163 Pages
English
Gain access to the library to view online
Learn more

The Visual Dictionary of the Human Body

-

Gain access to the library to view online
Learn more
163 Pages
English

Description

Attractive, entertaining, and educational: the Visual Dictionary of the Human Body is an indispensable family reference, and a great tool to acquire vocabulary and discover the complexity of the human body.

Subjects

Informations

Published by
Published 05 September 2012
Reads 0
EAN13 9782764409008
Language English
Document size 60 MB

Legal information: rental price per page 0.0037€. This information is given for information only in accordance with current legislation.

Exrait

frontal muscle M sculo frontal Large, unpaired muscleconnecting the upper part of the orbit andthe epicranial aponeurosis; it allowsthe skin of the forehead to crease and the eyebrows to lift.
VofItheSUALDEFINITIONS Human Body E N G L I S H S PA N I S H
orbicular muscle of mouth MF músculo orbicular de la boca Unpaired muscle having two bundles connecting the corners of the lips, allowing the mouth to open and close especially.
greater zygomatic muscle M músculo cigomático mayor Paired muscleconnecting the zygomatic bone to the angle of the mouth; it assists in smiling.
QA INTERNATIONAL
VISUALDEFINITIONS of the Human Body E N G L I S H S P A N I S H
The Visual Dictionary of the Human Bodywas created and produced by
QA International e 329, rue de la Commune Ouest, 3 étage Montréal (Québec) H2Y 2E1 Canada T: 514.499.3000 F: 514.499.3010
www.qa-international.com
© QA International, 2009. All rights reserved.
No part of this book may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage and retrieval sytem, without permission in writing by QA International.
ISBN 978-2-7644-0900-8
Printed and bound in China.
10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 14 13 12 11 10 9
Editor Caroline Fortin Editorial Director Martine Podesto Editor-in-Chief Anne Rouleau Graphic Designers Mélanie Giguère-Gilbert Josée Noiseux LayoutÉmilie Corriveau Pascal Goyette Danielle Quinty Illustrators Art Director: Sylvain Bélanger Danielle Bader Manuela Bertoni Jocelyn Gardner Mélanie Giguère-Gilbert Alain Lemire Raymond Martin Émilie McMahon Anouk Noël Programmer-analyst Éric Gagnon Project Managers Nathalie Fréchette Véronique Loranger Prepress Julien Brisebois François Hénault Karine Lévesque Patrick Mercure Proofreading Myriam Caron Belzile Claude Frappier Veronica Schami Scientific Advisor Dr. Éric Philippe, Ph. D.
This book is part of a larger encyclopedic project on health in general. About 300 specialists from America and Europe participated in the scientific validation of texts and illustrations produced for this project: Sylvie Louise Avon, D.M.D., M. Sc., CS (ODQ), FRCD(C), Faculty of Dentistry, Université Laval; Abdel-Rahmène Azzouzi, M.D., Ph. D., Urology Service, CHU d’Angers; Stéphane Barrette, M.D., hematologist-oncologist, CHU Sainte-Justine; Louise Beaulac-Baillargeon, B. Pharm., Ph. D., Faculty of Pharmacy, Université Laval; Khaled Benabed, hematologist, CHU de Caen; Mehdi Benkhadra, Department of Anesthesia, Le Bocage Hospital, Dijon; Céline Bergeron, M.D., FRCPC, MSC, pneumologist, Université de Montréal Hospital Center; Christina Blais, Dt. P., M. Sc., Department of Nutrition, Université de Montréal; Pierre Blondeau, Ophtalmology Service, CHU de Sherbrooke; Gilles Boire, M.D., M. Sc., Rhumatology Service, Université de Sherbrooke; Andrée Boucher, M.D., endocrinologist, Université de Montréal Hospital Center; Mickael Bouin, M.D., Ph. D., gastroenterologist, Université de Montréal Hospital Center; Guylain Boulay, Ph. D., Department of Pharmacology, Université de Sherbrooke; Sylvain Bourgoin, Ph. D., Department of Anatomy-Physiology, Université Laval; André Cantin, M.D., Faculty of Medicine, Université de Sherbrooke; Michel Cayouette, Ph. D., Research Unit on Cellular Neurobiology, Institut de recherches cliniques de Montréal; Fatiha Chandad, Ph. D., Faculty of Dentistry, Université Laval; Bernard Cortet, Department of Rhumatology, CHU de Lille; Olivier Dereure, M.D., Ph. D., Dermatology Service, Université de Montpellier I; Serge Dubé, M.D., F.R.C.S.C., general