Nomads
172 Pages
English
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Nomads

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172 Pages
English

Description

In Nomads, Emmanuel Fru Doh combines historical fact, legend, and rumour to emerge with a memoir charged with nostalgia. In the process, he merges scenes and events from several lives and the process of nation building as they all unfold and mature with the passing of time. It becomes obvious that these are somber moments in Doh�s life and that of the Cameroon nation, a nation that in recent decades selfish and reckless leaders without goodwill, foresight, or true love for the fatherland have succeeded in destroying. It all boils down to one fact: indeed, there has always been a socio-political agenda by the Francophone-dominated regimes, but it had nothing to do with building a truly united Cameroon. The plan has always been to tactfully subdue and eventually neutralize the Anglophone dimension of the union.

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Informations

Published by
Published 24 June 2013
Reads 0
EAN13 9789956790463
Language English
Document size 1 MB

Legal information: rental price per page 0.0045€. This information is given for information only in accordance with current legislation.

Exrait

Emmanuel Fru Doh NOMADS THEMEMOIROFASOUTHERNCAMEROONIAN
NOMADS The Memoir of a Southern Cameroonian Emmanuel Fru Doh
L a ng a a R esea rch & P u blishing CIG Mankon, Bamenda
Publisher: LangaaRPCIG Langaa Research & Publishing Common Initiative Group P.O. Box 902 Mankon Bamenda North West Region Cameroon Langaagrp@gmail.comwww.langaa-rpcig.net Distributed in and outside N. America by African Books Collective orders@africanbookscollective.com www.africanbookcollective.com ISBN: 9956-790-89-3 ©Emmanuel Fru Doh 2013
DISCLAIMER All views expressed in this publication are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of Langaa RPCIG.
Dedication
To the memory of Professor Linus Tongwo Asong, an invaluable friend and colleague who contradicted virtually every Cameroonian stereotype; the true example of a Southern Cameroonian, who was at home in Buea or in Bamenda and served and entertained caring less about these roots. He refused to succumb to these artificial boundaries today imposed on his people by unpatriotic kleptocrats masquerading as leaders of the hour. and To all peace-loving Cameroonians, especially to this side of the Mungo, that you may always remember.
To God Almighty be Praise and Glory
Note I changed my uncle’s name in order to maintain his privacy and integrity. This venture is not about him, yet that is what it will become, I suspect, should I disclose his identity. It is also worthwhile noting that from “Southern Cameroons,” we have the terminology “Southern Cameroonians,” which is used interchangeably with “West Cameroonians” and “Anglophone-Cameroonians” depending on the situation and time in history. This also applies to “La République du Cameroun” with “East Cameroonians” and “Francophones.”
1 n life, it is mainly events that get people thinking and coIming from in order to understand the present and so try to questioning about virtually everything, especially their identity, and so they look back to see where they are fathom what the future holds for them. In the land of my birth, those of us once referred to as Southern Cameroonians, and later West Cameroonians, have had just too many things visited upon us as a result of our reunification with La République du Cameroun for us to forget that easily. A few examples are the closing of the Bota oil mill, which produced and exported palm kernel oil; the engineered fall of Powercam and the deliberate transformation of the Yoke dam into ruins—Powercam was the corporation that used Yoke dam to supply West Cameroon with affordable electricity; the shutting down of Victoria wharf which led to the demise of Victoria’s economic might, given that it was through this wharf that West Cameroonians imported and exported without having to pay taxes to a different province, region, or nation; the programmed collapse of Cameroon Bank, which made available inexpensive loans without the reigning bribery and corruption in existing banks; the unfortunate but deliberate transformation of our police force into an disorderly bunch even as the unique West Cameroon Police Mobile Wing Force was being disbanded; the arrival of gendarmes and “uniform brutality,” divide and rule, and the nation’s only state of emergency so far, an expression which belies what we experienced during those months.
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