256 Pages
English
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Non-Europhone Intellectuals

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Gain access to the library to view online
Learn more
256 Pages
English

Description

The history of Arabic writing spans a period of eight hundred years in sub-Saharan Africa. Hundreds of thousands of manuscripts in Arabic or Ajami (African languages written with the Arabic script) are preserved in public libraries and private collections in sub-Saharan Africa. This 'Islamic Library' includes historical, devotional, pedagogical, polemical and political writings, most of which have not yet been adequately studied. This book, Non-Europhone Intellectuals, studies the research carried out on the Islamic library and shows that Muslim intellectuals, in West Africa in particular, have produced huge literature in Arabic and Ajami. It is impossible to reconstitute this library completely. As the texts have existed for centuries and are mostly in the form of unpublished manuscripts, only some of them have been transmitted to us while others have perished because of poor conservation. Efforts toward collecting them continues and the documents collected thus far attest to an intense intellectual life and important debates on society that have been completely ignored by the overwhelming majority of Europhone intellectuals. During European colonial rule and after the independence of African nations, Islamic education experienced some neglect, but the Islamic scholarly tradition did not decline. On the contrary, it has prospered with the proliferation of modern Islamic schools and the rise of dozens of Islamic institutions of higher learning. In recent years, the field of Islamic studies in West Africa has continued to attract the attention of erudite scholars, notably in anthropology and history, who are investing in learning the languages and working on this Islamic archive. As more analytical works are done on this archive, there will be continued modification in terms of the debate on knowledge production in West Africa.

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Published 05 September 2011
Reads 1
EAN13 9782869785519
Language English
Document size 2 MB

