Poverty Alleviation Pathways for Achieving Sustainable Development Goals in Africa
226 Pages
English
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Poverty Alleviation Pathways for Achieving Sustainable Development Goals in Africa

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226 Pages
English

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The inability to eradicate poverty among societies demands a synergistic approach. This calls for the development of multi-pronged pathways for transitioning towards sustainable development goals. Many of these have been developed and tested across the world. Some have proved to be effective in illuminating the underlying cause of the world's inability to eradicate poverty. This is being driven by the fact that sustainable development, as a global development concept, represents a multidimensional phenomenon that includes many different indicators of human development. This volume, which derives from the papers presented at the seventh Africa Unity for Renaissance Conference that was held at Freedom Park, Pretoria, South Africa, seeks to supplement existing pathways by highlighting Africa's approach to poverty alleviation, which can possibly be attained through enhanced nutrition, food security, energy and gender equity. Evidence presented reflects strengths, weaknesses and opportunities on how Africa can transition towards sustainable development goals. The information provided is useful to countries interested in assisting Africa to develop pathways for achieving sustainable development goals within the scope of Agenda 2063. The book is a good reference for policy makers, academics, government authorities and students interested in research and developmental studies.

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Published 28 October 2020
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EAN13 9780798305389
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Poverty Alleviation Pathways for Achieving Sustainable Development Goals in Africa
Thokozani Simelane, Lavhelesani R. Managa and Mammo Muchie (eds.)
Poverty Alleviation Pathways for Achieving Sustainable Development Goals in Africa
Thokozani Simelane, Lavhelesani R. Managaand Mammo Muchie (eds)
Poverty alleviation Pathways For Achieving Sustainable Development Goals in Africa
First Published in 2020 by the Africa Institute of South Africa Private Bag X41 Pretoria South Africa, 0001
ISBN: 9780798305082
© Copyright Africa Institute of South Africa 2020
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The Africa Institute of South Africa is a think tank and research organisation, focusing on political, socioeconomic, international and development issues in contemporary Africa. The Institute conducts research, publishes books, monographs, occasional papers, policy briefs and a quarterly journal – Africa Insight. The Institute holds regular seminars on issues of topical interest. It is also home to one of the best library and documentation centres worldwide, with materials on every African country.
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Table of Contents
Acknowledgements. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i
Forewordii. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
About the Edîtors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
About the Contrîbutorsvi. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Abbrevîatîons and Acronyms. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CHAPTER 1 Interconnectîons between the Sustaînable Development Goals. . . . . . . . . 1 Thokozani Simelane, Mammo Muchie and Lavhelesani R. Managa
SECTION A POVERTY ALLEVIATION PATHWAYS THROUGH NUTRITION AND FOOD SECURITY
CHAPTER 2 Poverty Allevîatîon through Decentralîsed Publîc servîce Provîsîon of the Dîstrîct Assemblîes în the Central Regîon of Ghana. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Christopher DickSagoe and Peter AsareNuamah
CHAPTER 3 Sustaînabîlîty of Poverty Relîef Projects. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 An Evaluative Case study of Matsika Irrigation Scheme in Thulamela Municipality, South Africa Tsetselelani Decide Mdhluli , Pfarelo Matshidze and Stewart Lee Kugara
CHAPTER 4 Identîfyîng the Rural Economîc Growth, Poverty Allevîatîon, and Sustaînable Lîvelîhoods Nexus în the Masvîngo Provînce of Zîmbabwe. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Tafadzwa Clementine Maramura, Ogochukwu Iruoma Nzewi and David Mago
CHAPTER 5 Contrîbutîon of Technologîcal Inventîons în Improvîng Food Securîty under Changîng Clîmate Condîtîons. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Tšepiso A. Rantšo
CHAPTER 6 Enhancîng Food Securîty and Nutrîtîon through Dehydrated Soups Usîng Locally Avaîlable Ingredîents în Mozambîque. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 Cândida da Graça Mavie, Jose da Cruz Francisco and Lucas Daniel Tivana
