Archives, Objects, Places and Landscapes
500 Pages
English
Gain access to the library to view online
Learn more

Archives, Objects, Places and Landscapes

-

Gain access to the library to view online
Learn more
500 Pages
English

Description

Dissatisfaction has matured in Africa and elsewhere around the fact that often, the dominant frameworks for interpreting the continent’s past are not rooted on the continent’s value system and philosophy. This creates knowledge that does not make sense especially to local communities. The big question therefore is can Africans develop theories that can contribute towards the interpretation of the African past, using their own experiences? Framed within a concept revision substrate, the collection of papers in this thought provoking volume argues for concept revision as a step towards decolonizing knowledge in the post-colony. The various papers powerfully expose that ‘cleansed’ knowledge is not only locally relevant: it is also locally accessible and globally understandable.

Subjects

Informations

Published by
Published 11 April 2017
Reads 0
EAN13 9789956762453
Language English
Document size 25 MB

Legal information: rental price per page 0.0085€. This information is given for information only in accordance with current legislation.

Exrait

E
Archives, Objects, Places and Landscapes Multidisciplinary approaches to Decolonised Zimbabwean pasts
EDITEDBYMunyaradzi Manyanga and Shadreck Chirikure
Archives, Objects, Places and Landscapes: Multidisciplinary approaches to Decolonised Zimbabwean pasts Edited by Munyaradzi Manyanga & Shadreck Chirikure L a ng a a R esea rch & P u blishing CIG Mankon, Bamenda
Publisher:LangaaRPCIG Langaa Research & Publishing Common Initiative Group P.O. Box 902 Mankon Bamenda North West Region Cameroon Langaagrp@gmail.comwww.langaa-rpcig.net Distributed in and outside N. America by African Books Collective orders@africanbookscollective.com www.africanbookscollective.com ISBN-10: 9956-764-19-1 ISBN-13: 978-9956-764-19-8 ©Munyaradzi Manyanga & Shadreck Chirikure 2017
All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, mechanical or electronic, including photocopying and recording, or be stored in any information storage or retrieval system, without written permission from the publisher
Notes on contributors
Forget Chaterera is a lecturer in information science at the National University of Science and Technology. Previously, she worked as an assistant lecturer at Midlands State University. She holds a BA Honours in archaeology, an MA in museum studies, a MInfSc in archival science, and a Postgraduate Diploma in tertiary education. Her research interests include documentation of cultural heritage, museum management and archival science. She is currently a PhD candidate in information science (archival science) with the University of South Africa. Joseph Chikumbirikeholds a PhD in archaeological science from the University of the Witwatersrand. He is currently a lecturer in materials sciences at Sol Plaatje University.research interests His include archaeobotany, paleoclimates and heritage education. Herbert Chimhundua sociolinguist by training. He is a is university professor currently with the Chinhoyi University of Technology. He has held posts at various institutions of higher learning across Zimbabwe. He also sits/has sat on several boards of arts and learning institutes. In addition to receiving multiple awards and distinctions, he has published a number of literary works on the Shona language. Shadreck Chirikureis an associate professor in the Department of Archaeology, University of Cape Town. He has an MA in artefact studies and a PhD in archaeology from the Institute of Archaeology, University College London. Since his training crossed many disciplinary spaces, interdisciplinarity comes naturally to his research, which follows three separate but interrelated strands: the first combines techniques from earth and engineering sciences with those from archaeology, anthropology and history to study precolonial technologies such as mining, metallurgy, pottery making and other high temperature processes; the second focuses on heritage management and conservation, emphasising the role of local communities in heritage interpretation and conservation; and
