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English
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Latin: A Fresh Approach Book 2

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167 Pages
English

Description

The second book in a clear and concise introduction to Latin designed to steadily lead students through a series of illustrative examples, readings, vocabulary lists and translation exercises.


The second volume of Mike Seigel's new three-volume course aims to present grammar in the clearest possible way and build upon the lessons of Book 1. The language content is supported by detailed insights into the history and culture of Ancient Rome, with stimulating full colour pictures to help bring the Roman Empire to life.


Revision of Nouns; Third Declension Nouns; More Third Declension Nouns; Neuter Nouns; The Present Tense - All Four Groups; The Infinitive; Personal Pronouns; More Adjectives; Adverbs; The Imperfect Tense; The Future Tense; Verbs Like Capio; Fourth Declension Nouns; Fifth Declension Nouns; Time; Place; The Locative; More on Pronouns; Vocabulary

Subjects

Informations

Published by
Published 01 December 1999
Reads 0
EAN13 9780857287663
Language English
Document size 18 MB

Legal information: rental price per page 0.0040€. This information is given for information only in accordance with current legislation.

Exrait

LATIN
A Fresh Approach Book 2

By
MIKE SEIGEL
Headmaster of Rokeby School,
Kingston-upon-Thames

Anthem Press
An imprint of Wimbledon Publishing Company
www.anthempress.com

This edition first published in UK and USA 1999
by ANTHEM PRESS
75-76 Blackfriars Road, London SE1 8HA, UK
or PO Box 9779, London SW19 7ZG, UK
and
244 Madison Ave. #116, New York, NY 10016, USA

Copyright © Mike Seigel 1999

The moral right of the author has been asserted.

All rights reserved. Without limiting the rights under copyright
reserved above, no part of this publication may be reproduced,
stored or introduced into a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any
form or by any means (electronic, mechanical, photocopying,
recording or otherwise), without the prior written permission of
both the copyright owner and the above publisher of this book.

British Library Cataloguing in Publication Data
A catalogue record for this book is available from the British Library.

Library of Congress Cataloging in Publication Data
A catalog record for this book has been requested.

Illustrated by A. Harrison

1 3 5 7 9 10 8 6 4 2

ISBN 9781 898855 26 2 (Pbk)

Cover design: PM Graphics

MIKE SEIGEL

Mike Seigel has had a distinguised academic and teaching career. An
Oxford University graduate, he won an Exhibition to New College where he
read Classics. After joining St Paul’s School and Colet Court in 1973, Mike
was Head of Classics at Colet Court from 1976 to 1987, during which
period more than 80 of his pupils suceeded in getting scholarships to the
most prestigious Independent schools in the UK, including Eton, St Paul’s
Winchester and Westminster. He then concentrated his teaching on GCSE
and A level classes, as well as working as a Careers and Universities
adviser, before being appointed Headmaster of Rokeby School,
Kingstonupon-Thames in 1999.

FOR

Wendy, Emma and Alexander

and all my pupils
past, present and future

Acknowledgements

The author and publishers are grateful to the following for permission to
reproduce copyright material and illustrations:

David Camden, Leo Curran, Barnaby’s Picture Gallery, Paula Chabot,
Leslie Noles, John Traupman, Barbara McManus

Every effort has been made to contact all copyright holders before
publication. If there are any omissions the publishers will be pleased to
rectify them at the earliest opportunity.

.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................
L A T I N– AF r e s hA p p r o a c hB o o k2v

Introduction

I am delighted to be introducing the second book in the three volume
series which will make a complete beginner’s course in Latin. This book
continues the philosophy and practice of Book 1, with a variety of
exercises to meet the advancing needs of the students, while grammar
and vocabulary are again brought in at a pace designed to suit the pupils.

There continues to be a balance between the language and the culture of
Ancient Rome, with background material aimed at both general interest
as well as the Common Entrance syllabus.

Once again I hope that this book will make Latin a pleasure rather than a
chore, and that it will be enjoyed by pupils and teachers alike!

MKS
June 2000

.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................
L A T I N– AF r e s hA p p r o a c hB o o k2vii

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

REVISION OF NOUNS

Legends of Rome

THIRD DECLENSION NOUNS

Horatius

Contents

MORE THIRD DECLENSION NOUNS

Scaevola

NEUTER NOUNS

Cloelia

THE PRESENT TENSE–ALL FOUR GROUPS

Coriolanus

THE INFINITIVE

The Roman Republic

PERSONAL PRONOUNS

Latin Literature

MORE ADJECTIVES

Plays

ADVERBS

Theatres

THE IMPERFECT TENSE

Amphitheatres

THE FUTURE TENSE

Gladiators
VERBS LIKECAPIO

Beast shows

1

11

21

27

35

43

51

57

67

75

83

93

.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................
L A T I N– AF r e s hA p p r o a c hB o o k2ix

13

14

15

16

FOURTH DECLENSION NOUNS

Chariot-racing

FIFTH DECLENSION NOUNS; TIME

The Baths

PLACE; THE LOCATIVE

Enemies of Rome (1)

MORE PRONOUNS

Enemies of Rome (2)

VOCABULARY

101

109

119

127

137

.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................
x B o o k2L A T I N– AF r e s hA p p r o a c h

REVISION OF
NOUNS

1

In the previous book we met nouns of the first two groups, which
we call Declensions.

Nouns likepuellabelong to what we call theFirst Declension;
nouns likeservus, puerandagerto theSecond Declension.

If you are at all unsure of these, use the tables below to refresh
your memory.