surgeon, Maisonneuve-Rosemont Hospital, Montréal; Jean-Jacques Dufour, M.D., Otorhinolaryngology Service, Université de Montréal Hospital Center and Jewish General Hospital; Louis-Gilles Durand, O.Q., Ph. D., Ing., Biomedical Engineering Laboratory, Institut de recherches cliniques de Montréal; Wael El Haggan, M.D., nephrologist, CHU de Caen; Martin Fortin, Department of Family Medicine, Université de Sherbrooke; Jean-Marc Frapier, cardiovascular surgeon, CHU de Montpellier; Catherine Fressinaud, M.D., Ph. D., neurologist, CHU d’Angers; Dominique Garrel, Department of Nutrition, Université de Montréal; Serge Gauthier, M.D., FRCPC, McGill Centre for Studies in Aging; Franck Geneviève, M.D., Hematology Laboratory, CHU d’Angers; Jérémie Gerard, Hematology Laboratory, CHU d’Angers; Philippe Geslin, Cardiology Service, CHU d’Angers; Marc Girard, M.D., CHU Sainte-Justine; Philippe Granier, Nuclear Medicine Service, Antoine Gayraud Hospital, Carcassonne; Daniel Grenier, Ph. D., Faculty of Dentistry, Université Laval; Pavel Hamet, M.D., Ph. D., FRCPC, FCAHS, Genic Medicine Service, Université de Montréal Hospital Center; Luc Hittinger, Federation of Cardiology, Henri Mondor Hospital, Créteil; Thierry Jeanfaivre, M.D., Department of Pneumology, CHU d’Angers; Francine Jolicoeur, Ph. D., Centre intégré du cancer du sein, Université de Montréal Hospital Center; Chantal Kohler, M.D., Ph. D., Department of Histology, Cytology and Embryology, Université Henri Poincaré, Nancy; Stéphane Labialle, Ph. D., Obstetrics Department, McGill University; Pierre Lalonde, M.D., psychiatrist, Université de Montréal; Bernard Lambert, M.D., gynecologist, Université de Montréal Hospital Center; Patrice Le Floch-Prigent, Laboratoire d’anatomie de l’UFR de Médecine, Paris; Tony Leroux, Ph. D., audiologist, Université de Montréal and Raymond-Dewar Institute; Gérard Lorette, Dermatology Service, CHU de Tours; Jean-Pierre Marie, M.D., Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Hôtel-Dieu de Paris; René Martin, Department of Family Medicine, Université de Sherbrooke; Marie-Anne Mayoux-Benhamou, M.D, Ph. D., Service of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Cochin Hospital, Paris; Hortensia Mircescu, M.D., Endocrinology Service, Université de Montréal Hospital Center; Michel Mondain, M.D., Ph. D., Université Montpellier I; Didier Mouginot, Ph.D., Faculty of Medicine, Université Laval; Georges Mourad, M.D., Nephrology and Graft, Lapeyronie Hospital, Montpellier; Nicole Normandin, Ph. D., School of Orthophony and Audiology, Université de Montréal; Luc L. Oligny, M. Sc, M.D., pathologist, CHU Sainte-Justine; Philippe Orcel, Secrétaire général de la Société française de rhumatologie; Farid Ouacel, orthopedic surgery and traumatology, CHU d’Angers; Pierre Pagé, M.D., cardiovascular surgeon, Sacré-Coeur Hospital and Montreal Heart Institute; Aleth Perdriger, M.D., Ph. D., Rennes Hospital; Daniel Picard, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Nuclear Medicine, Université de Montréal Hospital Center; Luc Picard, Diagnostic and Therapeutic Neuroradiology Service, CHU de Nancy; Claude Poirier, pneumologist, Université de Montréal Hospital Center; Jean-Pierre Raynauld, Ph. D., Department of Physiology, Université de Montréal; Eric Renard, M.D., Ph. D., Endocrine Diseases Service, CHU de Montpellier; Nathalie Renaud, O.D., optometrist; Jean-Paul Rocca, Ph. D., odontologist, CHU de Nice; Pierre Rochcongar, Biology and Sports Medicine Unity, CHU de Rennes; José Sahel, Hepato-Gastroenterology Service, La Conception Hospital, Marseille; Louis-Georges Ste-Marie, M.D., Bone Diseases Laboratory, Université de Montréal Hospital Center; Laurent Salez, Ph. D., immunologist, Scienscrib, Montréal; Thierry Six, gynecologist-obstetrician, CHU de Caen; Ann-Muriel Steff, Pharm. D., Ph. D., LAB Recherche inc.; Daniel Thomas, Heart Institute, Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital, Paris; Hervé Trillaud, M.D., Ph. D., Diagnostic and Therapeutic Imagery Service, CHU de Bordeaux; Guy Vallancien, Université Paris Descartes; Elvire Vaucher, Ph. D., School of Optometry, Université de Montréal; Monique Vincens, M.D., Ph. D., endocrinologist and pharmacologist, Université Paris VII; Catherine Vincent, M.D., hepatologist, Université de Montréal Hospital Center.