CHAPTER 7 Achîevîng Dîetary Adequacy for Mîcronutrîents through Bîofortîicatîon. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Progress and Prospect Review Lavhelesani R. Managa
SECTION B POVERTY ALLEVIATION PATHWAYS THROUGH RENEWABLE ENERGY
CHAPTER 8 Adoptîon and Adaptatîon to Renewable Energy în Mozambîque. . . . . .109 Thokozani Simelane
CHAPTER 9 The Best Potentîal Locatîon for a Wînd Energy Farm at the Kîng Cetshwayo Dîstrîct Munîcîpalîty, KwaZulu-Natal. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .128 Sibonakaliso Shadrack Nhlabathi
CHAPTER 10 Optîmîsîng the Contrîbutîon of Scîence Technology and Innovatîon în Afrîca’s Development. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .158 Reflection on Energy, the Social Connection Model and Afrocommunitarian Ethics James Ojochenemi David
CHAPTER 11 Afrîca Requîres the Socîal and Solîdarîty Economîc Model to Drîve îts Development Trajectory. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .183. . . Francis Onditi
CHAPTER 12 Conclusîon. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .205 Thokozani Simelane and Lavhelesani R. Managa
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
The book derives from seventh African Unity for Renaissance International Conference that was organised by Human Sciences Research Council in partnership with Department of Science and Innovation (DSI), National Research Foundation (NRF), Tshwane University of Technology (TUT), Water Research Commission (WRC), Thabo Mbeki African Leadership Institute (TMALI), Department of Public Enterprise (DPE), Brand SA, International Council for Science (ICSU), and University of Johannesburg (UJ). The finan-cial support which these institutions provided, together with participants and chapter contributors are greatly acknowledged.
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Foreword
The United Nations Summit held from 25 to 27 September 2015 (in New York) epitomised a turning point in the world’s development aspirations. Participating nations adopted the post-2015 development agenda and a set of sustainable development goals (SDGs). These are enumerated in the document:our World: the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Transforming 1 Development.document is the outcome of successful negotiations The among the parties.
It can be argued that indications of a convergence towards reaching an agreement emerged during the seventeenth Conference of the Parties (COP 17) in Durban. This became a reality in Paris when successful negotiations were concluded at COP 21. This link between Durban and Paris points to the possibility of a vital connection between Africa and the world in carving out the global agenda.
Africa, through the slogan ‘Silencing the Guns by 2020’, is again at the forefront of containing the negative impacts of conflicts on the continent through mediation and peace-keeping efforts. Closer ties and coordinated efforts between Africa and the world can therefore go a long way in showing exemplary leadership and giving direction to the African continent; espe-cially in ensuring stability and sustainable development in Africa.
In the development space the sustainable development goals (SDGs) have replaced the millennium development goals (MDGs) as a new, post-2015 de-velopment agenda. Concurrently, the African Union has created a blueprint for Africa’s development in the form of Agenda 2063, ‘The Africa We Want’.
Against this background, a shift in the balance of influence among Africa’s development partners has been observed. The growing role of China as an alternative to Africa’s development aspirations through its Belt and Road Initiative, and other initiatives such as FOCAC (Forum on China-Africa Co-operation) indicates the need to re-think Africa’s position on and its response to the international development models that have a direct impact on poverty and inequality.
In this new development paradigm, Africa has ratified the Continental Free Trade Agreement, which seeks to leverage Africa’s economic strength, thus providing impetus to the realisation and implementation of Agenda 2063 and sustainable development goals on the continent; particularly as
the sustainable development goals are considered to be a plan of action for people, the planet and prosperity, that seeks to promote universal peace.
The successes and failures during the epoch of the MDGs provide important lessons for Africa. As has been widely documented, most programmes that sought to achieve millennium development goals in Africa were donor fund-ed, with additional support coming from emerging economies such as the Group of 77, China and BRICS. Efforts to achieve MDG-based targets have had some stimulus in taking Africa forward. It improved the lives of most people in Africa. It can thus be said that in spite of food, energy, financial and economic shocks, Africa benefited substantially from the MDGs era.
