Ethics in Community Mental Health Care: Commonplace Concerns

Ethics in Community Mental Health Care: Commonplace Concerns

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English

Description

Ethics in Community Mental Health Care: Commonplace Concerns examines everyday ethical issues that clinicians encounter as they go about their work caring for people who have severe and persistent mental disorders. Individuals (psychiatrists, social workers, case managers, nurses, psychologists, peer counselors, primary care physicians) who serve on the front line of community mental health clinical and social services find that they must deal, on a daily basis, with significant ethical dilemmas that involve personal, social, and policy matters: overstepping personal boundaries and coercive practices, dealing with violence in the home and in the workplace, breaching confidentiality, and ensuring the rights and welfare of vulnerable individuals.
This book prompts and provokes readers to recognize, to analyze, to reflect upon, and to respond to the range of commonplace ethical concerns that arise in community mental health care practice with persons who have mental disorders that may impede their ability to protect their own interests.

Subjects

Informations

Published by
Published 01 January 2002
Reads 8
EAN13 0306475588
License: All rights reserved
Language English

Legal information: rental price per page €. This information is given for information only in accordance with current legislation.

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Introduction
Patricia Backlar
CONTENTS
PARTI. COMMONPLACEENCOUNTERS WITHCONSUMER/PATIENTS
Chapter 1 Ethical Issues in Mental Health Services for Culturally Diverse Communities Harriet P. Lefley
Good practice involves a psychological component to cultural sensitivity that can enhance observational and therapeutic skills with individuals of all cultural backgrounds, including one's own.
Chapter 2 Ethical Dilemmas in Providing Supported Housing and Rehabilitation Services Mary Alice Brown and Dee Wirak
Three vignettes illustrate critical ethical dilemmas that clinicians in communitybased services are likely to encounter.
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3
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xii
PARTII. PERSONALBOUNDARIES
Chapter 3 Roles, Relationships, and Rules: Boundary Concerns
Patricia Backlar
CONTENTS
The manysided and diverse nature of today's community mental health support services may cause healthcare professionals to reconsider traditionally held views about their roles, about their relationship with their patients, and about their understanding of customary boundary rules.
Chapter 4 Responding to Boundary Conflicts in Community Settings David Pollack
A medical director's practical experience with boundary considerations relevant to a new range of ethical concerns in community practice.
PARTIII. VIOLENCE ANDMENTALDISORDERS
Chapter 5 At Home with Threats and Violence
Patricia Backlar
Little attention has been paid to the despair and fear of families—informal caregivers—with mentally ill relatives, whose lives may be fraught with intermittent tumult, threats of violence, and actual violence.
Chapter 6 At Work with Threats and Violence
Carl C. Bell, Morris A. Blount, Jr., and Tanya R. Anderson
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51
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CONTENTS
xiii
The issue of violence is a serious one for professionals who provide services in the community, but the personal safety of the clinician and how clinicians should respond to aggression is rarely discussed.
PARTIV. INVOLUNTARYINTERVENTIONS
Chapter 7 Involuntary Interventions in Dual Disorders Programs
Douglas L. Noordsy, Carolyn C. Mercer, and Robert E. Drake
A moral and clinical evaluation of involuntary interventions in the treatment of clients with dual disorders reveals thathow the involuntary intervention is approached is just as critical as whetheran involuntary intervention is used.
Chapter 8 Coercion in Mental Health Care
Virginia Aldige' Hiday, Marvin S. Swartz, Jeffrey W. Swanson, Randy Borum, and H. Ryan Wagner
An examination of whether coercion works as a check to self harm, and in preventing violence to others.
Chapter 9 Why are Severely Mentally Ill Persons in Jail and Prison?
David L. Cutler, Douglas Bigelow, Valerie Collins, Courtney Jackson, and Gary Field
The beginning of the 21st Century has been marked by the alarming phenomenon of droves of mentally ill people being sent to jail. Housing, lack of supports, and substance abuse, rather than criminal activity per se, appear to be the major factors driving migration into the criminal justice system.
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PARTV. PSYCHIATRICANTICIPATORYPLANNING
Chapter 10 "Can I PlanNowfor the Mental Treatment I Would Want If I Were in Crisis?" Oregon's Psychiatric Advance Directive Patricia Backlar, Bentson H. McFarland, and Jo Mahler
CONTENTS
The psychiatric advance directive (PAD) was conceived as a selfadvocacy tool for consumers to use in psychiatric emergencies. However, the PAD's most tangible significance may be as an instrument that assists clinicians to enhance patients' continuity of treatment and consequently improve the opportunity to enhance consumer rehabilitation and recovery.
Chapter 11 Psychiatric Health Care Proxies in Massachusetts: Much To Do About Nothing, So Far Jeffrey Geller
Health care proxies are beginning to get more attention in psychiatric settings, but are these proxies useful when applied to psychiatric decisions?
PARTVI. RESEARCHETHICS
Chapter 12 Ethics in Neurobiological Research: One Consumer/Provider's Perspective Frederick J. Frese, III
Persons with mental illness, individually and collectively, should be given, as a matter of course, maximal input in all aspects of research done where consumer/patients are involved.
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CONTENTS
PARTVII. CONFLICTINGINTERESTS
Chapter 13 Pharmaceutical Industry Support of Psychiatric Research and Education: Ethical Issues and Proposed Remedies Charles R. Goldman and David L. Cutler An examination of proposed remedies to ethical concerns raised by increased pharmaceutical industry influence on psychiatric research and education.
Index
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