Called To Be God
402 Pages
English

Called To Be God's People, Abridged Edition

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402 Pages
English

Description

Called to Be God's People is an introduction to the Old Testament designed for those who wish to have a comprehensive guide to the contents, theology, and important passages of the Old Testament. Written from a Lutheran perspective, this book is especially designed for those within that tradition and others who seek a guide to the canonical books of the Old Testament that consciously presents the Scriptures' message of Law and Gospel as well as the traditional Christian messianic understanding of Moses and the Prophets that points to Jesus as the fulfillment of God's promises to Israel.
This book is an ideal condensed handbook for university students and other Christian adults who seek to expand their knowledge of the background, content, and message of the Old Testament and its importance for Christian faith and life. It introduces important background information on each book of the Old Testament along with a general discussion of contents and theology. Included are illustrations, maps, tables, charts and sidebars. A concluding chapter on the centuries between the Old and New Testaments overlaps with a similar treatment contained in the New Testament volume in this series, Called by the Gospel, allowing for a smooth transition to the study of the rest of the Christian Scriptures.

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Published 01 June 2015
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EAN13 9781725249844
Language English
Document size 4 MB

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Exrait

Called by the Gospel
Called By The Gospel Introductions to Christian History and Thought From a Distinctly Lutheran Perspective Volume 1 Called to Be God’s People: An Introduction to the Old Testament Andrew E. Steinmann, editor Called to Be God’s People, Abridged Edition: An Introduction to the Old TestamentMichael Eschelbach, Editor Volume 2 Called by the Gospel: An Introduction to the New Testament Michael P. Middendorf and Mark Schuler Volume 3 Called to Believe, Teach and Confess: An Introduction to Doctrinal Theology Stephen P. Mueller, editor Called to Believe (Abridged Edition)Stephen P. Mueller, editor
Called To Be God’s People Abridged Edition An Introduction to the Old Testament Andrew E. Steinmann Michael Eschelbach Curtis Giese Paul Puffe
W I P F&S T O C KO r e g o nEu g e n e ,
Table of Contents Foreword..................................................................................................... viiAbbreviations for Books of the Bible .......................................................... ixSection 1: Introduction 1 Reading and Understanding the Bible........................................................ 12 Introducing the Old Testament ................................................................ 13Section 2: The Pentateuch 3 Introduction to the Pentateuch ................................................................. 474 Genesis..................................................................................................... 575 Exodus ..................................................................................................... 716 Leviticus .................................................................................................. 877 Numbers................................................................................................... 998 Deuteronomy ......................................................................................... 109Section 3: The Historical Books 9 Introduction to the Historical Books ...................................................... 12310 Joshua .................................................................................................. 13111 The Period of the Judges: Judges and Ruth ......................................... 13712 Samuel ................................................................................................. 14913 Kings.................................................................................................... 15514 Chronicles ............................................................................................ 16315 Life Under Persian Rule: Ezra, Nehemiah, Esther ............................... 175Section 4: Poetry and Wisdom 16 Introduction to Hebrew Poetry and Biblical Wisdom .......................... 19917 Job........................................................................................................ 21118 Psalms .................................................................................................. 21919 Proverbs ............................................................................................... 22720 Ecclesiastes .......................................................................................... 23921 Song of Songs ...................................................................................... 247
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Section 5: The Prophets 22 Introduction to the Prophets................................................................. 25523 Two HardtoDate Prophecies: Obadiah and Joel................................ 26524 Prophecy to Israel in the Eighth Century: Jonah, Amos and Hosea..... 27125 Prophecy to Judah in the Eighth Century: Micah and Isaiah ............... 28326 Prophecy to Judah in the Seventh Century: Nahum, Habakkuk, Zephaniah .......................................................... 30327 Prophecy of the Fall of Judah and the Exile: Jeremiah, Lamentations, Ezekiel and Daniel ..................................... 31528 Prophecy After the Exile: Haggai, Zechariah and Malachi.................. 357Section 6: Beyond the Old Testament 29 Between the Testaments ...................................................................... 371
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Foreword