the third collapses the first two, exploring the development of African-centred knowledge that responds to the needs of the post-colony. Simbarashe Shadreck Chitimais a graduate of Chinhoyi University Technology where he studied graphic design before joining Midlands University. Here, he studied for a MA in museum studies. His research interest is in museum visitorship, access and museum education. He is a lecturer with Midlands State University and is a PhD candidate with the same institution. Davison Chiwaraarchaeology and museum studies at the studied Midlands State University. He is currently pursuing a PhD at Midlands State University. His doctoral research is on preventive conservation of cultural property in the museum environment. He is currently a lecturer in museum studies at the Midlands State University. Precious Chiwarais a teaching assistant at the University of Zimbabwe. She is currently researching the archaeology of hunter-gatherers in southern Africa.Collet Dandarais a professor of human genetics in the Division of Human Genetics, Faculty of Health Science at UCT. He has over 10 years' experience in human genetics, with a primary interest in pharmacogenetics/pharmacogenomics. He is also interested in evaluating human genetic variation that is associated with differential risk for oesophageal and cervical cancer. He has a passion for understanding the Shona past through deploying molecular techniques. Nyasha Agnes Gurirais currently a lecturer in heritage studies at the Midlands State University. She holds an Honours degree in archaeology, cultural heritage and museum studies, and an MA in heritage studies. She is currently researching on heritage and sustainable development and the application of heritage management protocols in the conservation of the built heritage.
Clapperton Gutuis a curator of archaeology with the National Museums and Monuments of Zimbabwe. He is a specialist heritage conservator with a special interest in dry-stone wall conservation. He holds a MA in heritage studies from the University of Zimbabwe. Petronellah Katekwegraduated witha BA Honours in archaeology and Postgraduate Diploma in tertiary education from the Midlands State University. She also holds an MA in heritage studies from the University of Zimbabwe. She is the current chairperson of the Department of Archaeology, Cultural Heritage and Museum Studies at the Midlands State University. She is one of the pioneer researchers on liberation heritage is southern Africa. Seke Katsamudangais a senior lecturer in archaeology at the University of Zimbabwe. His research interests include settlement archaeology, GIS and computer applications in archaeology, past climate and environmental reconstruction and heritage management. He is co-editor of theAncestral landscapes of Manyikaland2015) special issues of the (2007, Zimbabwea journal, andZimbabwean Archaeology in the Post-Independence Era(2013).Marlvern Mabgwea lecturer in archaeology at the Midlands is State University. He holds an MA in archaeology and BA archaeology Honours from Midlands State University. His research interest is in historical archaeology with a particular focus on the food storage and security in pre-colonial times. Munyaradzi Manyanga is a senior lecturer in archaeology and heritage management at the University of Zimbabwe. He holds a licentiate and PhD from Uppsala University, Sweden. He has spent the past two decades researching on the origins and development of the Zimbabwe culture in southern Africa. His works have questioned the adoption of received wisdom in the interpretation of pre-colonial African environments and achievements.
Marcos Martinón-Torresis a professor of archaeological science at the UCL Institute of Archaeology. He coordinates an MSc programme in the technology and analysis of archaeological materials. He is generally interested in the archaeology of technology and science, with a large proportion of his research focusing on metallurgy and alchemy. Happinos Marufuis a postdoctoral fellow in the School of Geography, Archaeology and Environmental Studies (University of the Witwatersrand) and senior curator at National Museums and Monuments of Zimbabwe. He obtained his PhD in archaeology from the University of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania in 2014. His research interests are in the Stone Age, and the transition from hunting and gathering to farming in southern Africa. Ezekia Mtetwais a PhD candidate and assistant lecturer in the Department of Archaeology and Ancient History at Uppsala University Sweden. Previously he worked as an Archaeologist at the Great Zimbabwe National Monument. He graduated with an MA degree in archaeology from the University of Dar es Salam and a Special Honours degree in archaeology from the University of Zimbabwe. His research interest is on precolonial metallurgy. Joseph Mujereis an historian with the University of Zimbabwe. He is also a research fellow with the University of the Witwatersrand. He researches the minority ethnic communities of southern Africa, especially the Basotho in Zimbabwe. He also has a keen interest in understanding the practice of ‘rainmaking’ in Africa. Paul Mupirais an archaeologist-cum-museologist and regional director of the National Museums of Antiques and Transport (eastern region). He holds a Masters degree from Cambridge University and a doctorate from the University of Zimbabwe. He has extensive knowledge on the Nyanga Complex in eastern Zimbabwe. He is currently researching museums and communities, and liberation heritage.