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Negotiating the Livelihoods of Children and Youthin Africa’s Urban Spaces
Négocier sa vie : les enfants et les jeunes dans les espaces urbains d’Afrique
This book is a product of the CODESRIA Child and Youth Institute
Ce livre est une compilation des articles issus de l’institut sur l’enfance et la jeunesse du CODESRIA
Negotiating the Livelihoods of Children and Youth in Africa’s Urban Spaces
Négocier sa vie : les enfants et les jeunes dans les espaces urbains d’Afrique
Edited by
Michael F.C. Bourdillon
with Ali Sangare
Council for the Development of Social Science Research in Africa  DAKAR
©CODESRIA 2012 Council for the Development of Social Science Research in Africa Avenue Cheikh Anta Diop, Angle Canal IV BP 3304 Dakar, CP 18524, Senegal Website: www.codesria.org
ISBN: 978-2-86978-504-5
All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage or retrieval system without prior permission from CODESRIA.
Typesetting: Daouda Thiam Cover Design: Ibrahima Fofana Printing: Imprimerie Graphiplus, Dakar, Senegal
Distributed in Africa by CODESRIA Distributed elsewhere by African Books Collective, Oxford, UK Website: www.africanbookscollective.com
The Council for the Development of Social Science Research in Africa (CODESRIA) is an independent organisation whose principal objectives are to facilitate research, promote research-based publishing and create multiple forums geared towards the exchange of views and information among African researchers. All these are aimed at reducing the fragmentation of research in the continent through the creation of thematic research networks that cut across linguistic and regional boundaries.
CODESRIA publishesAfrica Development, the longest standing Africa based social science journal;Afrika Zamani, a journal of history; theAfrican Sociological Review; theAfrican Journal of International Affairs;Africa Review of Booksthe and Journal of Higher Education in Africa. The Council also co-publishes theAfrica Media Review;Identity, Culture and Politics: An Afro-Asian Dialogue;The African Anthropologistand theAfro-Arab Selections for Social Sciences. The results of its research and other activities are also disseminated through its Working Paper Series, Green Book Series, Monograph Series, Book Series, Policy Briefs and the CODESRIA Bulletin. Select CODESRIA publications are also accessible online at www.codesria.org.
CODESRIA would like to express its gratitude to the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (SIDA/SAREC), the International Develop-ment Research Centre (IDRC), the Ford Foundation, the MacArthur Foundation, the Carnegie Corporation, the Norwegian Agency for Development Coopera-tion (NORAD), the Danish Agency for International Development (DANIDA), the French Ministry of Cooperation, the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), the Netherlands Ministry of Foreign Affairs, the Rockefeller Foundation, FINIDA, the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA), the Open Society Initiative for West Africa (OSIWA), TrustAfrica, UN/UNICEF, the Afri-can Capacity Building Foundation (ACBF) and the Government of Senegal for supporting its research, training and publication programmes.
Contents
Notes on Contributors................................................................................... vii
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Introduction ............................................................................................ 1 Michael F.C. Bourdillon
Chômage et conditions d’existence des jeunes de la ville de Ouagadougou .................................................................... 17 Ali Sangaré
Familles en survie dans un espace défavorisé à Ouagadougou ...................................................................................... 33 Marie-Thérèse Arcens Somé
Villes et créativité des enfants et des jeunes au Cameroun ....... 49 Jean-Marcellin Manga
The Representations of Unaccompanied Working Migrant Male Children Negotiating for Livelihoods in a South African Border Town .............................................................. 67 Stanford Taonatose Mahati
Scavenging by Minors at Huruma Garbage Dumpsite: The Children’s Story ........................................................................... 87 Josephine Atieno Ochieng’
Les jeunes commerçants handicapés moteurs dans la négociation de la vie entre Brazzaville et Kinshasa (1970-2009) ................. 105 Jean Félix Yekoka
Youths’ Poverty and Livelihood Strategies in Fegge, Onitsha Urban Local Government Area, Nigeria ...................................... 123 Peter Ezeah
vi
9.
Negotiating the Livelihoods of Children and Youth in Africa’s Urban Spaces
Hunting and Gathering by Children and Youths in Owerri Urban, Nigeria: Negotiating Dietary Supplements .................... 135 Okechi Dominic Azuwike
10. Youth Livelihoods and Karaoke Work in Kampala’s Nightlife Spaces ................................................................................ 151 Joseph Wasswa-Matovu
11. Patronage of Local Cinema Halls among Urban Youths in Ado Ekiti, Southwest Nigeria .................................................... 169 Babatunde Joshua Omotosho
12. Dynamique urbaine et nouvelles formes de négociation de l’existence sociale : les jeunes et les « grins de thé » dans la ville de Ouagadougou ........................................................ 187 Ollo Pépin Hien
13. The Value of Socialization in Negotiating Livelihoods among the Youth: A Case of Bugembe Youth Group in Uganda ........ 201 Tabitha Naisiko
14. La « prostitution alimentaire » juvénile à Yaoundé .................... 217 Achille Pinghane Yonta
15. The Trajectories of Survival of the Mungiki Youth in Nairobi ................................................................................................ 229 Susan M. Kilonzo
Notes on Contributors
Marie-Thérèse Arcens Somé, sociologue, Institut des Science des Sociétés, Centre National pour la Recherche Scientifique et Technologique, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso.
Okechi Dominic Azuwike,of Geography and Environmental Department Management, Imo State University, Owerri, Nigeria.
Michael F.C. Bourdillon, Professor emeritus in the Department of Sociology, University of Zimbabwe, Harare.
Peter Ezeah, Department of Sociology/Anthropology, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Awka, Nigeria.
Ollo Pépin Hien, Politologue, chercheur à l’INSS/CNRST, Département de politologie, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso.
Susan M. Kilonzo,Department of Religion, Theology and Philosophy, Maseno University, Kenya.
Stanford T. Mahati, Forced Migration Studies Programme, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.
Jean-Marcellin Manga, Département de Sociologie de l’Université de Yaoundé I, Cameroun.
Joseph Wasswa-Matovu, Department of Economic Policy andPlanning,Fac-ulty of Economics and Management, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda.
Tabitha Naisiko,Graduate Studies, Uganda Martyrs Univer-of Post  School sity, Kampala, Uganda.
Josephine Atieno Ochieng’, Department of Psychology and Counselling. University of Eastern Africa, Baraton, Eldoret, Kenya.
viii
Negotiating the Livelihoods of Children and Youth in Africa’s Urban Spaces
Babatunde Joshua Omotosho, Department of the So-Sociology, Faculty of cial Sciences, University of Ado Ekiti, Nigeria.
Ali Sangare,Sociologue, Chargé de recherche à l’Institut des Sciences des Sociétés, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique et Technologique, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso.
Jean Félix Yekoka, Historien/Sociologue, IGRAC, FLSH, Université Marien Ngouabi, Brazzaville.
Achille Pinghane Yonta, Attaché d’Enseignement et de Recherche, Université de Yaoundé I / Département de Sociologie, Yaoundé, Cameroun.
1
Introduction
Michael Bourdillon
CODESRIA held a month-long institute on ‘Negotiating Children’s and Youth Livelihoods in Africa’s Urban Spaces’ (Dakar, Senegal, in September 2009). The twenty participants were senior and junior academic researchers, both Francophone and Anglophone, from universities and related institutions throughout the continent. This book brings together much of the research and ideas that were presented at 1 the institute or resulted from it. Problems facing children and youth in African cities have been widely documented and have received much recent attention. African populations have high growth rates and, consequently, relatively high proportions of young people. Population growth in rural areas has stretched resources leading to urban migration and a rapid growth of cities. Economies have not grown apace with the population; and in some countries economies have even shrunk. The result is a severe lack of resources in cities to meet the needs of the growing populations, shown in high unemployment, inadequate housing, poor services, and often extreme poverty. All the essays in this book draw attention to such urban environments, in which children and youth have to live and survive. We have specific detail on the problems in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso. Ali Sangare’s research on unemployment (chapter 2) shows the problems typically faced by youth in many African cities, and how they develop means to deal with city life. In particular, degrees and diplomas are no longer guarantees of future employment. Marie-Thérèse Arcens Somé (chapter 3) shows the lack of resources and services faced by families and their younger children in poor areas, and various initiatives taken by families to overcome the resulting problems. While not all those living in urban areas face the same problems, and not all cities are the same, these two studies illustrate the plight of many children and youth among Africa’s urban poor.
Who are children and who are youth? International documents like the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (1989) define children as those under the age of eighteen or the legal age of majority. The broader term ‘youth’