of Venda, Bachelor of Arts degree from Great Zimbabwe University and a Diploma in Education from Mutare Teachers college. His areas of research are applied linguistics, culture, indigenous knowledge systems and Afrocentricity. Osborn Risimati Chaukeholds a PhD in Xitsonga from the University of the North. He was born in Xifaxani village under chief Xikundu in 1964. He attended the following schools: Shikundu Secondary (J C), Ripambeta High, Lemana High and Giyani High in 1985 (Matriculation). He obtained BA Paed in 1989, then BA Hons (1990). He taught at Shikundu High School before being employed as a lecturer at Lemana College of Education in 1993. Chauke obtained his MA at RAU in 1998. He was the first student to graduate with a PhD in the Department of Xitsonga in 2004 at University of the North. Chauke became a grade 12 examiner for a long time. He wrote the following books: Gama ra nsele (novel), Swa Chavisa (drama), Vutomi, Tihove and Torha emananga (poetry antologies), Vutomi i Rimpfani (poetry), Mahlo ya nkwahle (drama), Magandlati (novel), Tshwana hi rihanti (novel) Migiringiriko ya Xitsonga (Language), A hi tinyungubyiseni Giredi ya 9-12 and a Vatsonga Documentary (co-authored) shown on SABC TV 2. Chauke OR is also well known for being one of the writers of a soapie called MINA HI MINA which won an MTN top award.
Table of Contents Chapter 1 Violence, peace and everyday modes of justice and healing: Whither post-colonial Africa? An Introduction.................................................... 1 Ngonidzashe Marongwe; Fidelis Peter Thomas Duri &Munyaradzi Mawere Part I: The Scourge of Violence in Post-Colonial Africa ....................................... 29 Chapter 2 The Zimbabwean democratization paradox: Popular protests, violence, and state responses, 2013-2016 ................................................. 31 David Tobias and Jacob TagarirofaChapter 3 Violent house demolitions in Harare, Zimbabwe, 2014-2016: A violation of people’s rights............................................. 49 Nancy MazuruChapter 4 Female rapists and sperm harvesting: Narratives of violence and occultism in post-colonial Zimbabwe ............................................... 73 Ngonidzashe Marongwe, David Tobias & Tinashe Mawere
ix