What Colonialism Ignored
390 Pages
English
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What Colonialism Ignored

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Gain access to the library to view online
Learn more
390 Pages
English

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As Julius Nyerere once noted, Africa has largely been the continent of peace, though this fact has not been widely publicised. In reality, Africa possesses dynamic potentials for resolving contradictions and violent ruptures that colonial authorities, post-colonial states and global actors have failed to capture and capitalise upon. Drawing on the everyday experience of rural and urban people in Zimbabwe, South Africa, Namibia and Zambia, this book brings into conversation leading Japanese scholars of Southern Africa with their African colleagues. The result is an exploration in comparative perspective of the fascinating richness of bottom-up 'African potentials' for conflict resolution in Southern Africa, a region burdened with the legacy of settler capitalism and contemporary neoliberalism. The book is a pacesetter on how to think and research Africa in fruitful collaboration and with an ear to the nuances and complexities of the dynamic and lived realities of Africans.

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Published 02 March 2016
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EAN13 9789956763757
Language English
Document size 2 MB

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in comparative perspective of the fascinating richness of bottom-up ‘African potentials’ for conLict resolution in
What Colonialism Ignored: ‘African Potentials’ for Resolving Conflicts in Southern Africa
Edited by Sam Moyo & Yoichi Mine
In collaboration
L a ng a a R P CIG M a nk on B a m end a
CAAS Kyoto U niversity
Publisher: LangaaRPCIG Langaa Research & Publishing Common Initiative Group P.O. Box 902 Mankon Bamenda North West Region Cameroon Langaagrp@gmail.com www.langaa-rpcig.netIn Collaboration with The Center for African Area Studies, Kyoto University, Japan Distributed in and outside N. America by African Books Collective orders@africanbookscollective.com www.africanbookscollective.com ISBN: 9956-763-39-X ©Sam Moyo & Yoichi Mine 2016All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, mechanical or electronic, including photocopying and recording, or be stored in any information storage or retrieval system, without written permission from the publisher
This book is dedicated to the fond memory of Professor Sam Moyo (1954–2015). Yoichi Mine and all contributors
About the Contributors Sam Moyo1 and 2) was Executive Director of the (Chapters African Institute for Agrarian Studies (AIAS), Harare, and former President of the Council for the Development of Social Research in Africa (CODESRIA, 2009–11). He was Editor-in-Chief ofAgrarian South: Journal of Political EconomyIndia) and the author and (Sage editor of books including:Reclaiming the Land (Zed Books, 2005); African Land Questions, Agrarian Transitions and the State (Codesria 2008);Land and Sustainable Development in Africa (Zed Books, 2008);Reclaiming the NationPress, 2011); and (Pluto Land and Agrarian Reform in Zimbabwe: Beyond White-Settler Capitalism (Codesria, 2013). The present volume has turned out to be one of his major posthumous works due to his untimely death in Delhi, India, in November 2015. Yoichi Mine1 and 7) is Professor at the Graduate (Chapters School of Global Studies, Doshisha University, Japan. His major research fields are human security, human development, transnational migration, comparative history and African area study. He has published several award-winning Japanese books on development and conflict resolution in Africa, and his works in English include a co-edited volume:Preventing Violent Conflicts in Africa: Inequalities, Perceptions and Institutions (Palgrave, 2013). He is Secretary General of the Japan Association of Human Security Studies and Visiting Fellow at JICA (Japan International Cooperation Agency) Research Institute. Grasian Mkodzongi(Chapter 3) is a post-doctoral research fellow at the University of Cape Town. He obtained his Ph.D. from the University of Edinburgh (United Kingdom). His doctoral thesis entitled ‘Fast Tracking Land Reform and Rural Livelihoods in Mashonaland West Province of Zimbabwe’ was about the dynamics of rural livelihoods after Zimbabwe’s FTLR Programme. His current research focuses on the interfaces of agrarian change, mineral resource extraction and rural livelihoods in Zimbabwe and the Southern African region.