Simbarashe Comfort Muringanizais an archaeologist with the Midlands State University. He holds a Masters degree in archaeology from the Midlands State University. Comfort is passionate about rock art and his current research focuses on the interpretation of the giraffe depictions in the rock art of southern Africa. Tendai Musindois a PhD candidate at the University of Pretoria. She holds an MSc in archaeology from University College of London, UK. She is currently a lecturer in archaeology at the Great Zimbabwe University. Her research interests include GIS applications in archaeology, landscape analysis, the role of water in socio-political complexity and historical archaeology. Ancila Nhamois a senior lecturer in archaeology at the University of Zimbabwe. She has a DPhil in archaeology from the University of Zimbabwe. Her research interests include rock art and gender studies in archaeology. Her popular publications include Immortalizing the Past: Reproductions of Zimbabwean Rock Art by Lionel Cripps (2007), and Out of the labyrinth: the significance of kudu images in the rock art of Zimunya (2007).Robert Tendai Nyamushoshois an MPhil candidate in archaeology at the University of Cape Town, South Africa. He is a graduate of the Midlands State University where he majored in archaeology, cultural heritage and museum studies. His interests include ceramic ethnoarchaeology, Iron Age archaeology and heritage interpretation and presentation. Charity Ndlovu-Nyathiis a curator of archaeology with the National Museums and Monuments of Zimbabwe. She has an MA in heritage studies from the Midlands State University, Zimbabwe. Her research interests include archaeological heritage conservation and rock art. Hamutyinei Pamburaiis a lecturer in the Department of Finance and Tax at the University of Cape Town. He is interested in the application of statistical techniques to solve challenges across disciplines.
George Pangetiformer chairperson for the Zimbabwe Parks is and Wildlife Management Authority, and former Africa representative for Safari Club International. He trained as a biologist and is one of the most decorated international experts on wildlife management, hunting and community beneficiation. Currently, he is a director of the Heritage School. Gilbert Pwitiis an associate professor of archaeology at the University of Zimbabwe. Since the early 1980s Gilbert Pwiti has championed multidisciplinary approaches to the understanding of past societies. He has written extensively on the archaeology of Farming Communities and heritage management in Africa. Recently, he has been awarded honorary membership of the Association of Southern African Professional Archaeologists (ASAPA). Thilo Rehrena professor of archaeological materials and is technology at the UCL Institute of Archaeology. His interest lies in reconstructing and understanding of the processes used in the production of metals, glass and glazes, world-wide. He approaches the interpretation of these materials and technological processes through data obtained by microscopic (optical and electron microscopy) and chemical analyses (by electron microprobe, X-ray fluorescence and other methods) of 'technical' finds, such as raw materials, intermediate and semi-finished artefacts, and waste products, where possible in conjunction with archaeological and historical textual sources. Current projects include work on glass and metal production in the Egyptian Late Bronze Age, the Iron Age to classical antiquity in south-east Europe and the Mediterranean, and the Mediaeval Period in Europe and Central Asia. Plan Shenjere-Nyabeziis a senior lecturer in archaeology at the University of Zimbabwe, which position she holds concurrently with a VolkswagenStiftung postdoctoralfellowship. She obtained her PhD in archaeology from the University of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. She is currently researching the ethnoarchaeology of animal resource use in southern Africa.
Ashton Sinamaiis currently Marie Curie Fellow at the University of York in the UK. Hespecialised in the archaeology of Early and Late Farming Communities in southern Africa. He has expanded his interests to critical heritage studies, focusing on tangible/intangible heritage, traditional knowledge systems of Africa and Australia, indigenous archaeologies, identity and representation, as well as memory and world heritage studies. He has a PhD in cultural heritage and museum studies from Deakin University, Australia.Toleni Tayiis a lecturer in heritage studies with the Midlands State University. He holdsaBSocSc in archaeology, and environmental and geographical science; an MA in development studies; an MA in heritage studies and a Postgraduate Diploma in tertiary education. His research interests are in community engagement in heritage management, heritage and legislation, heritage interpretation and education, heritage management and sustainable development. Thomas Panganayi Thondhlanais a lecturer in archaeology and heritage management at Great Zimbabwe University. He obtained his PhD at University College, London in 2012. His research interests are in archaeometallurgy with a particular emphasis on precolonial copper working.