244 Pages
English

Collaborative Governance in Extractive Industries in Africa

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The potential for using revenues from extractive resources for inclusive growth in Africa is tremendous. However, the realisation of the transformative role that extractive industries could play in sustainable development has been elusive in most African countries. Extractive industries in most of these countries are plagued with numerous conflicts, some with serious casualties over the control, distribution, management and utilisation of the resources and revenues from extractive operations. Collaborative Governance in Extractive Industries in Africa presents the critical challenges facing extractive industries from different contexts, countries, sectors and settings. It features chapters with diverse angle of interest and analytical tools applied in examining the critical issues related particularly to mining and petroleum development in Africa. The contributors to this book have extensive academic and professional experience in policy research in the mining, oil and gas sectors in Africa and other regions. The book addresses the current gap in knowledge about appropriate governance regimes that could create the forum where the divergent interests and positions of various stakeholders of extractive resources and revenues could be handled - without any of them resorting to deadly conflicts. It presents the functionality of collaborative governance in enhancing for example, transparency, accountability, and equitable distribution of extractive revenues. Governance practitioners, policy- and decision makers could use the structures, components and procedures discussed in this book to develop training manuals, governance criteria and indicators for measuring and managing collaborative governance regime at the national and local levels. They will also find useful information about some of the critical elements that should guide the strategic implementation of the collaborative process.

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Published 29 December 2014
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EAN13 9789988633141
Language English
Document size 4 MB