Introduction
The Visual Dictionary of the Human Bodyis a family atlas for exploration of the major systems of the human body. This book presents a collection of high-definition images of different parts of the body, linked to terms in several languages. Complementary texts (introductions and sidebars) offer additional information on the characteristics and functions of all systems shown.
Structure The book is divided into 14 major themes, each of which is preceded by a two-page spread with a short text introducing the context. Within each theme, titles and subtitles classify the illustrations into subcategories, which makes it easier to find them in the table of contents.The book also has a glossary of 45 common anatomical terms and an index containing all of the terms, titles, illustration titles and subtitles used in the book.
TITLE Titles are located at the top of the page, with the other languages below. If a title continues on more than one page it is grayed out on subsequent pages.
THEME The themes correspond to the systems and divisions of the human body. They are presented on each page in the edition’s main language.
DEFINITION It explains the inherent qualities, function or characteristics of the element depicted in the illustration.
ILLUSTRATION The extremely realistic illustrations contribute to the visual definition of the terms associated with them.
human cell F célulahumana Basic unit of the human body, whose size and shape vary depending on the functions that it performs.
structure of a cell F F estructurade la célula All human cells have a similar structure: they are formed of a nucleus surrounded by cytoplasm and encased in a membrane.
C E L L A N D T I S S U E S
L
cell nucleus M núcleocelular Central core of the cell containing genetic information in the form of DNA and guiding protein synthesis.
endoplasmic reticulum M retículoendoplásmico Cell structure consisting of a network of pockets surrounding the nucleus; it is involved in protein synthesis.
centriole M centríolo Cell structure playing a key role during mitosis.
vacuole F vacuola Spherical cavity in which water, waste and various substances required by the cell are stored.
mitochondrion F mitocondria Structure associated with cell breathing; it produces and stores energy in the cell.
cell membrane F membranacelular Bilayer of lipid molecules forming the outer surface of the cell.
lipids M lípidos Molecules containing fatty acids, making up the cell membrane.
cytoplasm M citoplasma Liquid substance forming the inside of the cell, around the nucleus, in which cellular organelles bathe.
ribosome M ribosoma Organelle, floating free or bound to the endoplasmic reticulum, producing proteins essential to the formation and functioning of the human body.
protein F proteína Organic compound formed of amino acids; in the cell membrane, proteins form channels allowing the exchange of substances with the outside environment.
Golgi apparatus M aparatode Golgi Cell structure consisting of a group of membrane sacs; it is involved in the transport and maturation of proteins in the cell.
microfilament M microfilamento Rod-shaped structure supporting the cell and giving it its shape.
pseudopod M pseudópodo Extension of the cytoplasm of certain cells, serving mainly in cell displacement.
microtubule M microtúbulo Cylindrical structure supporting the cell and allowing organelles and substances in the cell to move about.
The Life of Cells
Each human being is composed of more than 50 trillion cells. Hundreds of millions of them die every minute, and just as many are born through cellular division. Some, such as certain white blood cells, die after only a few hours, while others, such as neurons, may survive throughout a human being's life.
TERM Each term is included in the index, with reference to the pages on which it appears. All the terms in the book were carefully selected following analysis of recent, high-quality documentation.
GENDER INDICATION F: feminine M: masculine N: neutral The gender of each common noun is indicated for the languages in which such categories exist.
