310 Pages
English

Communication and Clinical Effectiveness in Rehabilitation E-Book

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Incorporating a patient-focused perspective on communication and health care, this new title for physical and occupational therapists and students provides practical strategies for effective communication with both colleagues and patients. Written in a straightforward, easy-to-understand style, it offers a multidisciplinary, evidence-based approach and an emphasis on reflective practice, making it a timely and useful resource for today's readers.
  • Discusses strategies for communicating with both colleagues and patients
  • Examines the evidence for the importance of effective communication in enhancing clinical effectiveness
  • Contains reflective exercises for self-awareness of personal communication skills and difficulties
  • Provides case studies that allow the reader to analyze a range of realistic communication problems
  • Includes research-based evidence throughout

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Published by
Published 11 November 2004
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EAN13 9780702038532
Language English
Document size 2 MB

Legal information: rental price per page 0.0181€. This information is given for information only in accordance with current legislation.

Communication and Clinical Effectiveness in Rehabilitation
Frances Reynolds, BSc DipPsychCouns PhD
Senior Lecturer in Psychology, Department of Health and Social Care, Brunel University, Isleworth, UK
Table of Contents
Cover image
Title page
Dedication
Copyright
Acknowledgements
Chapter 1: Introduction: taking a research-guided approach to communication
USE OF THE TERM ‘PATIENT’ IN THIS BOOK
WHAT IS ‘COMMUNICATION’?
COMMUNICATION SKILLS: WHY ARE THEY VITAL TOOLS FOR PHYSIOTHERAPISTS AND OCCUPATIONAL THERAPISTS?
WHY DO HEALTH PROFESSIONALS SOMETIMES COMMUNICATE POORLY WITH PATIENTS?
HOW MAY SKILFUL COMMUNICATION INFLUENCE PATIENTS?
COMMUNICATION AND CLINICAL EFFECTIVENESS
EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE AND CLINICAL EFFECTIVENESS
RESEARCH-GUIDED PRACTICE
FINDING RELEVANT RESEARCH EVIDENCE ABOUT PATIENTS’ NEEDS AND EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION
REVIEWING THE EVIDENCE
OTHER SOURCES OF EVIDENCE AND INFORMATION RELEVANT TO COMMUNICATION
OBSERVING AND PRACTISING INTERPERSONAL SKILLS
COMMUNICATING WITH COLLEAGUES
CONCLUSION
Chapter 2: Models of health, illness and rehabilitation
THE BIOMEDICAL MODEL OF HEALTH CARE
WHAT ARE HEALTH, DISEASE, ILLNESS AND DISABILITY?
THE BIOPSYCHOSOCIAL PERSPECTIVE
WHICH SOCIAL AND CULTURAL FACTORS HAVE CONTRIBUTED TO THE DEVELOPMENT OF A BIOPSYCHOSOCIAL MODEL OF HEALTH, ILLNESS AND HEALTH CARE?
THE SOCIAL MODEL OF DISABILITY
THE NEW ICF
PUTTING THE PATIENT FIRST: AN HOLISTIC. INTERPROFESSIONAL TEAM APPROACH
CONCLUSION
Chapter 3: Understanding patients’ experiences of ill-health and health care
UNDERSTANDING THE EXPERIENCE OF CHRONIC ILLNESS: SOME GENERAL ISSUES
UNDERSTANDING THE ILLNESS EXPERIENCE: ANALYSING A SPECIFIC CASE
UNDERSTANDING ILLNESS FROM A STRESS-COPING PERSPECTIVE
UNDERSTANDING ILLNESS AS A BIOGRAPHICAL DISRUPTION
TREATMENT AND HOSPITALISATION FROM THE PATIENT’S PERSPECTIVE
SOME PERSONAL AND CONTEXTUAL FACTORS WHICH INFLUENCE PEOPLE’S RESPONSES TO ILLNESS
PERSON VARIABLES
ILLNESS SYMPTOMATOLOGY
TREATMENT AVAILABILITY AND PERCEIVED EFFECTIVENESS
SOCIAL CONTEXT
CULTURAL FACTORS
ENVIRONMENTAL AND STRUCTURAL RESOURCES AND BARRIERS
THE ILLNESS EXPERIENCE: POSITIVE ASPECTS AMIDST ADVERSITY
CONCLUSION
Chapter 4: Patients’ communication needs in healthcare settings
RESEARCH INTO PATIENTS’ EXPRESSED NEEDS AND DISSATISFACTION DURING ENCOUNTERS WITH HEALTH PROFESSIONALS
AUTOBIOGRAPHIES OF INDIVIDUALS RECOUNTING ILLNESS AND TREATMENT EXPERIENCES