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Collaborative Governance in Extractive Industries in Africa
The United Nations University Institute for Natural Resources in Africa (UNU-INRA), the only Institute of the United Nations University system based in Africa, was established in 1986. The Institute’s mission is to empower African universities and other research institutions through capacity strengthening. UNU-INRA operates mainly from its headquarters in Accra, and Operating Units (OUs) - currently based at universities in Cameroon, Cote d’Ivoire, Namibia, Senegal and Zambia. Institute for Natural Resources in Africa (UNU-INRA) Second floor, International House, Annie Jiagge Road, University of Ghana, Legon Campus Accra, Ghana Private Mail Bag, Kotoka International Airport, Accra, Ghana Email:inra@unu.edu or unuinra@gmail.comwww.inra.unu.edu
Collaborative Governance in Extractive Industries in Africa Edited by: Timothy Afful-Koomson  Kwabena Owusu Asubonteng
Collaborative Governance in Extractive Industries in Africa
Edited by: Timothy Afful-Koomson and Kwabena Owusu Asubonteng ©United Nations University Institute for Natural Resources in Africa (UNU-INRA), 2013ISBN 978 – 9988 – 633 – 13 – 4 Cover designand layout:Kwabena O. Asubonteng Cover photo credits:Yasuko Kusakari, David Mwinfang, Tullow  Oil and UNU-INRAPrinted byPixedit Limited, Ghana - 0203339269 | 0206893271 Disclaimer:The views and opinions expressed in this publication are those of the author’s and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the United Nations University-Institute for Natural Resources in Africa.
Table of Contents
LIST OF FIGURES ............................................................................XI
LIST OF TABLES............................................................................. XII
FOREWORD................................................................................... XIII
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS ......................................................... XVI
LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS ...................................................... XVII
COLLABORATIVE GOVERNANCE AND ITS RELEVANCE FOR EXTRACTIVE INDUSTRIES IN AFRICA ......................... 1
IntroducƟon................................................................................. 1
What is governance?................................................................... 5
TheoreƟ7cal building blocks of governance .................................
What is collaboraƟve governance? ........................................... 13
What are the key features of collaboraƟve governance? ........ 14
What is the value of collaboraƟve governance for extracƟve industries in Africa?................................................................... 18
Chapters in this book................................................................. 19
References................................................................................. 23
IMPROVING THE MANAGEMENT OF MINERAL RESOURCES FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT IN AFRICA................................................................................................. 27
IntroducƟon............................................................................... 27
v
Africa’s non-renewable natural resources and their contribuƟon to the sustainable development on the conƟnent ................... 28
Mineral resources in Africa ....................................................... 29
The contribuƟon of mining to sustainable development in Africa ................................................................................................... 30
EvaluaƟon of the social pillars of sustainable development .... 41
EvaluaƟon of environmental pillars of sustainable development ................................................................................................... 45
Environmental governance ....................................................... 53
Conclusion and recommendaƟons ........................................... 56
References................................................................................. 59
SOCIAL POLICY AND STATE REVENUES IN MINERAL-RICH COUNTRIES IN AFRICA.................................................... 61
IntroducƟon............................................................................... 61
The natural resource ‘curse’ argument..................................... 62
Success stories of some mineral-rich countries ........................ 64
Some policyŽƉƟ65ons for mineral-rich countries in Africa .........
Improving local parƟcipaƟon in mineral resources development ................................................................................................... 68
Mainstreaming mining in PRSPs................................................ 70
Fostering minerals cluster development .................................. 71
Conclusion ................................................................................. 73
References................................................................................. 75
vi
ANALYSIS OF GOVERNANCE IN THE GHANAIAN MINING SECTOR............................................................................. 77
IntroducƟon............................................................................... 77
Mining in Ghana ........................................................................ 78
Conceptualising governance ..................................................... 80
Statement of the problem......................................................... 82
Research design and methodology ........................................... 84
Results and analysis................................................................... 84
Conclusion and recommendaƟons ........................................... 96
References................................................................................. 99
LABOUR ‘SPECIALISATION’ AND SUSTENANCE OF ARTISANAL MINING ACTIVITY IN GHANA ..................... 102
IntroducƟon............................................................................. 102
Factors contribuƟ109ng to growth of specialised labour in ASM.
Labour and skills ...................................................................... 115
Entrepreneurship and ‘growth’ in local mining communiƟes 117
Impact on mineral resources governance, environment, human traĸcking, health and safety .................................................. 118
Conclusion ............................................................................... 120
References............................................................................... 120
WHITHER SUSTAINABLE SMALL AND MEDIUM SCALE MINING IN GUYANA?................................................................. 123
vii
DemysƟ............... 123fying sustainability and sustainable mining
Guyana: a brief overview ........................................................ 125
Environmental sustainability................................................... 130
Social sustainability ................................................................. 134
Governance systems for mining in Guyana ............................ 136
LegislaƟve framework ............................................................. 138
Sustainability challenges ......................................................... 144
Lessons from the Guyanese experience ................................. 148
The way forward ..................................................................... 150
References............................................................................... 152
THE CHALLENGES OF PETROLEUM REVENUES: GHANA, CORRUPTION, AND INSTITUTIONS.................. 155
The resource curse predicament ............................................ 155
PoliƟcal explanaƟons and consequences................................ 158
InsƟtuƟons of extracƟon and redistribuƟon........................... 160
CorrupƟon in the petroleum industry..................................... 162
Ghana and its ‘good governance’............................................ 171
Conclusion ............................................................................... 174
Reference ................................................................................ 177
THE MANAGEMENT OF STRATEGIC RESOURCES: THE OIL AND GAS FIND IN GHANA ............................................. 181
viii
IntroducƟon............................................................................. 181
Contextualising the impact of the oil and gas industry on the environment and society ........................................................ 184
Management frameworks for minimising environmental damage from the oil industry.................................................. 185
CompeƟƟon for resources in Africa ........................................ 187
The ‘resource curse’ ................................................................ 189
The oil and gasĮ191nd in Ghana ..................................................
Conclusion ............................................................................... 197
References............................................................................... 197
ENHANCING COLLABORATIVE GOVERNANCE OF EXTRACTIVE INDUSTRIES IN AFRICA: THE WAY FORWARD ........................................................................................ 200
Summary of key issues ............................................................ 200
Win-win beneĮts and incenƟves for collaboraƟve governance regime...................................................................................... 202
StarƟng and managing the collaboraƟve governance process ................................................................................................. 204
The need for sponsor(s) and leader(s) for the process ........... 204
The insƟtuƟonal set-up for collaboraƟve governance............ 206
Seƫ213ng the rules of engagement.............................................
PrioriƟsing issues and arƟculaƟ213ng interests. ..........................
Making decisions and developing shared understanding....... 215
ix