Marking Thought and Talk in New Testament Greek

Marking Thought and Talk in New Testament Greek

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English
242 Pages

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This book uses insights from a modern theory of communication, Relevance Theory, to examine the function of the particle i(/na [SET IN SpIonic] in New Testament Greek. It claims that the particle does not have a lexical meaning of "in order that," contrary to accepted wisdom, but that it alerts the reader to expect an interpretation of the thought or attitude of the implied speaker or author. Evidence is adduced from pagan Greek and in particular the writings of Polybius, Dionysius of Halicarnassus, and Epictetus, as well as the New Testament. The implications of this claim give an opportunity for a fresh interpretation of many problematic texts.

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Published 01 January 2011
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EAN13 9781725246201
Language English
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Marking Thought and Talk in New Testament Greek
Marking Thought and Talk in New Testament Greek
New Light from Linguistics on the
Particlesi ( / n aando ( / t i
Margaret G. Sim
Foreword by Larry W. Hurtado
P I C K W I C KP u b l i c at i o n sEu g e n e , O r e g o n
MARKING THOUGHT AND TALK IN NEW TESTAMENT GREEK New Light from Linguistics on the Particlesi(/naandi/t(oCopyright © 2010 Margaret G. Sim. All rights reserved. Except for brief quotations in critical publications or reviews, no part of this book may be reproduced in any manner without prior written permission from the publisher. Write: Permissions, Wipf and Stock Publishers, 199 W. 8th Ave., Suite 3, Eugene, OR 97401. Pickwick Publications A Division of Wipf and Stock Publishers 199 W. 8th Ave., Suite 3 Eugene, OR 97401 www.wipfandstock.com ISBN 13: 978-1-61097-089-1Cataloging-in-Publication data:Sim, Margaret G.. Marking thought and talk in New Testament Greek : new light from linguistics on the particlesi(/naand/tio(/ Margaret G. Sim. xvi + 224 p. ; 23 cm. Includes bibliographical references and indexes. ISBN 13: 978-1-61097-089-11. Greek language, Biblical—particles. 2. Bible. N.T.—Language, style. I. Title. PA847 S37 2010 Manufactured in the U.S.A
Contents Foreword by Larry W. Hurtado Acknowledgements Abbreviations Chapter 1 Introduction 1.1 Background to Study 1.2 Problem to be Addressed 1.3 Review of Scholarly Opinion1.3.1 Classical Greek  Grammars1.3.2 Koine Greek 1.3.2.1 TRADITIONAL GRAMMARS1.3.2.2 PARTICULAR PROPOSALS FOR THE USE OF1.3.2.3 ANALYSIS PRESENTED BY GREEK GRAMMARIANS 1.4 Corpus 1.5 Theoretical Basis for Book1.6 Arrangement of Chapters 1.7 Summary Chapter 2 Theoretical Basis for Study 2.1 Introduction 2.2 Relevance Theory 2.2.1 General Background2.2.2 Delineation of Theory 2.2.2.1 INFERENCES  2.2.2.2 HOW INFERENCES ARE SAID TO BE DRAWN  2.2.2.3 CONDITIONS FOR SUCCESSFUL COMMUNICATION  2.2.2.4 UNDERDETERMINACY  2.2.2.4.1 SHARED CONTEXTUAL ASSUMPTIONS  2.2.2.4.2 UNDERDETERMINACY IN PARTICIPLES  2.2.2.4.3 UNDERDETERMINACY IN PARTICLES  2.2.2.5 METAREPRESENTATION
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2121 22 22 24 25 27 28 29 30 31 32 32
viiiContents  2.2.2.6 PROCEDURAL MARKERS37  2.2.2.7 OSTENSIVE BEHAVIOUR39 2.3 Purpose or Intention in Koine 40 2.4 Summary 41 Chapter 3 Independent Clauses Introduced by 43 3.1 Introduction 43 3.2. Use ofto Give an Answer to Question 46 3.3 Question and Answer by the Same Speaker 48 3.3.1 Examples from Polybius and Epictetus 49 3.3.2 New Testament Examples 51 3.4. Expressing Desire and Intention 54 3.4.1 Johannine Examples 54 3.4.2 Examples from Orators and Rhetoricians57 3.4.2.1DEMOSTHENES58 3.4.2.2 DIONYSIUS OF HALICARNASSUS58 3.4.3 Examples from Septuagint and NonLiterary Papyri 59 3.4.3.1 SEPTUAGINT59 3.4.3.2 EXAMPLES FROM PAPYRI59 3.4.4 Examples from the Epistles61 3.5 Introducing a Quotation from the Old Testament 64 3.6 Indicating Speaker’s Interpretation 68 3.7 Reporting the Thoughts or Speech of Others 71 3.8 Summary 73 Chapter 4 Requests, Commands, Prayers Introduced by 75 4.1 Introduction 75 4.2 Authorial Choice 77 Table 179 4.3 Synoptic Examples in Indirect Commands 81 4.3.1 Healing of Jairus’ Daughter81 4.3.1.1 MATTHEW 9:1882 4.3.1.2 MARK 5:2382 4.3.1.3 LUKE 8:41, 4283 4.3.1.4 CONCLUSION84 4.3.2 The Healing of a Boy with a Demon85 4.3.2.1 MATTHEW 17:15, 1685
