The Future of Africa
544 Pages
English
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The Future of Africa

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544 Pages
English

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This provocative book on The Future of Africa addresses fundamental genealogical developmental challenges of vital concern to Africa's transformation is premised on the orientation that the continent's future is up to Africans, cognizant of the fact that Africans cohabit the same diversified and inter-connected planet with others. The issues addressed include: political, economic, social and technological reconstruction of Africa, the richest but the least developed part of the world; the need to fight the pandemic of inequality and social injustice; chronic corruption; the urgent need to usher the rule of law and of putting in place strategies addressing abject poverty; the empowerment of the female gender and youths; the comprehensive development and proper utilisation of indigenous knowledge systems in partnership with modern science and technology to energize infrastructural development and the industrialisation prowess of the continent. The book unveils vast inadequacies that need to be rectified to give the continent a new face uplift. It is a comprehensive, Afro-centric cross-cutting edge publication that structurally examines outstanding issues plaguing Africa as it advances critical priority policy proposals for the future of the continent. Policymakers, students, organisations and institutions will find the book indispensable for the sustainable transformation of the continent. The underlying message is 'development with a human face' and without leaving anyone behind.

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Published 19 October 2020
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EAN13 9789956551439
Language English
Document size 10 MB

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the same diversified and inter-connected planet with others. The
the world; the need to fight the pandemic of inequality and social injustice; chronic corruption; the urgent need to usher the rule of law and of putting in place strategies addressing abject poverty; the empowerment of the female gender and youths; the comprehensive development and proper utilisation of indigenous knowledge systems in partnership with modern science and technology to energize infrastructural development and the industrialisation prowess of the continent. The book unveils vast inadequacies that need to be rectified to give the continent a new face uplift. It is a comprehensive, Afro-centric cross-cutting edge publication that structurally examines outstanding issues plaguing Africa as it advances critical priority policy proposals for the future of the continent. Policymakers, students, organisations and institutions will find the book indispensable for the sustainable transformation of the continent. The underlying message is ‘development with a human face’ and without leaving anyone behind.
holds educational qualifications from the Universities of Lund (Sweden), Hull and Salford (UK) in Political Science, Science and Technology Policy, European Politics and Economic History; and a Diploma, London School of Journalism. He has taught at the Universities of Yaoundé; Yaoundé 11-Soa, and Buea; and served as Sub-Director in the Cameroon Ministry of Scientific Research. John Forje was one of the first recipients of the Prof Archie Mafeje Fellowship Award; and for three conservative terms, Member of the First (2008), Second (2011) and Third (2013) Adjudication Panel of the All African Public Service Innovation Awards of the African Union and Conference of African Ministers of the Public Service. He has authored many books and scientific articles.
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THE FUTURE OF AFRICA Reform, Development, Progress or Progressive Decline
John W. Forje
Langaa Research & Publishing CIG Mankon, Bamenda
Publisher:LangaaRPCIG Langaa Research & Publishing Common Initiative Group P.O. Box 902 Mankon Bamenda North West Region Cameroon Langaagrp@gmail.comwww.langaa-rpcig.net Distributed in and outside N. America by African Books Collective orders@africanbookscollective.com www.africanbookscollective.com
ISBN-10:9956-551-89-9
ISBN-13: 978-9956-551-89-7
©John W. Forje 2020 All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, mechanical or electronic, including photocopying and recording, or be stored in any information storage or retrieval system, without written permission from the publisher
Table of Contents Acknowledgements .............................................................. v Preface .................................................................................. vii Introduction: facing the realities and challenges of our time ................................................... xxxi Chapter One A historical perspective: The gospel according to the West from colonialism to independence – From the OAU to the AU ..................................................... 1 Chapter Two The nexus of science, technology and indigenous knowledge architecture.............................. 55 Chapter Three Gender power – Neglected but rising and important ......... 75 Chapter Four Regional economic communities ........................................ 89 Chapter Five The diaspora – Africa’s sixth region .................................... 129 Chapter Six Pan-Africanism and Renaissance Africa.............................. 165 Chapter Seven Facing the new invasion ...................................................... 183 Chapter Eight The military and security nexus challenges: Problems and solutions ........................................................ 215 Chapter Nine The social dimension ........................................................... 263
