Son of a Red Devil
164 Pages
English
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Son of a Red Devil

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164 Pages
English

Description

This is the story of Lukemba Gelindo. He was adopted by a former football player, August Hellemans � also called Gustaf � of the national Belgian team � The Red Devils. Gelindo and his brother were adopted after they were abandoned in a nursery home where they had been mistreated. He grew up in a Flemish village where people had never seen a black person. In general, Flemings are still surprised when they hear blacks speaking their language fluently. This can lead to perplexing and frustrating encounters with ignorance and arrogance, such as during a job interview where Gelindo had to justify himself over and over again as to where he learned to speak the Flemish language. This is also the story of the differences in mentality between the Flemings and Walloons viewed from a black perspective through the eyes of someone who is intimately familiar with both cultures. Gelindo�s parents were Flemings but he always went to French speaking schools. It is as well, a story about racism, especially racism that stems from Flemings � which is quite implacable, to say the least. Evidence of this statement is not far-fetched; black people are completely absent in the Flemish media, except perhaps as footballers or musicians, meant to entertain but not to claim rights, entitlements or any serious measure of social visibility. More personally, this story is about Gelindo�s experience undergoing psychiatric treatment and also about the sexual tensions between his mother and him. Among other things, it is also Gelindo�s aim to speak out against the manner in which young black children get objectified by the rich and famous as the latest �must have� things, designer accessories up for adoption and adaptation. Like in the rest of the world, this trend is also seen in Flemish magazines in which parents pose in photos with their little black trophy children. The account is direct, honest, uncompromising, laced with cynicism, and in many ways therapeutic.

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Informations

Published by
Published 27 December 2012
Reads 0
EAN13 9789956728343
Language English
Document size 2 MB

Legal information: rental price per page 0.0038€. This information is given for information only in accordance with current legislation.

Exrait

they hear blacks speaking their language Luently. This can lead to
This is also the story of the diFerences in mentality between the
out against the manner in which young black children get objectiIed
pose in photos with their lile black trophy children. The account is
Luently and lives in Brussels.
Son of a
Red Devil
LUKemba GeliNdO
Son of aRed Devil
LUKemba GeliNdO
Son of a Red DevilLukemba Gelindo
L a ng a a R esea rch & P u blishing CIG Mankon, Bamenda
Publisher: LangaaRPCIG Langaa Research & Publishing Common Initiative Group P.O. Box 902 Mankon Bamenda North West Region Cameroon Langaagrp@gmail.comwww.langaa-rpcig.net Distributed in and outside N. America by African Books Collective orders@africanbookscollective.com www.africanbookcollective.com
ISBN: 9956-728-16-0 ©Lukemba Gelindo 2013
DISCLAIMER All views expressed in this publication are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of Langaa RPCIG.
Introduction This memoir is about me. I was adopted by a former football player and captain, August Hellemans - also called Gustaf - of the national Belgian team, The Red Devils. My brother and I were adopted after we were abandoned in a nursery home where we were mistreated. I grew up in a Flemish village where people had never before seen a black person. In general, Flemings are still surprised when they hear blacks speaking their language fluently. This can lead to boring situations during, for example, a job interview where I had to explain over and over again as to how I learned it. Further, my memoir is about the differences in mentality between the Flemings and Walloons viewed from a black perspective and through the eyes of someone who is intimately familiar with both cultures. My parents were Flemings but I always went to French-speaking schools. Among other things, it is also my aim to denounce how young black children get objectified by the rich and famous as the latest ‘must have’ things, designer accessories up for adoption. Like in the rest of the world, this trend is taken by people from all walk of lives. The whole thing is written in a self-loathing way and I always try to be as politically correct as possible (my arse). Lukemba Gelindo Rue de l’Orphelinat 30A bt 78 1070 Bruxelles (Belgium) Tel: 0032. 486.557.109 lukembagelindo@gmail.com
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