Hazardous Decisions. Hazardous Waste Siting in the UK, The Netherlands and Canada. Insitutions and Discourses.

Hazardous Decisions. Hazardous Waste Siting in the UK, The Netherlands and Canada. Insitutions and Discourses.

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English

Description

The location of hazardous waste facilities can be approached in dramatically different ways. This book describes various possible approaches in terms of the institutions involved and the arguments that are accepted. A study is reported of the approach to siting that is embedded in the law in three countries (the UK, the Netherlands and Canada), and the way this approach works out in practice. This study allows lessons to be drawn on the practice of hazardous waste siting in general.

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Published by
Published 01 January 1983
Reads 23
EAN13 030648059X
License: All rights reserved
Language English

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Table of contents
Foreword: of bullets and churches
Chapter 1: Hercules, Leviathan or Promotheus?
1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4
The age of ecology Democratic institutions and their alternatives The siting of hazardous waste facilities Outline of this book; research questions and structure
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1
2 9 17 27
Chapter 2: Knowledge, competition, or dialogue? Institutional33 variations and their relation to discourses on facility siting.
2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5
Discourses on environmental decisionmaking The managerial discourse on decisionmaking The pluralist discourse on decisionmaking The communitarian discourse on decisionmaking An agenda for the rest of this book
Chapter 3: Hazardous decisions. The problems of hazardous waste, institutional responses and the ideas underlying them
3.1
3.2
3.3
The arrival of hazardous waste problems 3.1.1 Introduction 3.1.2 Regulations concerning hazardous waste 3.1.3 The rest of this chapter The role of the market, experts and representatives 3.2.1 Introduction 3.2.2 Shifting discourses and institutional arrangements 3.2.3 Institutional developments since 1940 3.2.4Review The role of the courts 3.3.1 Introduction 3.3.2 The general place of the courts in government 3.3.3 Judicial activism? 3.3.4 The authority of the court
34 50 57 69 75
81
82 82 82 85 88 88 89 99 111 113 113 114 119 123
vi
3.4
3.5
3.3.5The issue of standing; what are the boundary rules? 3.3.6Quasijudicial procedures 3.3.7Costs of judicial and quasijudicial proceedings 3.3.8Some conclusions The role of the community 3.4.1Introduction 3.4.2Citizen participation in the pollution control system 3.4.3Citizen participation in land use planning 3.4.4Environmental assessment 3.4.5Some conclusions on citizen participation Conclusions
Chapter 4: The UK: Political control with the benefits of judicial authority?
4.1
4.2
4.3
4.4
Seal Sands: linked incinerator proposals 4.1.1Introduction 4.1.2Internal preparations, first contacts with authorities 4.1.3Official procedures 4.1.4The role of various institutions and discourses 4.1.5Some reflections Newport: an attempt to reject the logic of the planning system 4.2.1Introduction 4.2.2The development of the proposal: private initiative 4.2.3Official procedures start, decisions made 4.2.4Appeal and inquiry 4.2.5A new round and a new inquiry 4.2.6The role of the various institutions and discourses 4.2.7Review Rotherham: expertise from the local population 4.3.1Introduction 4.3.2Presentation of plans and broad rejection 4.3.3Inquiry 4.3.4The role of the various institutions and discourses 4.3.5the caseReview of Conclusions 4.4.1Introduction 4.4.2Cross case comparison 4.4.3Theoretical feedback
124 127 133 135 136 136 138 142 146 155 158
165
166 166 167 169 177 186 187 187 189 190 192 193 195 204 206 206 208 211 216 224 226 226 228 236
Table of contents
5.1
5.2
5.3
5.4
Chapter5: The Netherlands: participation through thecourt system
North Refinery: an example of the art of ‘gedogen’ 5.1.1Introduction 5.1.2Various proposals 5.1.3The art of gedogen 5.1.4The role of various institutions and discourse in this case Kaliwaal: how to take rational decisions and still end in court 5.2.1Introduction 5.2.2The various proposals made 5.2.3The role of various institutions and discourses 5.2.4Some reflections Dordrecht: national policy under stress 5.3.1Introduction 5.3.2Formal procedures 5.3.3The role of the various institutions and discourses Conclusions 5.4.1Introduction 5.4.2Cross case comparison 5.4.3Theoretical feedback
Chapter 6: Canada: Communitybased siting
6.1
6.2
6.3
Alberta: the development of an innovative approach to siting 6.1.1Introduction 6.1.2The genesis of invitational siting 6.1.3Invitational siting is redesigned and applied, twice 6.1.4Developmentsafter facility construction 6.1.5The role of the various institutions and discourses 6.1.6Review Manitoba: competition between rural and urban communities 6.2.1 Introduction 6.2.2 The development of a siting approach 6.2.3 Actual siting discussions 6.2.4 The role of various institutions 6.2.5 The role of discourse 6.2.6 Review of the case Deep River: Lowlevel radioactive wastes 6.3.1 Introduction 6.3.2 The solution to the lowlevel waste problem
vii
245
246 246 247 247 257 266 266 267 278 288 290 290 292 298 299 299 300 303
313
314 314 315 318 323 326 337 338 338 338 342 348 352 356 356 356 357
viii
6.4
6.3.3Implementation 6.3.4The role of various institutions and discourses 6.3.5the caseReview of Conclusions 6.4.1Introduction 6.4.2Cross case comparison 6.4.3Theoretical feedback
Chapter7: Comparison of case studies. Institutions, discourses, actors,and decision quality in the nine cases
7.1 7.2
7.3
7.4
7.5
7.6 7.7
Introduction The institutions involved 7.2.1Introduction: private sector versus other institutions 7.2.2Elected representatives 7.2.3The role of experts 7.2.4The role of the courts 7.2.5Therole of the community The actors involved 7.3.1Introduction 7.3.2The role of experts 7.3.3The role of market parties 7.3.4Politicians 7.3.5Voters 7.3.6Parties to a court case 7.3.7Members of the community The role of discourse 7.4.1Introduction 7.4.2The presence of various discourses 7.4.3The consequences of the use of discourses The quality of decisions 7.5.1Introduction 7.5.2Technical rationality 7.5.3The economic quality of the proposals 7.5.4The social quality of the decisions 7.5.5The political quality of the decisions 7.5.6Overall assessment of quality: patterns? The interestdiscourse divide Conclusions 7.7.1Introduction 7.7.2Conclusions within the theoretical framework
360 369 377 379 379 380 385
391
392 394 394 395 396 398 400 401 401 401 404 406 409 415 418 421 421 422 426 431 431 431 434 436 439 441 444 445 445 445
Table of contents
7.7.3 Some conclusions about the theoretical framework
Chapter 8: Summary and conclusions
8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5
Introduction The collective choice level: institutionalization The concrete choice level: siting debates Remarks about discourse analysis Implications for environmental decisionmaking 8.5.1Introduction 8.5.2The practice of hazardous waste siting 8.5.3 The practice of environmental decisionmaking
References
Appendix 1: List of interviewees
Appendix 2: Explanation of case selection
About the author
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447
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452 453 458 463 466 466 467 471
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