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Chapter Ten The pandemic of corruption ................................................ 279 Chapter Eleven The energy of development.................................................. 307 Chapter Twelve Conclusion: A wake-up call for Africa ................................. 321 Appendences ........................................................................ 369
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Acknowledgements Even though views expressed in this publication are entirely mine, I am nevertheless deeply grateful and indebted to a number of people, friends, and colleagues who have, over the years been of particular help. I have and continue to benefit from books published by other colleagues; from institutions who have furnished me with numerous data and other materials. The list is long. It would be unfair to mention only some. To all, I extend my thanks and deep appreciation. I would like to extend my deep appreciation to my publisher for a wonderful job well done. The preparation of this volume puts the entire CARAD Family into serious debts of appreciation to many people. To all, we extend our profound appreciation for the support and patience. Let us live in hope and not despair about the future of the continent and that we can get a little intoxicated on what we trust will be considered to be vintage results, for us all in the future. It is about transforming Africa’s future or propelling Africa into a different future through exploring how the discipline of anticipation can have been shaped and applied in Africa and how it can be deliberately leveraged towards transforming the continent’s future onto more positive trajectories. We are very conscious that, in aiming at a moving target from moving a platform, my views on this vast complex subject and complicated continent with all its positive potentialities, diversities and conflicts, our views are not likely to coincide with those of the many helpers and the reading public. With more than the normal fervour, therefore, we absolve from responsibility all others the mistakes and shortcomings of the views herein expressed but deplore every reader to continue the discourse(mijadala) of moving Africa in the right direction and purpose. Last, but by no means least, I am extremely grateful to all these who in different ways contributed to the publication of the book, It is my conviction that the fundamentals here discussed and analysed will govern power and politics and the process of socio-economic transformation in Africa and relations between the continent and the outside world regardless of which individual state governance or group of states may be in control of the governmental and administrative apparatus at any given time. Rephrased differently, no matter who takes over the reign of power in any African country at the dawn of tomorrow, and regardless of his/her ideological orientation, the reality here discussed will have to be contended and adequately addressed to
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save Africa from further decline and destruction. Actions not just words are needed to effectively make the changes that are required for our common good. My family has been very supportive in many aspects. I wish to express my heartfelt gratitude for their support without which the publication would not have been possible. I remain responsible for the shortcomings of the publication. Let us jointly build the Africa We Want for Our Common Good and Posterity without Leaving Any One Behind. John W. Forje nd 22 April, 2019
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PrefaceThis book is motivated by the events of 2011, “The Arab Spring” coming as a tsunami and, reshaping the political construct of the Africa continent north of the Sahara, as well as its eventual consequences on the rest of the continent, south of the Sahara. Events in Tunisia could be likened with the actions taken in the United States of America that faithful morning by Rosa Parks, the role of Martin Luther King Jr. and the eventual arrival of Barrack Obama in the White House in 2008. It is premised on the idea that Africa’s future is up to Africans; and that st the 21 century and beyond will be shaped by what happens not just in Berlin, Rome, London, Paris, Moscow, Washington, Mexico, Delhi but what happens across Africa, from Banjul to the Horn and from the Cape to Cairo. It is further strengthened by the quiet or silent revolutions that took place in Algeria and Sudan with the overwhelming force of ‘people’s silent power’ overthrowing their long serving despotic authoritarian leaders. Will the rest of the continent follow these countries pattern of a progressive, non-violent silent political reaction in the change of long-seated heads of states that have for long clouded the political landscape of the continent? It is evidently clear that the recent events in Algeria and Sudan creates some new positive political dynamics for the continent’s civil society to continue wearing the new garment of progressive Afrocentric game changing attitude without throwing a stone. Democratic empowerment of the African civil society is important as this touches every aspect of the political rights of the citizen. The emergence of new forms of democracy in Africa at the national, regional and continental level is important for the sustainable transformation the region. The democratic empowerment of the people is a healthy sign for development and quality welfare of the citizens. One of the immediate effects of the Arab Spring was the disappearance of the strongest advocates of African Unity - Colonel Ghaddaffi of Libya - after Kwame Nkrumah. How this impacts the construct of a United States of Africa in 2017 has yet to be diagnosed. We are now biding fare voyage to 2017, the year Africa is expected to be united. Unfortunately, the continent is far away from the unity it started preaching as the bases for the self-determination struggle and building a new continent. What is clear – Africa is suffering from a serious leadership deficiency syndrome (SLDS) and passive civil society syndrome (PSCS). To a large extent, the ideal of a continental free trade
