Wild Foresting
319 Pages
English

Wild Foresting

-

319 Pages
English

Description

This book will be advertised in Earth Island Journal, Sierra, The Tyee Prepub flyer offering 20% discount prior to off-press date Eblast sent to between 2,000 and 4,000 appropriate media targets Postcard mailing Review copies - between 100-150 review copies sent out to highly targeted list, including author requests, our "hit list" and appropriate media, including blogs Authors pitched as guest speakers at NSP-attended conferences, where appropriate. Author blog, website, contact info added to NSP site

· Duncan Taylor is the founder and director of Earth Day Canada (1990) – a Canada-wide celebration for environmental awareness. · Alan Drengson is one of the founders of the Ecoforestry Institute. · Both authors widely published with articles, journals, and books on the subject. · Book contains entries from a collection of experts: Arne Naess – recipient of The Star of St. Olaf, and the right livelihood award (sometimes called the alternative Nobel prize) Wes Jackson – a Pew Fellow and a MacArthur Fellow Merv Wilkinson – The Order of Canada Nancy Turner – The Order of Canada Wangari Maathai – the Nobel Prize Georg and Brenda Feuerstein – well-known in Yogi circles · Fills a niche for both adults and children growing up in technological societies about the importance of nature education.

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Published by
Published 01 March 2009
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EAN13 9781550924251
Language English
Document size 9 MB

Legal information: rental price per page €. This information is given for information only in accordance with current legislation.