Shuichi Oyama4) is Associate Professor at Center for (Chapter African Area Studies, Kyoto University, Japan. His major research fields are geography and anthropology concerning land issues and people’s livelihoods in northern Zambia and in the Niger of the Sahel region. His main works include ‘Land Degradation and Ecological Knowledge-based Land Rehabilitation: Hausa Farmers and Fulbe Herders in the Sahel Region, West Africa’, in T. Reuter ed.Averting a Global Environmental Collapse: The Role of Anthropology and Local Knowledge(Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2015). Yoko Nagahara (Chapter 5) is Professor at the Graduate School of Letters, Kyoto University, Japan. Her major research fields are the history of Southern Africa and comparative colonial history. Her edited works include:Toward New Perspectives of African History: Women, Gender, and Feminisms (Ochanomizu Shobo, 2006, in Japanese) andColonial Responsibilities: A Comparative History of Decolonization (Aoki Shoten, 2009, in Japanese). She is former Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of African StudiesAssociation (Japan for African Studies). Toshihiro Abe(Chapter 6) is Associate Professor at the Faculty of Letters, Otani University, Japan. His research interests principally relate to social reconciliation, transitional justice, migration and social movements in the South African and Cambodian contexts. In the late 1990s he started a career in sociology, researching reconciliation processes in South Africa. Recently, his interest has expanded to the field of transitional justice more generally. Zvakanyorwa Wilbert Sadomba (Chapter 8) is a researcher with Centre for Applied Social Sciences (CASS) at the University of Zimbabwe. He won consecutively (2013 and 2014) the First Prize of the Vice Chancellor’s award for research excellence. He is a sculptor and an inventor with four patents under his belt. He has published several journal articles andWar Veterans in Zimbabwe’s Revolution:Challenging Neo-colonialism and Settler and International Capital(James Currey, 2011) and completed a manuscript,The Stubborn Ghost of Alvord(forthcoming). His research interests are to interrogate the effect of African liberation movements on
postcolonial societies using philosophical and anthropological approaches. Mayu Hayakawa (Chapter 9) is a part-time lecturer at Kumeda Nursing School in Osaka, Japan. She received her Ph.D. from Osaka University in 2013. Her major research interest lies in the anthropological study of popular economy in Africa. She is the author ofAn Anthropology of Hyperinflation: Multiple Monies and the People in Zimbabwe(Jimbun Shoin, 2015, in Japanese). Michael Neocosmos (Chapter 10) is Professor and Director of the Unit for the Humanities at Rhodes University (UHURU). His main fields of research have included political economy, migrant labour, ethnicity, citizenship, state and civil society, political transition, all in Southern Africa, as well as issues of social theory concerning rural development, democracy, human rights and political subjectivities. His main publications include:The Agrarian Question in Southern AfricaAfrikainstitutet, 1993); (Nordiska From Foreign Natives to Native Foreigners: Explaining Xenophobia in South Africa (Codesria, 2006 and 2010); andThinking Freedom in Africa: Toward a Theory of Emancipatory Politics (Wits University Press, forthcoming).
Table of Contents Contributors…………………………...………..…...……. v List of Abbreviations…………………………..…………. xiii Preface……………………………………………………. xvii Chapter 1: Introduction: African Potentials for Conflict Resolution and Transformation…………... 11.1. Introduction………………………………………….. 1 1.2. Violence and Social Disarticulation in Africa…………. 3 1.3. Three Predominant Approaches……………………… 8 1.4. African Potentials: An Alternative Approach?.................. 11 1.5. Structural Violence and Accumulation Trajectories  in Africa……………………………………………… 14 1.6. African Potentials in History………………………….. 18 1.7. The Structure of this Book……………………………23 Part I: Structure and Agency…………………………… 35 Chapter 2: Southern African Potentials to Address Land-based Conflict…………………………... 372.1. Introduction: Conflict Management Perspectives……... 37 2.2. Understanding the Southern African Conflict  Regime………………………………………………. 40 2.3. Compromised Decolonisation and the Narrow  Peace-making Frameworks…………………………… 45 2.4. Zimbabwe’s Radicalisation and its Potentials  for Conflict Management…………………………….. 50 2.5. Structural Reform: Accumulation  from Below and Above?………………………………56 2.6. Managing External Dimensions of the Conflict……… 62 2.7. Concluding Remarks………………………………….. 66 Chapter 3: Utilising ‘African Potentials’ to Resolve Conflicts in a Changing Agrarian Situation in Central Zimbabwe………………………….75 ix