The Absence of Justice
228 Pages
English

The Absence of Justice

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228 Pages
English

Description

Tragedy is a common experience that causes many believers to feel betrayed by God. Job was declared righteous by God, yet suffered a series of horrible tragedies. Most people are ill prepared to deal with tragedy, resulting in bitterness that hinders their faith and growth. Like Job, they cannot understand how a benevolent God can allow evil things to happen to good people.
Job's friends come to comfort him in his distress, but instead, attack him viciously because their creed declares that he must have blasphemed and sinned to deserve this punishment. Job held the same beliefs, but denies any wrongdoing, and ultimately sues God for a reason for his suffering.
God then asks a series of questions that for Job are unanswerable. But modern science knows the answers to God's questions. This gives rise to a surprising eschatological interpretation.
This book develops a solution to the age-old problem of evil.

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Published by
Published 14 July 2003
Reads 0
EAN13 9781725201064
Language English
Document size 1 MB

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Exrait

THE ABSENCE OF JUSTICE
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THE ABSENCE OF JUSTICE
AN ANALYSIS OF THE BOOK OF JOB
AND
THE PROBLEM OF EVIL
BY
PAUL E. LEIGHTNER
Wipf and Stock Publishers Eugeniiei, Oregon
Unless otherwise indicated, Scripture quotations used in this book are from the Holy Bible, New International Version (NIV). Copyright 1973, 1978, 1984 International Bible Society. Used by permisssion of Zondervan Bible Publishers.
Scriptures indicated KJV are from the King James Version of the Bible.
Scriptures indicated NAS are from the New American Standard Bible.
Wipf and Stock Publishers 199 West 8th Avenue, Suite 3 Eugene, Oregon 97401
The Absence of Justice An Analysis of the Book of Job And the Problem of Evil Copyright©2003 by Paul E. Leightner ISBN: 1-59244-252-8 Publication Date: July 2003
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Dedicated to my dear wife, Lois, who endured much yet encouraged much during the writing of this book.
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Chapter 6
There Is a Balm
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The Happy Ending
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Chapter 3
Chapter 5
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3
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1
The Lamentations of Job
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4
Dialogues, Round 3
Dialogues, Round 1
Chapter 9
Chapter 11
Chapter 8
Dialogues, Round 2
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190
Chapter 10
Chapter 4
Chapter 2
Chapter 7
Chapter 1
Bibliography
Appendix
God’s Answer, Part 1
The Problem of Evil
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Job Presents His Case to God
Elihu, the Brash Young Man
Chapter 13
Chapter 14
Chapter 12
The Discourses
Job’s Responses & God’s Answer, Part 2
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Table of Contents
The Wisdom Chapter
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154
Introduction
The Wager
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FOREWORD
Paul Leightner has written an extraordinarily incisive, beautifully expressed analysis of the Book of Job. His book has the merit of covering every aspect of the book in great detail and presenting clear-cut decisions on the many problems that scholars have raised in interpreting it. The discussion of the Prologue and Epilogue as well as the numerous speeches is stimulating and very carefully done.
His book has the merit of conclusively demonstrating that the common interpretation of the Book of Job—that which Job experiences and the expe-rience itself is an answer to the problem posed by the book—is unwarranted. On the contrary he shows that the meaning of God’s intervention out of the whirlwind contains an answer to the question posed by Job.
As bold as Leightner’s interpretation is, and helpful to anyone wishing to make a study of the book, perhaps it does not go far enough.
It seems to me that the issue between Job and the friends is that they are judging him without in any way taking into consideration the agony of his suffering. They refuse to put themselves in his place. They immediately judge his suffering as the consequence of sin, indeed of blasphemy. They are con-vinced that there is no suffering without sin and that all who suffer must be sinful.
The great merit of the Book of Job is to conclusively demonstrate that there is no mechanical connection between suffering and sin; on the contrary, there may be great suffering as the result of doing good. The Prophets testify to this.
But it seems that Job is guilty with respect to God of the same deficiency as the friends. He is judging God by his standard of what the universe must be like, and I believe that one of the great teachings that comes out of the Voice on the Whirlwind is God’s substantially asking Job, “When was the last time you created a world? Do you have any idea what is involved in creating this vast cosmos and all its diversity where human beings are merely an element within it?”
Justice is not a fact but rather an accomplishment that human beings must take upon themselves; that is why God in his speaking directly to Job goes from the Interrogative to the Imperative and says that he must take upon himself the burden of making the world better. This additional way of look-ing at the book in no way conflicts with Paul Leightner’s interpretation. It is a tribute to his hard work and learning and I enthusiastically endorse it for classes and individual studies.
Rabbi Jack Bemporad, Director of the Center for Interreligious Understanding (For more information, visit his website at Ciuorg@aol.com.)
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Acknowledgments
I owe a great debt of gratitude to Rabbi Jack Bemporad for his insights and encouragement. His lectures on the Book of Job gave me my first in-sights into the meaning and flow of the dialogues between Job and his friends. He had a way of condensing the long poetic passages down to a concise statement in the vernacular that made the conversations understandable. It was his style that prompted me to try to present the dialogues in a more understandable format. I have used a few of the condensations he used in his lectures almost verbatim. I simply couldn’t think of a better, different, or more concise way to state them. Thank you, Dr. Bemporad, for getting me started and also for getting me “hooked” on Job.
To those who gave their suggestions and encouragement during the years I was struggling with the problems of the Book of Job and the problem of evil, I also owe a debt of gratitude. First of all, my wife, Lois, endured many years of my mental and emotional struggles with the meanings and interpre-tations presented in this book. My son, Dr. Jonathan Leightner, provided many insights gleaned from his undergraduate studies in philosophy. Dr. Blair Ritchie, Dr. William Hasker, and Dr. Kenn Gangel each contributed much needed encouragement at critical times.
My heartfelt thanks to these and others who contributed to this work must also include Mrs. Nora Calloway, who typed many pages of early drafts be-fore we got our first computer. Susan Snowden, my editor, also contributed greatly to the finished product and was very kind in pointing out the many flaws in my manuscript.
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