For Christians the study of the Old Testament is not simply a historical ex ercise or a prelude to the study of the New Testament. Instead, it is partand parcel of the entire message of God about the redemption of sinful humans through the promised Messiah, a promise fulfilled in Christ Jesus. The Old Tes tament anticipates the New, and without it the New Testament cannot be fully understood. This textbook was written by authors who “accept without reservation…the Scriptures of the Old and the New Testament as the written Word of God and the only rule and norm of faith and of practice…” and who also accept “…all the Symbolical Books of the Evangelical Lutheran Church as a true and unadul 1 terated statement and exposition of the Word of God.” Therefore, readers will find a distinctively Luthearn approach to understanding the Old Testament in these pages: the proper distinction of Law and Gospel, the centrality of Christ in the interpretation of Scripture and the acknowledgement that God works through the Means of Grace to apply the salvation won by Jesus to fallen, sinful hu mans—among many other Lutheran distinctives. Designed primarily for use with a onesemester undergraduate introductory course on the Old Testament, it is also hoped that for many who use this book in that setting or others, it will also serve as a basic reference work once the course has been completed. To that end, instructors will note that the contents are not arranged in order to make planning of one’s syllabus straightforward, but in or der to organize the material for the benefit of students and other users. The chap ters are divided into six sections. The four sections that treat the literature of the Old Testament itself each have an introductory chapter that serves as an over view of important topics that span an entire section of the Old Testament. Sections 2–5 introduce the individual books of the Old Testament divided in the traditional Christian manner into Pentateuch, Historical Books, Poetry and Wisdom and the Prophets. The sections on Pentateuch and Historical Books are arranged as in Christian Bibles, following the narrative of God’s dealing with Is rael in chronological order. The section on Poetry and Wisdom also follows the order of these books in the Bible, which one could reasonably argue is also roughly chronological according to their date of composition. However, the sec tion on the prophets follows a chronological, not canonical order. This is intend ed to help the student place each prophet into his historical context and to better understand the connections among the prophets, especially those who were con temporaries of one another.
1 Constitution of the Lutheran Church—Missouri Synod, Article II. vii
The final section consists of one chapter that summarizes important issues and historical developments in the intertestamental period. The focus here is on developments and themes that arose out of the Old Testament during this period. At the same time, this chapter begins a transition to the New Testament era and provides an overlap withCalled by the Gospel, the New Testament introduction in theCalled by the Gospel Series.This overlap is intentional. That volume con tains its own chapter on the intertestamental period, but with a focus on issues and movements that arose during the intertestamental period and had an impact on the New Testament and its times. Thus, the editors have purposely devised these two volumes to dovetail with each other and, hopefully provide a seamless transition from one to the other. Instructors will also note that several chapters treat more than one book of the Old Testament. Books that belong together by virtue of chronology (i.e., Judges and Ruth or Ezra, Nehemiah and Esther) or because they are from proph ets who were roughly contemporary (e.g., Jonah, Amos and Hosea) were grouped this way for the benefit of students. Instructors may wish to distribute the reading assignments for some of these chapters over several class periods (see especially Chapter 27—Jeremiah, Lamentations, Ezekiel and Daniel). Finally, instructors will note a distinctive feature of this introduction to the Old Testament: not only are isogogical issues discussed for each book of the Old Testament, but also many important pericopes and their meaning as well as their impact on the New Testament are explored. Since this textbook will often serve as the only Old Testament text in the only undergraduate Old Testament course taken by undergraduates who are training either to be workers in the church or are attending a Christian university or college but preparing for other profes sions, more than a simple isogogical introduction is appropriate. Unlike a semi nary introduction that is able to assume that students will take a series of herme neuticallyoriented classes on specific biblical books, courses at the undergradu ate level often are the only chance to discuss not only factsaboutthe Old Tes tament, but also specific passagesinthe Old Testament. This introduction, along with the other three volumes in theCalled by the GospelSeriesis offered to the church in hope that it can help students and other readers to be better equipped to give the world a reason for the hope in Jesus Christ that all Christian possess (1 Pet 3:15). Soli Deo Gloria. Andrew E. Steinmann
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Gen Exod Lev Num Josh Judg Ruth 1–2 Sam 1–2 Kgs 1–2 Chr Ezra Neh Esth Job Ps Prov Eccl Song Isa Jer Ezek Dan Hos Joel Amos Obad Jonah Mic Nah Hab Zeph Hag Zech Mal
Abbreviations for Books of the Bible
Genesis Exodus Leviticus Numbers Joshua Judges Ruth 1–2 Samuel 1–2 Kings 1–2 Chronicles Ezra Nehemiah Esther Job Psalms Proverbs Ecclesiastes Song of Songs Isaiah Jeremiah Ezekiel Daniel Hosea Joel Amos Obadiah Jonah Micah Nahum Habakkuk Zephaniah Haggai Zechariah Malachi
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Matt Mark Luke John Acts Rom 1–2 Cor Gal Eph Phil Col 1–2 Thess 1–2 Tim Titus Phlm Heb Jas 1–2 Pet 1–2–3 John Jude Rev
Matthew Mark Luke John Acts Romans 1–2 Corinthians Galatians Ephesians Philippians Colossians 1–2 Thessalonians 1–2 Timothy Titus Philemon Hebrews James 1–2 Peter 1–2–3 John Jude Revelation