Ways of Seeing, Ways of Speaking

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The essays in Ways of Seeing, Ways of Speaking: The Integration of Rhetoric and Vision in Constructing the Real explore the intersections among image, word, and visual habits in shaping realities and subjectivities.

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Published 11 October 2007
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EAN13 9781602350342
Language English
Document size 5 MB

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Visual Rhetoric Series Editor, Marguerite Helmers
V R Series Editor, Marguerite Helmers
Te Visual Retoric series publises work by scolars in a wide variety of disciplines, including art teory, antropology, reto-ric, cultural studies, psycology, and media studies.
Oter Books in te Series Writing the Visual: A Practical Guide for Teachers of Composition and Communication,edited by Carol David and Anne R. Ricards (2007)
Ways of Seeing, Ways of Speaking
he Integration of Retoric and Vision in Constructing te Real
Edited by Kristie S. Fleckenstein Sue Hum Linda T. Calendrillo
Parlor Press West Lafayette, Indiana www.parlorpress.com
Parlor Press LLC, West Lafayette, Indiana 47906
© 2007 by Parlor Press All rigts reserved. Printed in te United States of America.
S A N: 2 5 4 - 8 8 7 9
Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data
Ways of seeing, ways of speaking : te integration of retoric and vision in constructing te real / edited by Kristie S. Fleckenstein, Sue Hum, Linda T. Calendrillo.  p. cm. -- (Visual retoric)  Includes bibliograpical references and index.  ISBN 978-1-60235-032-8 (pbk. : alk. paper) -- ISBN 978-1-60235-033-5 (ardcover : alk. paper) -- ISBN 978-1-60235-034-2 (adobe ebook) 1. Visual communication. 2. Written communication. I. Fleckenstein, Kristie S. II. Hum, Sue. III. Calendrillo, Linda T.  P93.5.W397 2007  302.2--dc22  2007041905
Cover image © 2007 by Angel Herrero de Frutos. Used by permission. Cover design by David Blakesley. Printed on acid-free paper.
Parlor Press, LLC is an independent publiser of scolarly and trade titles in print and multimedia formats. Tis book is available in paper, clot and Adobe eBook formats from Parlor Press on te World Wide Web at ttp://www.parlorpress.com or troug online and brick-and-mortar bookstores. For submission information or to find out about Parlor Press publications, write to Parlor Press, 816 Robinson St., West Lafayette, Indiana, 47906, or e-mail editor@parlorpress.com.
Contents
Illustrations Acknowledgments 1 Testifying: Seeing and Saying in World Making Kristie S. Fleckenstein
Part I: Emergence 2 Hermeneutics and te New Imaging Don Ihde 3 Darwin’s Diagram: Scientific Visions and Scientific Visuals Alan Gross
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Part II: Appropriation81 4 body pixel cild / space time macine83 Anne Frances Wysocki 5 Te Racialized Gaze: Autenticity and Universality in Disney’sMulan107 Sue Hum 6 Making Meaning in “Scool Science”: Te Role of Image and Writing in te (Multimodal) Production of “Scientificness”131 Gunther Kress
Part III: Resistance153 7 Wat Do Pictures Want (of Women)? Women and te Visual in te Age of Biocybernetics155 Catherine L. Hobbs
viContents 8 Far Encounters: Looking Desire Mieke Bal 9 Blood, Visuality, and te New Multiculturalism David Palumbo-Liu
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Conclusion: Interinanimation225 10 Te Cyborg’s Hand: Care or Control? Interview wit Trin T. Min-a227 Valentina Vitali Index243 Contributors253
Illustrations
Chapter 1 Fig. 1. Vico’s Frontispiece, Giambattista Vico.