Contents ix 4.3.2.2 MARK 9:17, 1886 4.3.2.3 LUKE 9:38, 4087 4.3.2.4 CONCLUSION88 4.3.3 The Healing of the Demon Possessed Man88 4.3.3.1 MATTHEW 8:3489 4.3.3.2 MARK 5:1789 4.3.3.3 LUKE 8:3790 4.3.3.4 CONCLUSION91 4.3.4 Authorial Choice in Same Context91 4.4 Examples from Literary Koine92 4.4.1 Examples from Dionysius of Halicarnassus934.4.2 Examples from Polybius94 4.4.3 Examples from Epictetus95 4.5 Summary 97 Chapter 5 Noun Clauses Introduced by 99 5.1 Introduction 99 5.2 Review of Metarepresentation 100 5.3 Explication of a Noun, Adjective or Demonstrative 102 5.3.1 Adjectives inStative Clauses103 5.3.1.1 NEW TESTAMENT EXAMPLES103 5.3.1.2 EXAMPLES FROM THE DISCOURSES OF EPICTETUS105 5.3.2 Nouns and Demonstratives in Stative Clauses107 5.3.3 Nouns in NonStative Clauses Complemented byClauses110 5.3.3.1 NEW TESTAMENT EXAMPLES110 5.3.3.2 EXAMPLES FROM DIONYSIUS OF HALICARNASSUS111 5.4 Noun Clauses with Impersonal Verbs 112 5.5 Noun Clauses which Function as Object of Main Verb 115 5.5.1 Examples from the New Testament116 5.5.2 Examples from Epictetus119 5.6 Prophetic Utterance Introduced by121 5.7 Summary 123 Chapter 6 Purpose Clauses Introduced by 126 6.1 Introduction 126 6.2 Purpose as Indicating Intention, and Beyond 127
xContents 6.2.1 The Role of Context in Interpreting129 6.2.2 Purpose Attributed132 6.2.2.1 AUTHOR’S ACKNOWLEDGED ATTRIBUTION OF INTENT133 6.2.2.2 REPRESENTATION OF INTENTION OF SUBJECT134 6.2.2.3 PURPOSE FROM OBSERVABLE BEHAVIOUR136 6.2.2.4 INTERPRETATION OF BEHAVIOUR PATTERNS137 6.2.2.5 ATTRIBUTION OF INTENTION WITHOUT EVIDENCE140 6.3 Other Ways of Expressing Purpose 142 6.4 Disputed Purpose Clauses 144 6.5 Summary 148 Chapter 7 Investigating 1507.1 Introduction 1507.2 Classical Greek 150 7.2.1 Direct Speech150 7.2.2 Indirect Speech151 7.2.3 Causal Clauses152 7.3 Koine Greek 153 7.3.1 Direct Speech153 7.3.2 Indirect Speech1567.3.2.1 EXAMPLES FROM EPICTETUS AND POLYBIUS157 7.3.2.2 EXAMPLES FROM THE NEW TESTAMENT160 7.3.3 Causal Clauses163 7.3.3.1 EXAMPLES FROM EPICTETUS AND POLYBIUS163 7.3.3.2 EXAMPLES FROM NEW TESTAMENT166 7.4 Summary 172 Chapter 8 Diachronic Use of 174 8.1 Introduction 174 8.2 Classical Greek 500300 BCE 175 Table 2177 8.3 Hellenistic Greek 300150 BCE 178 8.4 GraecoRoman 150 BCE to 300 CE 181 8.4.1 Separation of Registers181 8.4.1.1 HIGH LEVEL OF LANGUAGE: DIONYSIUS AND LUKEACTS 182 8.4.1.2 MORE COLLOQUIAL: EPICTETUS AND PAUL184
Contents8.4.2 Trends in Hellenistic Becoming More Marked 8.4.3 General Linguistic Changes 8.4.3.1 PHONETIC CHANGES 8.4.3.2 SYNTACTIC CHANGES 8.4.4 Language of the New Testament Table 38.4.5 Explanations Advanced for Use ofin New Testament 8.5 Modern Greek 8.6 Summary Chapter 9 Conclusion 9.1 Introduction 9.2 A Relevance Theoretic Approach to9.2.1 A Lexical Meaning for?9.2.2 Taxonomic Approach to9.2.3 The Combination ofand a Subjunctive Verb 9.2.4 Diachronic Change in the Use and Frequency of9.2.5 Interpretation ofClauses 9.3 Implications of Hypothesis 9.3.1 Implications for Interpretation 9.3.1.1 THE COMBINATION OFAND 9.3.1.2 ‘IMPERATIVAL’ 9.3.1.3WITH A FOLLOWINGCLAUSE 9.3.1.4 CAUSAL INTRODUCING ‘RESULT’ CLAUSES 9.3.2 Implications for Teaching New Testament Greek 9.4 Concluding Comments and Future Research Bibliography Scripture and Ancient Sources Index Author Index
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