178 Pages
English

Latin: A Fresh Approach Book 1

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Description

A clear and concise introduction to Latin designed to steadily lead students through a series of illustrative examples, readings, vocabulary lists and translation exercises.


This book is the first of a complete three-volume course, written with the aim of making the basics of the Latin language as easy and accessible as possible to beginners, regardless of their age. Throughout, the author presents the language alongside insights into the culture and civilization of Ancient Rome, using numerous full colour photographs and original drawings to make the introduction to language deliberately gradual and visually stimulating in order to engage students and allow them to relate to the subject matter. There is no continuous story in Latin, but plenty of linguistic exercises which will give students sufficient practice in emphasizing the basic points, allowing them time to gain confidence in understanding one new lesson before moving on to the next. Vocabulary is introduced at regular intervals, and the books include numerous challenging and interesting exercises, designed to be of manageable length so as to be less imposing and easier to learn.


Why Study Latin?; An Outline of Roman History; The Latin Language; Roman Names and Families; Nouns and Verbs: An Introduction; Subject and Object; Singular and Plural; Verb Tables; Possession; Indirect Object; Prepositions; Simple Questions; Addressing People; Noun Tables; Adjectives; The Verb 'Sum'; Vocabulary; Latin-Based Web Sites

Subjects

Informations

Published by
Published 01 December 1999
Reads 1
EAN13 9780857287656
Language English
Document size 17 MB

Legal information: rental price per page 0.0040€. This information is given for information only in accordance with current legislation.

Exrait

LATIN A Fresh Approach Book 1
_________________________
MIKE SEIGEL
Anthem Press An imprint of Wimbledon Publishing Company www.anthempress.com
This edition first published in UK and USA 1999 by ANTHEM PRESS 75-76 Blackfriars Road, London SE1 8HA, UK or PO Box 9779, London SW19 7ZG, UK and 244 Madison Ave. #116, New York, NY 10016, USA
Copyright © Mike Seigel 1999
The moral right of the author has been asserted.
All rights reserved. Without limiting the rights under copyright reserved above, no part of this publication may be reproduced, stored or introduced into a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means (electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise), without the prior written permission of both the copyright owner and the above publisher of this book.
British Library Cataloguing in Publication Data A catalogue record for this book is available from the British Library.
Library of Congress Cataloging in Publication Data A catalog record for this book has been requested.
Illustrated by A. Harrison
1 3 5 7 9 10 8 6 4 2
ISBN–10: 1 89885 525 0 (Pbk) ISBN–13: 978 1 89885 525 5 (Pbk)
Cover design: PM Graphics
Printed in India
MIKE SEIGEL
Mike Seigel has had a distinguished academic and teaching career. An Oxford
University graduate, he won an Exhibition to New College where he read Classics.
After joining St Paul’s School and Colet Court in 1973, Mike was Head of Classics at
Colet Court from 1976 to 1987, during which period more than 80 of his pupils succeeded in getting scholarships to the most prestigious Independent schools in the UK, including Eton, St Paul’s, Winchester and Westminster. He then concentrated his teaching on GCSE and A level classes, as well as working as a Careers and Universities Adviser, before being appointed Headmaster of Rokeby School, Kingston-upon-Thames.
FOR
Wendy, Emma and Alexander
and all my pupils past, present and future
Acknowledgements
The author and publishers are grateful to the following for permission to reproduce copyright material and illustrations:
David Camden, Leo Curran, the BBC, Barnaby’s Picture Gallery, Paula Chabot, Leslie Noles, the European Community, the Ancient Sites website, Ronald Embleton, Mark Hegarty, the U.S. National Archives and Records Administration, Dr Peter Wade-Martin of the Norfolk Museum Service, R.L. Dalladay, Christopher Wood, F. Trefeu and the NCMA.
Every effort has been made to contact all copyright holders before publication. If there are any omissions the publishers will be pleased to rectify them at the earliest opportunity.
We are most grateful to all those people who sent in constructive comments after they had seen the uncorrected book proof, and several of their helpful suggestions have been included in this final version.
Particular thanks are due to the following for their kind and helpful input: John Hazel, John Traupman, William Harris, Paul Tweddle and especially John Smith.
............................................................................................................................... ..................................... v L A T I N – A F r e s h A p p r o a c h B o o k 1
Introduction
This book is the first of three volumes, which will form a complete beginner’s course to bring pupils up to the level which starts my previous bookLatin: From Common Entrance toGCSE.
Those familiar with my previous book will recognise a similar style here.
I have tried to combine clarity of explanation with a somewhat more traditional approach. The aim is very much to make the basics of the Latin language easy and accessible to pupils, whatever their age, as they embark on what I trust will be a satisfying study of the subject.
I hope that the layout and explanation of the grammar will facilitate the learning process. The pace is deliberately slow and steady: my thoughts have been that this book will be used for the whole of a student’s first year of Latin, but for older pupils the pace could easily be accelerated.
There is deliberately no continuous story in Latin, but instead plenty of linguistic exercises which it is hoped will give sufficient practice in emphasising the basic points, while allowing pupils time to gain confidence in understanding one new point before they move on to the next.
My intention is also to teach the language alongside the culture and civilisation which produced it. I have therefore made the introduction to the language very gradual in the first few chapters, and thereafter I provide background material in English at the end of each chapter.
This material is designed to be interesting and relevant for its own sake, but has also been compiled with the Common Entrance syllabus in mind, for those who are preparing for that exam. I have
............................................................................................................................... ..................................... k 1vii L A T I N – A F r e s h A p p r o a c h B o o
Introduction .....................................................................................................................................................................................................................
also provided exercises in this area to provide variety and to inspire the pupils to pursue their own research on these topics.
Vocabulary has been introduced at regular intervals, and I have aimed to make the lists of manageable length so that they will be more easily learnt. I have also tried to use all new words in the various exercises to aid recognition and memory of their meaning. Here too I have had the Common Entrance syllabus in mind, but have widened the vocabulary a little to include words met in the “background” sections.
As with my previous book, I hope that this course will make the learning of Latin both stimulating and enjoyable!
Mike Seigel June 1999
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WHYSTUDYLATIN?
AN OUTLINE OF ROMAN HISTORY
THELATINLANGUAGE
ROMAN NAMESAND FAMILIES
Contents
NOUNS AND VERBS:AN INTRODUCTION
Life in Ancient Rome
SUBJECTAND OBJECT
Roman Houses
SINGULARAND PLURAL
Roman Gods
VERB TABLES
Religion in the Home
POSSESSION
Slaves
INDIRECT OBJECT
Food and Drink
PREPOSITIONS
Roman Britain
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Contents .....................................................................................................................................................................................................................
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SIMPLE QUESTIONS
Boudicca’s Revolt
ADDRESSING PEOPLE
Hadrian’s Wall
NOUN TABLES
Going to School
ADJECTIVES
Romulus and Remus
THE VERB “SUM”
VOCABULARY
Life in the Country
Latin–English English–Latin
LATIN-BASEDWEB SITES
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115
125
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155
155 160
165
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