A number of the MDGs were successfully incorporated into the national development plans and strategies of most African countries. The MDG progress and monitoring of gaps have forced these countries to continue to allocate resources towards the achievement of MDGs. As a result, some of the poorest countries in Africa have made improvements in areas such as education and health. For example, in Ethiopia and Tanzania, primary school enrolment rates have doubled. Malawi and Algeria have become food exporters. Rates of HIV infection have fallen significantly in sub-Saharan Africa, while reported malaria cases have been halved in countries such as Rwanda and Zambia.
While these achievements have been attained through MDGs, loopholes still exist with regard to the implementation of the programmes, as well as the capacity to monitor and evaluate the impacts in general. Poverty and inequality are also persistent challenges in Africa. Because of this truth, it is argued that in some African countries the MDGs did not have the desired effects. A major criticism of the MDGs is that they missed out on crucial dimensions of development such as human rights, good governance and se-curity. In most countries, civil society has been excluded from the planning and formulation of development strategies. There has been a major failure to integrate the private sector and civil society as crucial development actors, an issue which the Busan Partnership for Effective Development Cooperation is emphasising.
Based on these observations, this volume, which derives from the Africa Unity for Renaissance Conference, seeks to provide pathways for achiev-ing sustainable development goals in Africa. Information contained in the chapters highlight the strengths, weaknesses and opportunities for African states to achieve sustainable development goals. The information provided
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is useful to countries that are interested in assisting African countries to develop effective programmes linked to sustainable development goals.
Prof Crain Soudien Chief Executive Human Sciences Research Council
NOTES AND REFERENCES
1
United Nations, 2015.Transfroming our World: the 2030 Agenda for Sustain-able Development. Unanimously adopted by United Nations General Assembly (UNGA) during the United Nations Summit held from 25 – 27 September 2015, in New York. Available at https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/content/docu-ments/21252030%20Agenda%20for%20Sustainable%20Development%20web. pdf [Accessed 13 January 2020].
About the Editors
Thokozani Simelane serves as programme leader for Science and Technology at the Africa Institute of South Africa (AISA), which is within the Human Sciences Research Council (HSRC). Having worked for South African National Parks, the South African Bureau of Standards (SABS) and the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), he has in-depth knowledge of systems, processes and business operations of a broad spec-trum of organisations. He currently serves on the Africa Steering Committee of the Department of Public Enterprises, the Africa Focus Committee of the HSRC, and on the board of AISA Publications. He previously served on the Standing Advisory Committee on Intellectual Property Rights (SACIP), the Research Ethics Committee of the HSRC and the South African Chapter of the System Dynamics Society. He is a senior research fellow at the South African Research Chairs Initiative (SARChi) at Tshwane University of Technology. He holds a PhD and Doctor of Engineering degrees.
Mammo Muchieis a Professor of Technology Innovation studies at the Tshwane University of Technology where he heads a SARChi Chair on Innovation Studies. He is an A NRF-rated research professor and fellow of the South African Academy of Sciences, the African Academy of Sciences and the African Scientific Institute. He serves as adjunct professor at the Adama Science and Technology University, the Addis Ababa University, the University of Gondar and the Arsi University in Ethiopia. He also serves as a senior research associate at the Technology and Management Centre for Development at Oxford University. He is one of the founding members of the Globelics initiative, which initiated a new relationship between Northern and Southern researchers by focusing research on the challenges of build-ing African innovation systems. He is a scientific board member of the net-work that connects North Africa to the Middle East and Southern Europe. He holds a DPhil from the University of Sussex in the United Kingdom.
Lavhelesani R. Managais a researcher in Science and Technology Programme of AISA, which is within the HSRC. He previously worked at the Department of Plant Production of the University of Venda, the Roots Biology Lab at Penn State University and Agricultural Research Council (ARC). He holds an MSc degree (cum laude) in Plant Breeding from the University of South Africa (Unisa).
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