Chapter 2 Fig. 1. Camera obscura by Atanasius Kircer. Fig. 2. A Knowledge Macine. Fig. 3. Spectroscope. Fig. 4. Data/Image Reversibility. Fig. 5. X-Ray Emission. Fig. 6. Crab Nebula. Fig. 7. Imaged Algoritmic Data. Fig. 8. Computer Modeled Simulation.
Chapter 3 Fig. 1. Inequality of te solar apsides. Fig. 2. Retrograde motion of Jupiter. Fig. 3. Law of uniform accelerated motion. Fig. 4. Table of te simple substances. Fig. 5. Uplifted square masses. Fig. 6. Dislocated square masses. Fig. 7. Overtrown crustal masses. Fig. 8. Peasant’s wing. Fig. 9. Diagram of Divergence of Taxa. Fig. 10. Tree of Life. Fig. 11. Fis and bird lineage. Fig. 12. Diversity Diagram. Fig. 13. Descent troug natural selection. Fig. 14. Descent in absence of natural selection. Fig. 15. Evolutionary distance as a consequence of divergence. Fig. 16. Extinction.
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55 56 57 58 60 61 61 63 64 68 69 69 70 71 72 72
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Illustrations
73 Fig. 17. Germ-track ofRhabditis nigrovenosa. 74 Fig. 18. E. B. Wilson’s view of Weismann’s teory of ineritance. Fig. 19. J. Maynard Smit’s view of te central 74 dogma of molecular genetics.
Chapter 4 Fig. 1. Single-point linear perspective. Fig. 2: Te Lacanian field of vision.
Chapter 6 Fig. 1. First Student Example. Fig. 2. Second Student Example.
Chapter 7 Fig. 1. DNA strand. Fig. 2. Dinosaur fromJurassic Park. Fig. 3. Damien Hurst. Fig. 4. Dolly. Fig. 5. Joan Truckenbrod, “Tresolding.” Fig. 6. Gunter von Hagens. Bodyworlds Exibit. Fig. 7. Te Dream of Perfectability.
Chapter 9 Fig. 1. Aerial view of crime scene. Fig. 2. Hero figure. Fig. 3. McCaleb’s ceck. Fig. 4. First Meeting. Fig. 5. McCaleb sooting. Fig. 6. Buddy Noone. Fig. 7. Buddy’s deat. Fig. 8. View of Boat.
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Acknowledgments
Tis project began in 2001 wit a kernel of an idea and slowly grew to tis collection of essays. Trougout tat long evolution, we ave been supported by generous institutions and colleagues. Kristie S. Fleckenstein tanks Ball State University for an internal grant to defray te costs of permissions. Se also tanks Florida State University’s Department of Englis for similar support. Important to tis project were student interns Liza Cunnington, wo organized and began te process of soliciting permissions for te many images in te collection; Kyle Ford, wo carried on er work by learning more about fair use laws tan e wanted; and Micael Vermilyer, wo juggled permissions, images, and capters. In addition, se tanks Carmen Siering for er careful readings of and responses to te introduction. Finally, se tanks Jamie Miles for is expert preparation of te im-ages tat appear in tis collection. Sue Hum tanks er colleagues Bernadette Andrea, Elissa Foster, Nancy Myers, Mona Narain, and Carlos Salinas for teir patience and wisdom in elping midwife tis project to its birt. Teir individual expertise contributed to te interdisciplinary approaces of tis col-lection. Particularly crucial were te painstaking efforts of Laura Ellis and Lee Lundquist, wo proofread te entire manuscript carefully and exaustively. Linda T. Calendrillo tanks Valdosta State University for support-ing tis project wit a Faculty Researc Grant to elp wit expenses. Se also tanks Linda Holloway in te Dean of Arts and Sciences of-fice for er generous elp in keeping te work on track for tis book. Finally, se tanks Jon Z. Guzlowski for is prodigious proofreading skills, wic e provides so tanklessly. Lastly, toug certainly not least in importance, te editors tank David Blakesley for seeing te potential in tis project, Marguerite Helmers for er careful guidance and detailed response, and Paul
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