Exrait

Advance praise for
Spectacularly encompassing, Drengson and Taylor’s collection of essays and scholarly thought on Wild Foresting is plainly, even painfully, as much about the wildness in ourselves as in our ravaged landscapes. This volume is indeed aid and nurturance for the wild mind and one of its best habitats, the wild forest. The reader hungry for a substantial vision of human harmony with forests (and by extension nature and most self-realized humanity) will not be disappointed. Here are 40 nutrient-packed, highly digestible morsels from leading forest ecologists, ethnobotanists, ecopsychologists, philosophers of the wild, practicing ecoforesters, advocates of children’s right to play outside, environmental visionaries, and Nobel prize winners. Drengson and Taylor strongly unite these works with the thread of Deep Ecology’s principles of honoring the diversity of life and the diversity of carefully reflected personal philosophy, two great forces that synergistically carry us beyond the decon-structive post-modern impasse of nihilism. This book is a forest feast for the mind, heart and hands. — Olin Eugene (Gene) Myers, Jr., Associate Professor, Huxley College of the Environment, Western Washington University
Industrial forestry treats our forests as a globalized commodity. With the col-lapse of the world’s financial industry, we have the opportunity to relearn the perils of an economy based on the fabricated value of currencies and com-modities.Wild Forestingexplores the contrary view, presenting our forests as real life, and forestry as real stewardship. This book reminds us that the knowledge exists to restore and sustain the ecological health of our forests, and to restore our relationship with the land. The next step is having the will to use that knowledge. — Mitch Friedman, Executive Director, Conservation Northwest
Cataloging in Publication Data: A catalog record for this publication is available from the National Library of Canada.
Copyright © 2009 by Alan Rike Drengson and Duncan MacDonald Taylor. All rights reserved.
Cover design by Diane McIntosh. Cover Image: Forest - istock/AVTG; Forest floor - istock/Ben Thomas
Printed in Canada.
New Society Publishers acknowledges the support of the Government of Canada through the Book Publishing Industry Development Program (BPIDP) for our pub-lishing activities.
Paperback ISBN: 978-0-86571-616-2
Inquiries regarding requests to reprint all or part ofWild addressed to New Society Publishers at the address below.
Forestingshould be
To order directly from the publishers, please call toll-free (North America) 1-800-567-6772, or order online at www.newsociety.com
Any other inquiries can be directed by mail to:
New Society Publishers P.O. Box 189, Gabriola Island, BC V0R 1X0, Canada (250) 247-9737
New Society Publishers’ mission is to publish books that contribute in fundamental ways to building an ecologically sustainable and just society, and to do so with the least possible impact on the environment, in a manner that models this vision. We are committed to doing this not just through education, but through action. This book is one step toward ending global deforestation and climate change. It is printed on Forest Stewardship Council-certified acid-free paper that is100% post-consumer recycled(100% old growth forest-free), processed chlorine free, and printed with vegetable-based, low-VOC inks, with covers produced using FSC-certified stock. Additionally, New Society purchases carbon offsets based on an annual audit, operat-ing with a carbon-neutral footprint. For further information, or to browse our full list of books and purchase securely, visit our website at: www.newsociety.com
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Dedication
E DEDICATE THIS BOOK TO ALL WILD FORESTERSand lifelong journeyers W and the many companions who share the wild forest communities wherever they might be. May you all find joy and indigenous wisdom in your home places. We are grateful for the help and support of Victoria Stevens in the prepa-ration of this book for publication. We are also grateful for the skillful copy editing done to the manuscript by Betsy Nuse. Special thanks to the Board Members of the Ecoforestry Institute and to the Editors of theEcoforestry Journal, Irv Penner and Davd Martin.
Contents
Foreword:Life On Our Planet Is In Trouble — What Will YOU Do? byGeorgandBrendaFeuerstein................................................................................................XI Introduction:Wild Foresting — A Vision Emerges by Alan Drengson and Duncan M. Taylor..................................................................................1 Poem:................................10nSumutAyCtbreecraloniRaae.d....................................................
Part I: Wild Forests and Perennial Wisdom Chapter 1: Values Deep in the Woods by Holmes Rolston III.................................................12 Chapter 2: The Place and the Story by Ralph Metzner............................................................17 Chapter 3: Forests and Sacred Groves by Sarah Laird .............................................................25 Chapter 4: Enrichment Forestry at Windhorse Farm by Jim Drescher ..................................31 Chapter 5: Ecoforestry — Doing the Right Things by Ray Travers ........................................41
Part II: Wild Forests, Trees and Diversity of Values Chapter 6: Ecological Principles for Responsible Forest Use by Alan Wittbecker .................44 Chapter 7: A Tree is a Quintessential Plant by Chris Maser....................................................52 Chapter 8: Salmon Nutrients, Nitrogen Isotopes and Coastal Forests by Tom Reimchen ....63 Chapter 9: Life with Carnivores in the Great Bear Rainforest — Notes from an Autumn Diary by Chris Genovali.........................................................................................................67 Chapter 10: Why Preserve Wild Forests? by George Wuerthner .............................................72 Chapter 11: Buddhism and Global Warming by Bill Devall ...................................................77
Part III: Case Studies Here and There Chapter 12: Lessons from the Old Growth — Merv Wilkinson and Wildwood Forest byJayRastogi..........................................................................................................................82
vii
viii Wild Foresting
Chapter 13: Renewing our Forest Culture — The Art and Practice of Natural Forests by Iliff Simey...........................................................................................................................87 Chapter 14: Restoring a Forest — A Remedy for Our Ills by Nitya Harris ............................94 Chapter 15: The Vision of Trees For Life by Alan Watson Featherstone ................................97 Chapter 16: Learning from Trees by Wangari Maathai..........................................................102 Chapter 17: Gaviotas — Lessons from a Global Classroom by Doug Skeates .....................105 Chapter 18: A Letter from Victoria by Brenda R. Beckwith ..................................................108 Chapter 19: The Future of Ecoforestry in Western Australia by Robert Hay .......................111 Chapter 20: Eco Tipping Points — How a Vicious Cycle Can Become Virtuous by Amanda Suutari and Gerald Marten..............................................................................117
Part IV: Indigenous Knowledge, Meeting Human and Wild Forest Needs Chapter 21: A First Nations Perspective on Ecosystem Management by Richard Atleo......126 Chapter 22: The Culture of Forests — Haida Traditional Knowledge and Forestry st in the 21 Century by Nancy J. Turner and Barbara Wilson (Kii’iljuus) .........................130 Chapter 23: Plant Teachers as a Source of Healing in the Peruvian Amazon byGonzaloBritoandClaireSieber.....................................................................................138 Chapter 24: Tree Meditation Meets Shamanism by Alan Drengson .....................................145 Chapter 25: Wild Humans by Davd Martin ...........................................................................151 Poem:KingleyValebyCarolinaRead.....................................................................................155
Part V: Wild Foresting, Healthy Children and Lifelong Learning Chapter 26: Nowadays We Idolize Nature — or Fear It by Richard Louv............................158 Chapter 27: The Powerful Link Between Conserving Land and Preserving Health by Howard Frumkin and Richard Louv..............................................................................161 Chapter 28: Creating a New Land Movement with Children by Peter Forbes.....................165 Chapter 29: Fairies, Forests and Childhood Education by Briony Penn ..............................172 Chapter 30: Beyond Ecophobia by David Sobel ....................................................................176 Chapter 31: The Longest Journey and Role of an Enlightened Witness by Alice Miller .....181 Chapter 32: Access to Free Nature by Arne Naess ..................................................................186 Chapter 33: Ecointelligence and Hope by Norah Trace .........................................................188 Chapter 34: Students Becoming Teachers through Place-Based Education byAlanDrengson.................................................................................................................192
Part VI: Wild Forests and the Fate of the World Chapter 35: Earth’s Greatest Crisis by Guy Dauncey .............................................................196 Chapter 36: The Future of British Columbia Forests Requires Resilience Management by Richard J. Hebda..............................................................................................................202 Chapter 37: Aboriginal Forests, Innu Culture and New Sustainable Economics by Tom Green .......................................................................................................................210 Chapter 38: Creating Institutions of Care — The Case for Democratic Forest Trusts byGusdiZerega....................................................................................................................220
contents ix
Chapter 39: Transforming Ourselves, Renewing the Earth by Duncan M. Taylor and Graeme M. Taylor .....................................................................230 Chapter 40: Shifting Direction to Local Interdependence by Helena Norberg-Hodge...................................................................................................243
Afterword:Where We Are Going by Wes Jackson .....................................................................257 Endnotes and References.............................................................63..2............................................. Appendix 1:Industrial and Ecological Approaches...................................................................281 Appendix 2:...........................287Resources for Supporting and Learning about Wild Foresting Index.............................................................................................................................192................ About the Contributors....01.3.........................................................................................................