Approaches to Aboriginal Education in Canada
456 Pages
English

Approaches to Aboriginal Education in Canada

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In the crucial discussion of Aboriginal education in Canada, there are two distinct schools of thought: parallelism and integrationism. For the first time in one volume, leading thinkers on both sides share their perspectives, allowing readers to examine this complex and emotionally charged issue from all angles.
Parallelism argues for Aboriginal self-determination and independent schools with Aboriginal values at their core, while integrationism advocates improving Aboriginal educational achievement within the conventional system. Both sides share the same goal, however: supporting and helping to realize the vast store of untapped potential in Aboriginal communities. Everyone agrees that Aboriginal education in Canada urgently needs improvement. A vigorous and informed debate can only speed the search for solutions.

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Published 06 November 2013
Reads 30
EAN13 9781550594577
License: All rights reserved
Language English

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Approaches toAboriginal Education in Canada
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Approaches to Aboriginal Education in Canada
S E A R C H I N G F O R S O L U T I O N S
FrancesWiddowsonandAlbert Howard, editors
Copyright © 2013 Frances Widdowson and Albert Howard
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ExcerptsfromthispublicationmaybereproducedunderlicencefromAccessCopyright,or with the express written permission of Brush Education Inc., or under licence from a collective management organization in your territory. All rights are otherwise reserved and no part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanic, photocopying, digital copying, scanning, recording or otherwise, except as specifically authorized. Brush Education Inc.www.brusheducation.cacontact@brusheducation.caCover design: Carol Dragich, Dragich Design; Illustration of wampum pattern: Julia Jungwirth; Photo of braid pattern: © Zheng Dong | Dreamstime.com Copy edit: Kirsten Craven
Thisbookcollectspreviouslypublishedarticlesintheiroriginalforms.Whereverpossible, we have updated and edited citations for usefulness and consistency. Where updating was not possible, we have included the authors’ original citation information for your reference.
PrintedandmanufacturedinCanadaEbookeditionavailableatAmazon,Kobo,andothere-retailers.
LibraryandArchivesCanadaCataloguinginPublicationApproachestoAboriginaleducationinCanada:searchingforsolutions/FrancesWiddowson and Albert Howard, editors. Includesbibliographicalreferences.Issuedinprintandelectronicformats.ISBN978-1-55059-456-0(pbk.).ISBN978-1-55059-457-7(epub).ISBN978-1-55059-476-8(pdf).–ISBN 978-1-55059-477-5 (mobi)
1. Native peoples–Education–Canada. I. Widdowson, Frances, 1966-, editor of compilation II. Howard, Albert, editor of compilation E96.2.A66 2013 371.829'97071 C2013-902688-6 C2013-902689-4
ProducedwiththeassistanceoftheGovernmentofAlberta,AlbertaMultimediaDevelopment Fund. We also acknowledge the financial support of the Government of Canada through the Canada Book Fund for our publishing activities.
InMemoriamLarryGaynor19392010
Dedication
Contents
AcknowledgementsIntroduction: Hunting Assumptions in the Search for Solutions
PartI:ParallelistApproachesEducation in Canada: A Retrospective1 Aboriginal and a Prospective VernaJ.Kirkness
Aboriginal Curricular Content and2 Silencing Perspectives Through Multiculturalism: “There are Other Children Here” VernaSt.Denis
3 Closing the Education Gap: A Case for Aboriginal Early Childhood Education in Canada, a Look at the Aboriginal Head Start Program MaiNguyen
4 Canadian Native Students and Inequitable Learning WayneGorman
 5 Making Science Assessment Culturally Valid for Aboriginal Students John B. Friesen and Anthony N. Ezeife
New Deal6 A BlairStonechild
7 Connections and Reconnections: Affirming Cultural Identity in Aboriginal Teacher Education Linda Goulet and Yvonne McLeod
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PartII:IntegrationistApproaches8 Schools Matter JohnRichards
9 A New Approach to Understanding Aboriginal Educational Outcomes: The Role of Social Capital Jerry White, Nicholas Spence, and Paul Maxim
10 Why We Need a First Nations Education Act MichaelMendelson
11 Free to Learn: Giving Aboriginal Youth Control over Their Post-Secondary Education CalvinHelinandDaveSnow
12 Retention of Aboriginal Students in Post-Secondary Education JudyHardes
13 Aboriginalism and the Problems of Indigenous Archaeology RobertMcGhee
14 Running the Gauntlet: Challenging the Taboo Obstructing Aboriginal Education Policy Development AlbertHowardwithFrancesWiddowson15 The Unintended Outcomes of Institutionalizing Ethnicity: Lessons from Maori Education in New Zealand ElizabethRata
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C O N T E N T S  V I I
16 Native Studies and Canadian Political Science: The Implications of “Decolonizing the Discipline” FrancesWiddowson
PartIII:Exchanges17 First Nations Education and Rentier Economics: Parallels with the Gulf States JohnR.Minnis18 First Nations Education and Minnis’s Rentier Mentality FrankDeer
19 Ganigonhi:oh: The Good Mind Meets the Academy DavidNewhouse20 The “Good Mind” and Critical Thinking: A Response to David Newhouse FrancesWiddowson21 Paths to Truths DavidNewhouse
Contributors
V I I I  C O N T E N T S
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Acknowledgements
Therearemanypeoplewhoshouldbethankedforassistinguswiththis project. Firstofall,wewouldliketothankanumberofpeopleatMountRoyal University for providing a scholarly environment where open and honest debate is encouraged, not suppressed. These people in-clude Duane Bratt and Bruce Foster, the present and previous chairs of the Department of Policy Studies, Manuel Mertin and Sabrina Reed, the previous dean and previous associate dean of the Faculty of Arts, and Robin Fisher (the previous provost and vice-president, academic). All of these individuals were instrumental in supporting the Aboriginal policy forums where Aboriginal education policy was debated. Miriam Carey also provided guidance that was helpful in developing the Bertrand Russell quadrant in the Exchanges section of the book. Elaine Mullen contributed to the development of our ideas about critical thinking and their application to the introduc-tion. Walter Bruno has been a great source of support in encourag-ing the free exchange of ideas about Aboriginal policy and identity politics in general. Jeffrey Keshen, the new dean of Arts, also should be commended for encouraging a climate of civil debate at Mount Royal University. Therearealsoanumberofpoliticalscientiststobethankedforencouraging open debate on Aboriginal policy. These include Janet Ajzenstat, Kathy Brock, Alan Cairns, Katherine Fierlbeck, Tom Flana-gan, Rhoda Howard-Hassmann, and Leo Panitch. Furthermore,DavidNewhouseandElizabethRataarethankedforcontributing original work to this volume. Both scholars have been very helpful and open in sharing their thoughts concerning Aborigi-nal education. WewouldliketothankthestudentsinWiddowsonssegmentofPolicy Studies 5010 (Selected Topics in Public Policy), upon which this book was modelled. They have been an inquisitive group, whose questions contributed to our investigation of this topic. Tom Wid-dowson’s comments on the manuscript were especially helpful.
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