268 Pages
English

Values and Development in Southern Africa

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Development has been on Africa's agenda for a long time but progress has been both varied and limited, partly due to the diverse levels of the discussions on the challenges and the interventions for tackling them. Africa's greatest challenge is the uneven development within and between its countries, and the pressing issues of extreme poverty in southern Africa, and the continent as a whole. Poverty causes its victims to suffer social exclusion and political repression. In addition, societies that experience poverty are also mostly under continuous threat of ecological disasters and diseases. All poor people are therefore plagued by loss of freedom and dignity, and are often unable to participate effectively in the political, economic, legal and social processes of their countries.
This book focuses on the social and cultural dimensions of development dynamics and, in particular, the role of values in shaping development. Values are at the core of the hopes and aspirations of individuals, communities and societies. The book therefore explains the values that motivate and inform African communities and societies, with a view to facilitating a dialogue about sustainable development in Africa among academics, intellectuals, policy and, and the communities. It also investigates the social and cultural dynamics of development in Africa, as a better alternative to earlier studies that blame African culture for poverty and exclude the people of Africa in their definition of developments in the continent. The significance of this book lies in its provision of a theoretical argument, from empirical perspective, on the role of values in the development of Africa; an argument that is capable of facilitating a dialogue about African development, which obviously proves more useful than either the imposition of a technical process or the announcement of a normative framework.

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Published 28 March 2013
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EAN13 9782869785670
Language English
Document size 3 MB