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zone is growing seeing the daylight to enhance the growth, integration and unity of the continent. With the departure of Colonel Ghaddaffi another vacuum has occurred in the ‘unity space’ like the physical disappearance of Kwame Nkrumah from the African political scene? Another strong advocate of an Untied States of Africa, President Wade of Senegal was shown the exit door(like that of Obasanjo Olusegun and Thabo Mbeki),following his defeat at the presidential elections of March 2012. Another advocate of African Unity, Africa’s longest serving Head of State, President Mugabe st of Zimbabwe (37 years in power) on 21 November 2017 forced to quit the political scene. Is Africa an orphan or will Africa rise again? Will someone vindicate Ghaddaffi like President Julius Nyerere did in respect of Kwame Nkrumah? The answer is blowing in the wind. There is always something new in Africa as Zimbabwe exhibited a new form of military dictate in the governance structure of continent. It has been the end of road for Africa’s dinosaurs – Robert Mugabe, Abdul-Aziz Bouteflika, and Omar al Bashir while others like Paul Biya, Idris Derby and many others are still hanging on to power and governing their countries with iron fist. The recent events in Algeria and Sudan show that new political dynamics are unfolding on the continent and that the continent needs collaborative environment in the spirit of a United Africa taking place under the Baobab tree – the true consensus of African cultural heritage. The continent since 2000 lost most of its visionaries, Nelson Mandela included (see Vandyck (2019). Africa is currently undergoing a deadly game of chess but will triumph in the end – the result of people’s power as the true custodian of authority in any society. In spite of the new scramble for Africa victory will be on the side of the people one day. But for this victory or potential to be unlocked the new rising force of the county/continent must have exploited in the right way. African youths and women hold the key to the future, but they must be empowered to have access to health and education – the essential engines of economic growth. Healthy and educated and empowered women and the youths will shape the future of not only Africa but the world. Therefore, the neglect of the youths and women in any development strategy is destroying the present and future of the continent. They hold the key to unlocking the doors of poverty and underdevelopment. It requires investing and empowering them. Even though the gender gap is shrinking, but progress remains uneven. African countries must seek for ways to chip away at the barriers preventing women from achieving her full economic potential.
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Isa Shivji (2006:213) quoting Nyerere (1997) was emphatic on the disappearance of Kwame Nkrumah from the helm of African political limelight. “Kwame Nkrumah was the greatest crusader for African unity. We did not even discuss a mechanism for pursuing the objective of a politically United Africa. We had a Liberation Committee already. We should have at least had a Unity Committee or undertaken to establish one. We did not. And after Kwame Nkrumah was removed from the African political scene nobody took up the challenge again”. Another advocate of African unity has just been thrown out of the African political landscape. Is the Renaissance Train receiving a setback or moving forward? The publication begs these simple questions: what are the innovative foresight concepts, tools and planning methods that are necessary to transform Africa’s future? How should we strengthen the anticipatory capabilities of African policy maker’s practitioners and planners? In which ways can we allow the private, public and civil society to input debate and interrogate the thinking, application and potentials for partnerships as fundamental ingredients to shaping the continent’s future? How can we encourage the conceptualisation – ‘Thinking African Futures’ as a discipline within the educational curriculum of the continent? There is increasing talk about the future of Africa; instead of focusing only on the present and the past. In addition, voices have been raised about an ‘African Renaissance’ and how Africans can take advantages of existing scientific and technological advancements and exert more control of their own future. African countries have shifted from the ‘Five-Year National Development Plans to a longer-term planning vision of 2020, 2025, 2030, 2035, and African Union (AU) Vision 2063 as emerging new directions. Seen from these perspectives, the future has invited itself into the discourse of development. Therefore, it is time to interrogate how Africans are ‘thinking African futures’ as a basis for beginning to rethink the future of Africa. This publication is a part of evolving discourse on: Conceptualisations of African futures – comprehensive audit and history of African futures; How is the future of Africa being conceptualised? Why must the future of this great continent be conceptualised as a discipline? Who is conceptualising the future of Africa? Whose futures are being considered and why? Whose interests have been served? What must this generation do in ensuring a good future for Africa?
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