254 Pages
English

The Place of Work in African Childhoods

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This book is about how work enters and affects the lives of children in Africa, taking for granted neither the traditional values surrounding children's work, nor the international standards against it. Many African societies nurture their children on the ingrained notion that children must work as part of their process of growing up. Children participate in their families and communities through the work they do in the house and in whatever else their families do. Such views are, however, antithetical to the dominant views in Europe and North America which see childhood as a time of freedom from responsibility and economic activity. These views have become so popular with the elites in other countries to the extent that they now drive international campaigns against 'child labour', and have been incorporated into what are now considered universal international standards and conventions. This book was conceived within the framework of the CODESRIA tradition of taking African perspectives seriously and not allowing social research in Africa to become subservient to values from outside. African scholars remain keenly aware of the need not to isolate themselves from developments in the wider world, which could lead to stagnation. This book, through empirical observation of the lives of African children, the work they do, its place in their lives, and what the children say about it, proposes new perspectives towards a new understanding of this complex stage of human development. Work is not simply about the right to income: work provides identity and status in society, and participation in the community. People relate to one another through work. Those who do not work are often without status and are at the periphery of society. One of the major ways in which this book differs from most of the available literature is in the understanding it brings to the problem of 'child labour'. There are economic reasons why children may need an income of their own. There is the demographic fact that the proportion of children to adults in low-income countries is nearly double that in high-income societies. This book attempts to demonstrate that work is both necessary and beneficial in terms of a child's development to become a full, responsible, and respectable member of society.

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Published by
Published 19 October 2015
Reads 1
EAN13 9782869786523
Language English
Document size 4 MB

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The Place of Work in African Childhoods
La place du travail chez les enfants africains
This book is a product of CODESRIA’s Child and Youth Institute.
Ce livre est une compilation des articles issus de l’institut sur l’enfance et la jeunesse du CODESRIA.
The Place of Work in African Childhoods
La place du travail chez les enfants africains
Edited by /Sous la direction de Michael Bourdillon Georges M. Mutambwa
Council for the Development of Social Science Research in Africa  DAKAR
©CODESRIA 2014 Council for the Development of Social Science Research in Africa Avenue Cheikh Anta Diop, Angle Canal IV BP 3304 Dakar, 18524, Senegal Website: www.codesria.org
ISBN: 978-2-86978-597-7
All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage or retrieval system without prior permission from CODESRIA.
Typesetting: Daouda Thiam Cover Design: Ibrahima Fofana Printing: Imprimerie Graphiplus, Dakar, Senegal
Distributed in Africa by CODESRIA Distributed elsewhere by African Books Collective, Oxford, UK Website: www.africanbookscollective.com
The Council for the Development of Social Science Research in Africa (CODESRIA) is an independent organisation whose principal objectives are to facilitate research, promote research-based publishing and create multiple forums geared towards the exchange of views and information among African researchers. All these are aimed at reducing the fragmentation of research in the continent through the creation of thematic research networks that cut across linguistic and regional boundaries.
CODESRIA publishesAfrica Development, the longest standing Africa based social science journal;Afrika Zamani, a journal of history; theAfrican Sociological Review; theAfrican Journal of International Affairs;Africa Review of Booksthe and Journal of Higher Education in Africa. The Council also co-publishes theAfrica Media Review;Identity, Culture and Politics: An Afro-Asian Dialogue;The African Anthropologistand theAfro-Arab Selections for Social Sciences. The results of its research and other activities are also disseminated through its Working Paper Series, Green Book Series, Monograph Series, Book Series, Policy Briefs and the CODESRIA Bulletin. Select CODESRIA publications are also accessible online at www.codesria.org.
CODESRIA would like to express its gratitude to the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (SIDA), the International Development Research Centre (IDRC), the Ford Foundation, the Carnegie Corporation of New York (CCNY), the Norwegian Agency for Development Cooperation (NORAD), the Danish Agency for International Development (DANIDA), the French Ministry of Cooperation, the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), the Netherlands Ministry of Foreign Affairs, the Rockefeller Foundation, the Open Society Foundations (OSFs), TrustAfrica, UNESCO, UN Women, the African Capacity Building Foundation (ACBF) and the Government of Senegal for supporting its research, training and publication programmes.