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Values and Development in Southern Africa
This book is a product of CODESRIA’s Comparative Research Network
Values and Development in Southern Africa
Edited by Hans Müller Pinkie Mekgwe Marvellous Mhloyi
Council for the Development of Social Science Research in Africa  DAKAR
©CODESRIA 2013 Council for the Development of Social Science Research in Africa Avenue Cheikh Anta Diop, Angle Canal IV BP 3304 Dakar, 18524, Senegal Website: www.codesria.org
ISBN: 978-2-86978-554-0
All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage or retrieval system without prior permission from CODESRIA.
Typesetting: Daouda Thiam Cover Design: Ibrahima Fofana
Distributed in Africa by CODESRIA Distributed elsewhere by African Books Collective, Oxford, UK Website: www.africanbookscollective.com
The Council for the Development of Social Science Research in Africa (CODESRIA) is an independent organisation whose principal objectives are to facilitate research, promote research-based publishing and create multiple forums geared towards the exchange of views and information among African researchers. All these are aimed at reducing the fragmentation of research in the continent through the creation of thematic research networks that cut across linguistic and regional boundaries.
CODESRIA publishesAfrica Development, the longest standing Africa based social science journal;Afrika Zamani, a journal of history; theAfrican Sociological Review; theAfrican Journal of International Affairs;Africa Review of Books and theJournal of Higher Education in Africa. The Council also co-publishes theAfrica Media Review;Identity, Culture and Politics: An Afro-Asian Dialogue;The African Anthropologistand theAfro-Arab Selections for Social Sciences. The results of its research and other activities are also disseminated through its Working Paper Series, Green Book Series, Monograph Series, Book Series, Policy Briefs and the CODESRIA Bulletin. Select CODESRIA publications are also accessible online at www.codesria.org.
CODESRIA would like to express its gratitude to the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (SIDA/SAREC), the International Develop-ment Research Centre (IDRC), the Ford Foundation, the MacArthur Foundation, the Carnegie Corporation, the Norwegian Agency for Development Coopera-tion (NORAD), the Danish Agency for International Development (DANIDA), the French Ministry of Cooperation, the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), the Netherlands Ministry of Foreign Affairs, the Rockefeller Foundation, FINIDA, the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA), the Open Society Foundations (OSFs), TrustAfrica, UN/UNICEF, the African Capacity Building Foundation (ACBF) and the Government of Senegal for supporting its research, training and publication programmes.
Contents
Contributors ....................................................................................................vii Preface ..............................................................................................................ix
Section I Introducing the Issues 1.Introduction ................................................................................................ 3 Hans Müller, Pinkie Mekgwe and Marvellous Mhloyi
2.Background, Problem and Methodology .......................................... 17 Hans Müller, Hennie Kotzé and Stefanie Schulein
Section II Theoretical Reflections
3.Cultural values and Development in Theory and Practice .......................................................................................... 47 Hans Müller (with Tania van Heerden)
4. Cosmology, Power, Human Relationships and Human Qualities ................................................................................. 87 Hans Müller (with Tania van Heerden)
Section III Exploratory Empirical Investigations
5.......... 135 Linking Values and Development: An Empirical Analysis Hennie Kotzé and Stefanie Schulein
6.Values, Development and Demography .......................................... 159 Marvellous Mhloyi, Noah Taruberekera and Musonda Lemba
7.Human Values, African Values, Southern African Values? On Work ............................................................................................. 179 Hans Müller (with Tania van Heerden)
8. Conclusion ............................................................................................. 225 Hans Müller, Pinkie Mekgwe and Marvellous Mhloyi
Appendix: Country Reports .........................................................................231 References ......................................................................................................237
Contributors
Hennie Kotzé: Political Science, Centre for International and Comparative Politics, Dean of Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
Stefanie Schulein: Political Science, Researcher, Centre for International and Comparative Politics, Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
Musonda LembaSocial Development Studies,: Demography, Department of University of Zambia, Zambia.
Pinkie Mekgwe: English Literature, University of Botswana, formerly Programme Officer, CODESRIA, Dakar, Senegal.
Marvellous Mhloyi: Demography and Sociology, Chair of Department of Sociology, Centre for Population Studies, University of Zimbabwe, Zimbabwe.
Hans Müller: Social Theory and Decision-making, Centre for Knowledge Dynamics and Decision-making, University of Stellenbosch.
Tania van Heerden: Economics, Centre for Knowledge Dynamics and Decision-making, University of Stellenbosch.
Noah Taruberekera: Demography, Centre for Population Studies, University of Zimbabwe and Research Manager, Population Services International, Zimbabwe.
Preface
Any attempt to do comparative research with substantial empirical components, whether these are qualitative or quantitative or both, as it should be is fraught with obstacles. To do so without significant funding of the empirical work is to try the impossible. We wanted to do all of this across a minimum of six countries in Southern Africa. The focus on development and values gives our work intellectual direction and significance, as this is not something that has been done before. The support that we got from the South African National Research Foundation and the University of Stellenbosch, and facilitated by individuals like Robert Kriger and Johan Groenewald, allowed us to get together as a network and thrash out the project details from 2001 onwards. It was a significant idea and worth attempting. With the bestowing of a CODESRIA Comparative Research Network award in 2005, we began to believe that we would actually be able to make a dream come true. The support from CODESRIA and individuals like Ebrima Sall, Abdon Sofonou and, in the phase, Awa Diop, made a book possible. However, we are still some away from the real aim of the network in that we had to make do with empirical data generated by others and in terms of different research agendas. The eventual comments of the anonymous but most gracious and insightful reviewers have helped us reflect very critically on what we were able to achieve, given the circumstances. They have added significantly to the outcome. They have also reinforced our opinion that this is a project that has significance. It is unfinished in some ways, but we believe that a path has been laid out and concepts presented that could help build a road. The content of the respective chapters is the responsibility of the authors and the editors; and although we have taken due care to reference published and documented contributions to our thought processes, we were not able to do that for the contribution of the members of the network who did not contribute a chapter or section. They simply formed our thoughts and words in far-reaching ways. We are most grateful to these members and accept the blame of every misunderstood or wrong interpretation of their comments in workshops in Pretoria, Dakar and Stellenbosch. Thank you, Marcelino, Amos, Gaspar and Fred. It was an honour and a pleasure to work with you and our friendship is a cherished one.
Hans Müller Stellenbosch