NOM
VOC
ACC
GEN
DAT
ABL

NOM
VOC
ACC
GEN
DAT
ABL

SINGULAR
puella
puella
puellam
puellae
puellae
puellƗ

SINGULAR
servus
serve
servum
servƯ
servǀ
servǀ

PLURAL
puellae
puellae
puellƗs
puellƗrum
puellƯs
puellƯs

PLURAL
servƯ
servƯ
servǀs
servǀrum
servƯs
servƯs

.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................
L A T I N– AF r e s hA p p r o a c hB o o k21

Chapter 1
.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................

N/V
ACC
GEN
DAT
ABL

N/V
ACC
GEN
DAT
ABL

SINGULAR

puer
puerum
puerƯ
puerǀ
puerǀ

SINGULAR

ager
agrum
agrƯ
agrǀ
agrǀs

PLURAL
puerƯ
puerǀs
puerǀrum
puerƯs
puerƯs

PLURAL

agrƯs
agrǀs
agrǀrum
agrƯs
agrƯs

Now is perhaps also a good time to revise the case uses which
you have so far learnt:

NOMINATIVEis used to describe the Subject of a sentence:

puellaeambulant
The girlsare walking

VOCATIVEis used to address people and is sometimes
preceded by the word “o”:

(o) puellae, ubi estis?
Girls, where are you?

ACCUSATIVEis used a) as the Object of the sentence:

puellasvidemus
We seethe girls

b) after certain prepositions:

ad puellasambulamus
We walktowards the girls

GENITIVEis used to denote possession:

puellarumlibros habeo
I havethe girls’books

.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................
2 F r e s hA p p r o a c hL A T I N– AB o o k2

Revision of Nouns
.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................

DATIVEis used a) as the Indirect Object, often after verbs of
giving, showing etc.:

or

puellislibros do
I give the booksto the girls
I givethe girlsthe books

b) to denote advantage (or disadvantage!):

cenampuellisparo
I am preparing dinnerfor the girls

ABLATIVEis used after certain prepositions:

cum puellisambulamus
We are walkingwith the girls

Here are some new nouns to be learnt before you do the
exercises in this chapter:

Likepuella:
luna
mora
porta
terra
turba
umbra
unda

Likeservus:
oculus
socius
somnus

and some new prepositions:
ante + Acc
post + Acc
sine + Abl
sub + Acc/Abl
trans + Acc

moon
delay
gate
land, ground
crowd
shade
wave

eye
ally
sleep

before, in front of
after, behind
without
under
across

.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................
L A T I N– AF r e s hA p p r o a c hB o o k23

Chapter 1
.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................

EXERCISE 1.1

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

pueri in hortum sine mora festinant.
luna viam nautis fessis monstrat.
cur ante portas statis, puellae?
Marcus turbam amicorum videt.
regina sub umbra cum filia sedet.
agricolae trans agros ambulant.
post cenam servi in culina manent.
socii ad muros appropinquant.
num undas times, Gai?
vir pecuniam post casam celat.

EXERCISE 1.2

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

The farmers are hurrying towards the gates.
The little girl is waiting behind the house.
Marcus is walking in the garden without Julia.
The great waves are destroying the shore of the island.
Why are you not sitting under the shade, Marcus?

Note these other uses of the DATIVE and ABLATIVE cases:

DATIVE

a) as the Direct Object after a few verbs such as
pareo(I obey)placeo(I please):

puellisparemus
We obeythe girls

b) to denote possession:

puellisest casa nova
The girlshave a new house
(lit. there is a new house to/for the girls)

ABLATIVEto describe how something is done:

puellaehastispugnant
The girls are fightingwith spears

.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................
4 – AF r e s hL A T I N2A p p r o a c hB o o k

Revision of Nouns
.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................

EXERCISE 1.3

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

nonne magistro paretis, pueri?
casa nova agricolae placet.
dea oculos nautarum somno superat.
socii hastis et sagittis pugnant.
puero est equus magnus.
cur liber novus pueris non placet?
Marcus amicum prope portas videt.
turba puellarum Marcum in horto exspectat.
nonne luna nautis terram monstrat?
servo misero non sunt duo oculi.

EXERCISE 1.4

Before translating the following sentences, copy out each one,
underline each noun and say what case it is.

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

servi cenam pueris parant.
magister pueros ira terret.
turba puerorum post murum manet.
cur ante casam amici sedes, Marce?
puella e casa in hortum sine mora festinat.
in horto cum amicis sedemus.
poeta pecuniam puellis saepe dat.
num pueri hastis in agris pugnant?
dea ex undis in oram ambulat.
luna viam pueris monstrat.

When translating into Latin you need to take great care over the
word“with”

e.g.

I attack the housewith arrows

tells you how I attack it and so“with arrows”requires the
plain Ablative

BUT

means

casamsagittisoppugno

I attack the housewith my friends

“together with”and so requires“cum”

casamcum amicisoppugno

.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................
L A T I N– AF r e s hA p p r o a c hB o o k25

Chapter 1
.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................

EXERCISE 1.5

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

We are walking towards the gate with our* friends.
The schoolmaster frightens the small boy with his* anger.
Surely the girls are not fighting with spears?
The slaves always obey the farmer.
Marcus has a new book.

* Remember that these words do not need to be translated.

EXERCISE 1.6

Write two or three Latin sentences to describe what is
happening in the picture below.

EXERCISE 1.7

1.

2.

Explain the meaning of the following English words,
and show how they derive from Latin:

association

somnolent

subterranean

umbrella.

Find English derivatives from the following Latin words,
and write a sentence for each which clearly shows
its meaning:

ager

hortus

luna

oculus.

.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................
6 – AL A T I NA p p r o a c hF r e s hB o o k2