Contents/Sommaire
Contributors/Contributeurs ............................................................................vii
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Introduction: Children’s Work in Africa .............................................. 1 Michael Bourdillon
Work Opportunities and Frictions for Rural Child Migrants in West African Cities .......................................................................... 21 Dorte Thorsen
Children’s Motivation for Migration and Engagement in Labour in the City of Accra ................................................................ 39 Yaw Ofosu-Kusi
Repenser la question du travail en RDC: une approche sociolinguistique des activités de l’enfant à Lubumbashi .............. 55 Georges Mulumbwa Mutambwa
Children and Employers’ Perspectives on Child Work: A Case Study of Weaving Children in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia .................. 75 Seleshi Zeleke
Child Domestic Work in Cameroon: An Exploratory Study of Perceptions by Working Children ...................................... 93 Joseph Lah Lo-oh
Enfants et vente d’eau dans les artères de Brazzaville : un nouveau dynamisme d’un travail à la criée ............................... 107 Analyse Kimpolo
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La place du travail dans la vie des enfants talibés évoluant dans des daaras de type traditionnel à Saint-Louis ....................... 125 Cina Gueye
Travail des enfants et éducation en Côte d’Ivoire : les perceptions des nounous mineures d’Abidjan .......................... 147 Affoué Philomène Koffi
Compatibility of Work and School: Informal School Work Arrangements in Central Kenya ....................................................... 165 Gladwell Wambiri
Effets des travaux domestiques sur la scolarité des enfants au Togo : cas des écoliers de la ville de Lomé et du village d’Adétikopé ......................................................................................... 185 Komi N’Kere
Travail et scolarisation : modes d’affiliation des enfants au double emploi en milieu périurbain de Kalaban-Coro (Mali) .......................................................................... 201 Moriké Dembéé
Négociations d’existence par les enfants des militaires à Kisangani ........................................................................................... 221 Edmond Mokuinema Bomfie
Concluding Reflections ...................................................................... 237 Michael Bourdillon
Contributors/Contributeurs
Michael Bourdillon is Professor Emeritus in the Department of Sociology, University of Zimbabwe, where he taught for over 25 years. He also taught at the University of Calabar, Nigeria. He received his doctorate in Social Anthropology at Oxford University. He has published extensively on children’s work, and is a co-author ofChildren’s WorkRights and Wrongs of (Rutgers University Press, 2010).
Moriké Dembéléest Assistant à l’Université des Lettres et Sciences Humaines (ULSH) Bamako III. Détenteur d’un Mater II en Sciences de l’éducation surLa rééducation et la réinsertion des jeunes délinquants dans les centres spécialisés de Bollé au Mali, il achève dans le prolongement de ce travail une thèse de doctorat surLa resocialisation institutionnelle des enfants en situation difficile et son influence sur leur réinsertion sociale au Mali et au Sénégalà l’Université Cheikh Anta Diop de Dakar.
Cina Guèyeest titulaire d’un DEA en sociologie et d’un DESS en management des ressources humaines. Elle est doctorante en socio-anthropologie en cotutelle de thèse entre l’Université Gaston Berger de Saint-Louis et l’Université Lumière/ Lyon 2. Ses centres d’intérêts scientifiques portent sur la sociologie de la jeunesse et la sociologie des migrations.
Analyse Kimpoloune ancienne élève de l’école normale supérieure de est l’Université Marien Ngouabi, Congo Brazzaville. Elle est spécialisée en littératures fricaines francophones, ce qui lui a permis de présenter son diplôme d’études approfondies. Elle est professeur des lycées ; chargée de cours de poésie à l’Université Marien Ngouabi, elle s’intéresse, entre autres, aux questions de l’identité et elle prépare sa thèse sur le thème: la quête identitaire dans l’œuvre poétique de Jean- Baptiste Tati Loutard.