SIDEBAR Sidebars present unusual or surprising facts that complement the information in each section.
Contents
Cell and tissues human cell tissue mitosis DNA Morphology man woman Skeleton bones main bones skull vertebral column thoracic cage pelvis hand foot Muscles muscle main muscles head and neck thorax and abdomen upper limb lower limb Joints main joints cartilaginous joints synovial joints Nervous system structure of nervous system neuron nerve impulse nervous tissue central nervous system peripheral nervous system Cardiovascular system blood blood circulation blood vessels heart
6 8 10 12 13 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 30 31 32 33 34 36 38 40 41 42 44 46 48 49 50 56 58 59 60 60 61 67 72 74 76 77 82
Lymphatic system organs of the lymphatic system Digestive system organs of the digestive system mouth teeth digestive tract pancreas liver Respiratory system organs of the respiratory system upper respiratory tract lungs Urinary system organs of the urinary system urinary bladder kidney Reproductive system male genital organs female genital organs Sense organs sight hearing smell taste touch Endocrine system endocrine glands thyroid gland hypophysis suprarenal gland Glossary Index
84 86 88 90 91 92 94 97 98 100 102 103 105 108 110 111 112 114 116 118 122 124 128 130 132 134 138 140 141 142 143 144 145
8 10 12 13
human cell
tissue
mitosis
DNA
Cellandtissues
The human body is formed of hierarchically organized components (tissues, organs, and systems), of which the basic unit is the cell. Cells are the site of intense activity: they accumulate and transmit energy, make proteins that are essential to the body’s functioning, and constantly reproduce by cellular division. They also contain all of the genes belonging to each individual.
humancell F célulahumana Basic unit of the human body, whose size and shape vary depending on the functions that it performs.
structure of a cell F F estructurade la célula All human cells have a similar structure: they are formed of a nucleus surrounded by cytoplasm and encased in a membrane.
C E L L A N D T I S S U E S
8
cell nucleus M núcleocelular Central core of the cell containing genetic information in the form of DNA and guiding protein synthesis.
endoplasmic reticulum M retículoendoplásmico Cell structure consisting of a network of pockets surrounding the nucleus; it is involved in protein synthesis.
centriole M centríolo Cell structure playing a key role during mitosis.
vacuole F vacuola Spherical cavity in which water, waste and various substances required by the cell are stored.
mitochondrion F mitocondria Structure associated with cell breathing; it produces and stores energy in the cell.
cell membrane F membranacelular Bilayer of lipid molecules forming the outer surface of the cell.
lipids M lípidos Molecules containing fatty acids, making up the cell membrane.
cytoplasm M citoplasma Liquid substance forming the inside of the cell, around the nucleus, in which cellular organelles bathe.
ribosome M ribosoma Organelle, floating free or bound to the endoplasmic reticulum, producing proteins essential to the formation and functioning of the human body.
protein F proteína Organic compound formed of amino acids; in the cell membrane, proteins form channels allowing the exchange of substances with the outside environment.
Golgi apparatus M aparatode Golgi Cell structure consisting of a group of membrane sacs; it is involved in the transport and maturation of proteins in the cell.
microfilament M microfilamento Rod-shaped structure supporting the cell and giving it its shape.
pseudopod M pseudópodo Extension of the cytoplasm of certain cells, serving mainly in cell displacement.
microtubule M microtúbulo Cylindrical structure supporting the cell and allowing organelles and substances in the cell to move about.
The Life of Cells
Each human being is composed of more than 50 trillion cells. Hundreds of millions of them die every minute, and just as many are born through cellular division. Some, such as certain white blood cells, die after only a few hours, while others, such as neurons, may survive throughout a human being's life.