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English

My Notebook of Questions : The Human Body

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The human body is a truly amazing “machine.” Since time began, human beings have tried to grasp how it works, what it does, why it hurts, and other mysteries.

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Published 09 August 2012
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EAN13 9782764409091
Language English
Document size 11 MB

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My Notebook of Questions he Bod Professor Genius
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Why do people grow? What is our skin made of? How many bones do we have? Why do we get the hiccups? How do our eyes work?
QA INTERNATIONAL
My Notebook of Questions The Human Body
by Professor Genius
Library and Archives Canada Cataloguing in Publication
Professor Genius  The Human Body  (My Notebook of Questions)  Includes an index  For readers ages 7 and up  ISBN 9782764409091
 1. Human body — Reference books for children. 2. Human physiology — Reference books for children. 3. Human anatomy — Reference books for children. I. Title. II. Collection.
The Human Body, My Notebook of Questions , was designed and produced by:
No part of this book may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying and recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without written permission from the publisher. © 2007 QA International Inc. All rights reserved. www.qainternational.com
Printed and bound in Singapore.
10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 12 11 10 09 08 07
QA Kids a division of QA International inc. 329 de la Commune St. West 3rd Floor Montreal, Quebec H2Y 2E1 Canada
T514.499.3000 F514.499.3010 www.qainternational.com
The characters in Professor Genius’s universe are pure fantasy. Any resemblance to actual living persons is entirely coincidental. Although the facts they contain are accurate, the newspaper articles, old letters, books, and magazines drawn from the professor’s personal collection are all products of the imaginations of the creators of this notebook.
 Contents What is our skin made of? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 What are our bones for? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 How many bones do we have and what are they made of? 12 What is our tongue for?17. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . How does the body move? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 What does the heart look like?24. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . What is saliva for? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 How do blind people read?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 How do eyes work? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Why do we have two ears? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Why do baby teeth fall out? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 What are eyebrows and eyelashes for? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Why do our feet smell? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Why do we have different kinds of teeth?. . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Why do we have to eat to grow taller? . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Why is blood red? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 What are nails for?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55. . . Why does skin come in different colors? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Why do my grandparents have white hair?. . . . . . . . . . . 62 Why do we get the hiccups sometimes? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 Why does the pupil change size? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 Why do we look like our parents?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 Why do we break wind?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 What are fingerprints? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 How does hair grow? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 What is urine?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 Why do we have a belly button?85. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Why is old people’s skin wrinkled? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 How come some people have no hair?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 Why do we close our eyes to sleep? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
To all those who open this notebook, Every day, your heart beats, your lungs breathe, your stomach digests—and you’re not even aware of it! The human body is an incredibly efficient machine. Everything about it fascinates me, and I know there are plenty of curious young people who are just as captivated by the subject as I am. I’ve received so many questions. Why do we have two ears? Why do we have a belly button? What is the tongue for? What are fingerprints? These are just a few of the ones children have sent me. I’ve answered them in this notebook, using simple diagrams, photographs, and illustrations. I hope you’ll find the answers to questions that you’ve asked yourself, too! Happy reading, my friend! Professor Genius
Dear Mr. Genius, I would like to know what my skin is made of. Can you tell me? Thanks! Audrey, age 8
My dear Audrey, Before I answer your question, let me explain what the body is made of. I want to tell you one of my summer holiday memories… It was in 2002, and my sister and I were walking among statues of sand that had been carved by some ingenious builders. We were on the beach in Hardelot, in the north of France. The billions of grains of sand in these statues reminded me of the body.. Why? Because we are also made up of billions of tiny structures, called “cells.”
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Here is one of the beautiful sand sculptures we saw on the beach at Hardelot.
Unlike grains of sand, however, our cells are very much alive. After they are born, they grow, feed themselves, reproduce, and die. Cells are what make our body work so well. There are many different kinds of cells. In fact, each part of the body is made up of its own group of similar cells. The heart is a
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set of cells, as are the lungs, the muscles, the brain, and, yes, the skin. This giant “envelope” around the body is one of our most precious organs. Of course, we can’t live without our heart, brain, or lungs, either, but the skin is our first contact with the outside world. It tells us what is going on around us. Caresses, wounds, pleasant or extreme temperatures—the skin detects them all! It’s also a real barrier, protecting the body from germs, blows, and the Sun’s harmful rays. Now let me get back to your question! Have a look at the diagram I’ve drawn on the next two pages. It shows the three layers that make up the skin, as well as the different structures in it.
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Several NERVE RECEPTORS detect signals coming from the outside, such as pain, temperature changes, and pressure.
The PORE releases perspiration on the skin’s surface.
The EPIDERMIS is the part of the skin you can touch. It forms a barrier to protect the body from outside attack.
The DERMIS is made up of many different structures that tell the body what’s going on around it.
The HYPODERMIS is mainly composed of fat cells. These cells absorb impacts and maintain the body’s heat.
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The SWEAT GLAND manufactures perspiration.