Affoué Philomène KoffiInspectrice d’Orientation au Ministère de est l’Enseignement Technique et de la Formation Professionnelle de Côte d’Ivoire. Elle est membre du Réseau Ouest et Centre Africain de Recherche en Education (ROCARE) depuis 2006. Elle a participé en tant que chercheuse en Education à de nombreuses études à la Coordination Nationale du ROCARE en Côte d’Ivoire.
viii
The Place of Work in African Childhoods – La place du travail chez les enfants africains
Elle est membre du CODESRIA et prépare en ce moment un doctorat en Sociologie de l’Education à l’Université de Cocody.
Joseph Lah Lo-ohteaches Human Development, Child and Adolescent Psychology and Educational Sciences in the Faculty of Education at the University of Buea, Cameroon. He also directs a youth research and service facility, the Centre for Productive Youth Development Cameroon. Lo-oh holds a B.Ed. in Curriculum Studies, an M.Ed. in Educational Psychology and a PhD in Developmental Psychology from the University of Buea, Cameroon. He researches on transitions, focusing on childhood, adolescence, and emerging adulthood.
Georges Mulumbwa Mutambwaest linguiste africaniste et psychologue du travail. Il est titulaire d’un doctorat en Langues et Lettres de l’Université Libre de Bruxelles (Belgique) et professeur à l’Université de Lubumbashi (en RDC). Dans la plupart de ses études, il aborde les faits sociaux en partant des faits linguistiques. Il a eu l’occasion de participer à plusieurs enquêtes socio-anthropologiques incluant la jeunesse, mais aussi d’en conduire un certain nombre d’entre elles commanditées soit par l’UNICEF, la Coopération Universitaire au Développement avec les universités belges, soit par des ONG internationales.
Komi N’Kere, Docteur en Géographie Urbaine et Economique, est enseignant-chercheur à l’Université de Lomé. Ses domaines d’enseignement et de recherche portent sur le commerce de détail, la cartographie, l’éducation et les pratiques de résilience face aux changements climatiques. Il est membre du Réseau Ouest et Centre Africain de Recherche en Education et du Conseil pour le Développement de la Recherche en Sciences Sociales en Afrique. Il est théologien, pasteur et dirige une église locale à Lomé.
Yaw Ofosu-Kusiteaches social studies and economics at the Department of Social Studies, University of Education, Winneba, Ghana, and is also the Director of the University’s Office of International Relations. He was the Director for CODESRIA’s 2011 Child and Youth Studies Institute. He has for many years researched and published on child labour and street children in Ghana. He is currently researching on children’s life and work in a large informal settlement in Accra, Ghana.
Dorte Thorsenis a post-doctoral research fellow in Anthropology, University of Sussex, UK. Her research focuses on migration in and from West Africa and examines how migrants’ motivations and experiences are embedded in social networks and, in particular, kinship relations. Between 2005 and 2010 she carried out research with children and youth from rural Burkina Faso who had migrated
Contributors – Contributeurs
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to Ouagadougou and Abidjan and, currently she engages in a collaborative re-search programme exploring the new geographies of West African migrations.
Gladwell Njeri Wambirihas a doctorate degree in childhood studies. She is a lecturer in the Department of Early Childhood Studies, Kenyatta University. She has a wealth of experience in conducting research with children and families. She has presented several research papers on child and family issues in workshops and conferences. Currently, she is researching parent and children’s perspectives on involvement of children in household chores in urban Kenya.
Seleshi Zelekeis an Assistant Professor at the Institute of Psychology, Addis Ababa University. He has been teaching at Addis Ababa University since 1995. Alongside his teaching role, Seleshi has researched on several issues including child rights, child rearing practices, and gender, and has published in local and international journals. At present, his research interests are in the areas of child protection, child work and schooling, and child abuse.
Edmond Mokuinema Bomfieest Professeur Associé à l’Université de Kisangani et à l’Institut Supérieur de Développement Rural où il enseigne notamment les cours d’Aménagement du Territoire et d’Analyse des politiques de développement. Il s’intéresse également aux Alternatives Sud et aux mouvements sociaux. Il a successivement été Chef de Département de Sociologie, Vice-Doyen de l’Enseignement à la Faculté des sciences sociales, administratives et politiques, actuellement Doyen de la Faculté de Droit de l’Université de Kisangani.