OBSERVATIONS OF HEALTH PROFESSIONALS DURING MORE AND LESS SUCCESSFUL CONSULTATIONS WITH PATIENTS
CONCLUSION
Chapter 5: Skilful communication and clinical effectiveness
ASSESSING BENEFICIAL HEALTH OUTCOMES OF PATIENT-CENTRED COMMUNICATION – WHY IS THIS A DIFFICULT TASK?
EXPLORING THE EFFECTS OF PATIENT-FOCUSED COMMUNICATION ON FUNCTIONING AND WELL-BEING: A CASE STUDY
WHAT DIFFERENCE DOES PATIENT-CENTRED COMMUNICATION MAKE TO PATIENTS’ HEALTH AND WELL-BEING?
FOCUS ON RESEARCH
HOW MAY PATIENT-CENTRED COMMUNICATIONS INFLUENCE HEALTH OUTCOMES?
Adherence to treatment/advice
CONCLUSION
Chapter 6: Working in partnership with patients
PARTNERSHIP APPROACHES
HOW CAN THERAPISTS ESTABLISH BETTER PARTNERSHIPS WITH CLIENTS?
PATIENT INFLUENCES ON PARTNERSHIP WORKING
COMMUNICATION BARRIERS: EFFECTS OF LANGUAGE, CULTURE AND HEARING IMPAIRMENT ON PARTNERSHIP WORKING
ADJUNCTIVE INFLUENCES ON PARTNERSHIP WORKING
CONCLUSION
Chapter 7: Providing support
RECOGNISING EMOTIONAL DISTRESS IN PATIENTS
FORMS OF SUPPORT
WHAT DOES SUPPORT OFFER PATIENTS? WHAT DIFFERENCE DOES IT
MAKE?
SUPPORTIVE COMMUNICATIONS: ADDRESSING THE PERSON RATHER THAN ‘A PATIENT’
SUPPORTIVE COMMUNICATIONS: THE PRACTICE OF EMPATHY
SUPPORTIVE COMMUNICATIONS: CONTAINMENT
CAN EMPATHY BE TAUGHT?
COGNITIVE BEHAVIOURAL APPROACHES
OTHER FORMS OF SUPPORT
BARRIERS TO OFFERING PATIENT-CENTRED SUPPORT
SUPPORT AND SELF-CARE FOR THERAPISTS
CONCLUSION
Chapter 8: Patient education and empowerment
WHAT FORMS OF INFORMATION AND EDUCATION DO PATIENTS VALUE?
WHAT FACTORS PREVENT PATIENTS FROM GAINING THE INFORMATION THAT WOULD EMPOWER GREATER CHOICE AND COPING STRATEGIES?
THE COMMUNICATION MATRIX
HELPING PATIENTS LEARN THROUGH MAXIMISING ATTENTION, COMPREHENSION, ACCEPTANCE AND RECALL
ENCOURAGING PATIENTS TO BECOME MORE PROACTIVE IN THEIR LEARNING AND SELF-MANAGEMENT
BEHAVIOURAL CHANGE AND SELF-EFFICACY ISSUES
ADDRESSING THE CONTEXT OF PATIENT EDUCATION
EVALUATING THE OUTCOMES OF PATIENT EDUCATION AND EMPOWERMENT PROGRAMMES
CONCLUSION
Chapter 9: Teamwork in the rehabilitation setting
DIFFERENCES BETWEEN ‘MULTIPROFESSIONAL’ AND ‘INTERPROFESSIONAL’ TEAMS
TASK AND MAINTENANCE PROCESSES IN GROUPS
GROUP NORMS
COMMUNICATION NETWORKS
DEFENSIVE COMMUNICATIONS IN GROUPS
LIMITED UNDERSTANDING OF EACH PROFESSION’S ROLES AND STEREOTYPING/PREJUDICE
GEOGRAPHICAL DISPERSAL AND OTHER ‘MUNDANE’ BARRIERS TO COMMUNICATION
LEADERSHIP STYLES
HIERARCHY
CLASH OF REHABILITATION OR TEAMWORK PHILOSOPHIES
FINANCIAL BARRIERS TO TEAMWORKING
SEPARATE ASSESSMENTS, TREATMENT PLANS AND WRITTEN RECORDS
EFFECTIVE TEAM-WORKING: POSSIBLE BENEFITS FOR PATIENTS
SOME STRATEGIES FOR ENHANCING INTERPROFESSIONAL TEAMWORK
CONCLUSION
Chapter 10: Conclusion
RETROSPECTIVE
FINAL COMMENTS
References
Index
Dedication
To Dad
For Elsevier:
Senior Commissioning Editor: Heidi Harrison
Development Editor: Robert Edwards
Project Manager: Gail Wright
Design Direction: George Ajayi
Copyright
© 2005, Elsevier Limited. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without either the prior permission of the publishers or a licence permitting restricted copying in the United Kingdom issued by the Copyright Licensing Agency, 90 Tottenham Court Road, London W1T 4LP. Permissions may be sought directly from Elsevier’s Health Sciences Rights Department in Philadelphia, USA: phone: (+1) 215 238 7869, fax: (+1) 215 238 2239, e-mail: healthpermissions@elsevier.com. You may also complete your request on-line via the Elsevier homepage (http://www.elsevier.com), by selecting ‘Customer Support’ and then ‘Obtaining Permissions’. First published 2005 Reprinted 2006
ISBN 0 7506 5665 4
British Library Cataloguing in Publication Data A catalogue record for this book is available from the British Library
Library of Congress Cataloguing in Publication Data A catalogue record for this book is available from the Library of Congress
Notice
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