The Ways We Stretch Toward One Another
154 Pages
English
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The Ways We Stretch Toward One Another

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Gain access to the library to view online
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154 Pages
English

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The Ways We Stretch Toward One Another is a collection of essays on the work of Pamela Reynolds. The essays take cues from Reynolds’ decades-long contributions to the field of anthropology in different ways. The authors weave Reynolds’ groundbreaking scholarship on the anthropology of childhood––of labour, of family, of resistance, justice, war and suffering––through the terms of their own work, in places and contexts that may at first appear quite distant from the villages of Zimbabwe and townships of South Africa that feature in Reynolds’ ethnographies. The Ways We Stretch Toward One Another is about anthropologists stretching in thought and practice toward one another, between generations, toward the people encountered in the field, through worlds entered and past, and how, in turn, these worlds lean into our own. At the core of each essay is a question about how we learn, how we pass lessons on, how we assume the mantle of anthropology for understanding the contemporary world––something that often requires folding intellectual friendships into the tools of our practice. The Ways We Stretch Toward One Another demonstrates how a master anthropologist has come to shape the priorities of others, in terms that are both creative and aware. Contributors: Thomas Cousins, Stefanos Geroulanos, Todd Meyers, Pamela Reynolds, Fiona Ross, and Vaibhav Saria; and a Foreword by Francis B. Nyamnjoh

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Published 26 September 2017
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EAN13 9789956763719
Language English
Document size 2 MB

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Reynolds’ decades-long contributions to the field of anthropology in different ways. The authors weave Reynolds’ groundbreaking scholarship on the anthropology of childhood––of labour, of family, of resistance, justice, war and suffering––through the terms of their own work, in places and contexts that may at first appear quite distant from the villages of Zimbabwe and townships of South Africa that feature in Reynolds’ ethnographies. The Ways We Stretch Toward One Another is about anthropologists stretching in thought and practice toward one another, between generations, toward the people encountered in the field, through worlds entered and departed, and how, in turn, these worlds lean into our own. At the core of each essay is a question about how we learn, how we pass lessons on, how we assume the mantle of anthropology for understanding the contemporary world––something that often requires folding intellectual friendships into the equipment of our practice. The Ways We Stretch Toward One Another demonstrates how a master anthropologist has come to shape the priorities of others, in terms that are both creative and aware.
, Associate Professor of Anthropology and Director of the Center for Society, Health, and Medicine at New York University––Shanghai
Contributors: Thomas Cousins, Stefanos Geroulanos, Todd Meyers, Pamela Reynolds, Fiona Ross, and Vaibhav Saria; and a Foreword by Francis B. Nyamnjoh
AFRICAN INTELLECTUALS Intergenerational Conversations Series
The WAYS WE STRETCH TOWARD ONE ANOTHER: Thoughts on Anthropology through the Work of Pamela Reynolds
EDITEDBY Todd Meyers
The Ways We Stretch Toward One Another Thoughts on Anthropology through the Work of Pamela ReynoldsEdited by Todd Meyers L a ng a a R esea rch & P u blishing CIG Mankon, Bamenda
Publisher:LangaaRPCIG Langaa Research & Publishing Common Initiative Group P.O. Box 902 Mankon Bamenda North West Region Cameroon Langaagrp@gmail.comwww.langaa-rpcig.net Distributed in and outside N. America by African Books Collective orders@africanbookscollective.com www.africanbookscollective.com
ISBN-10: 9956-762-71-7
ISBN-13: 978-9956-762-71-2
©Todd Meyers & Contributors2017 All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, mechanical or electronic, including photocopying and recording, or be stored in any information storage or retrieval system, without written permission from the publisher
Table of Contents Foreword……………………………………………….vFrancis B. Nyamnjoh Editor’s Note…….……………………...……….……. xiiiTodd Meyers 1. Index Cards, Injunctions and Independence…………………………………………. 1 Thoughts on relationship Fiona C. Ross 2. Cuts of Various Depths………………………….…. 27 A few scenes of learning from Pamela ReynoldsTodd Meyers 3. Anthropology and the Development of Conscience……………………….…. 37Reflections on the work of Pamela Reynolds Thomas Cousins 4. The Ungovernable and Dangerous……...………… 71 Children, sexuality, and anthropologyVaibhav Saria 5. An Anthropology of Forms that Speak……………. 95 Justice, Knowledge, Technique Stefanos Geroulanos
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6. The Anthropologist Fashions and Refashions, is Fashioned and Refashioned…………. 105 Todd Meyers talks with Pamela Reynolds 7. Afterword…………………………………………….125 Pamela Reynolds Pamela Reynolds: CV & Selected Bibliography…………………………...127 Contributors…….…………………..…………....…….135
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Foreword Francis B. Nyamnjoh In February 2015, Langaa organised a week-long workshop in Buea on the theme of “Compulsory Retirement and the Future of Anthropology in Africa: An Intergenerational Conversation in Intellectual History.” Thirty-two people (15 from Cameroon and 17 from other countries in Africa and beyond) participated in the workshop. Pamela Reynolds, whose work the current volume engages, was one of the international participants. The Wenner Gren Foundation provided some financial support for the workshop. In the presentations, discussion and deliberations that ensued, participants scrutinised the importance of context in understanding the retirement of anthropologists in universities across the African continent. They drew on their personal experiences and on the regulations and practices in their various university institutions and countries to address such questions as the following: How does the retirement of anthropologists differ in different contexts? What are the reasons for retirement? What are the effects of retirement? What are the different ends of retirement? What does it really mean to be retired? What is the difference between being retired by a university and a personal decision to retire? Here, some felt strongly that there is no retirement as such beyond compulsory retirement. In Cameroon for example,
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nobody retires as such, as compulsorily retired professors from state universities are re-employed on a contractual basis by many of the proliferating private universities. In some instances, those on retirement continue supervising students at senior level. In such instances, compulsory retirement becomes a form of circulation of resources. Whatever the prevailing situation in a given country or institutional framework, participants stressed the need to encourage anthropologists to be very professional in order not to be taken hostage by retirement. Is it useful to talk in terms of peaceful and painful retirements? Granted that, in general, universities across the continent do not seem to have planned for retirement through robust and sustained capacity building (planning and training progressively), how could those faced with compulsory retirement devise ways of outsmarting institutions who want to retire them? Given that retirement from university life is not always a curse, how does one cultivate positive views of such retirement through balancing, for instance, social and academic interests, time management, and the capacity to develop new forms of continued relevance? The workshop participants partook in robust debates on the history, currency and future of anthropology in Africa as an intellectual discipline and practice, based on retirement, transmission, rupture and continuity. Questions raised and pursued included the following:
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