273 Pages
English

The Misiri Legend Explored

-

Gain access to the library to view online
Learn more

Description

How can a black people, who do not even profess to Islam, claim to have originated from Egypt, which is such an Arabic and Islamic geographical setting? But the Kalenjiin people of Kenya have held on fast to a tradition that their ancestors in antiquity were part of ancient Pharaonic Egypt, which they variously call Tto and Misiri. As unlikely as it may sound, the persistence in keeping this oral tradition alive does not seem to be dying with time and distance from the claimed place of origin. The Misiri Legend Explored: A Linguistic Inquiry into the Kalenjiin People�s Oral Tradition of Ancient Egyptian Origin establishes the Kalenjin oral tradition of Misirian origin on the basis of linguistic evidence�a genuine tool which Egyptology scholars and researchers need to have relied on much more to bring greater and more final results to their investigations. Students of ancient Egypt willing to accept that there is an irrational prejudice against the concept of ancient black African ingenuity will upgrade their stock of knowledge regarding ancient Egypt with the numerous discoveries laid out here. They will discover a powerful new tool for their trade in the form of the African languages and cultures that now lie South of the Sahara.

Subjects

Informations

Published by
Published 29 December 2011
Reads 0
EAN13 9789966792471
Language English
Document size 7 MB

Legal information: rental price per page 0.0072€. This information is given for information only in accordance with current legislation.

THEMISIRILEGENDEXPLORED
The author, Dr Kipkoeech araap Sambu, 2011
THEMISIRILEGENDEXPLOREDA Linguistic Inquiry into the Kalenjiin People’s Oral Tradition of Ancient Egyptian Origin
Kipkoeech araap Sambu
University of Nairobi Press
First published 2011 by University of Nairobi Press Jomo Kenyatta Memorial Library P.O. Box 30197 – 00100, Nairobi Kenya Email: nup@uonbi.ac.ke | website: http//www.uonbi.ac.ke/press The University of Nairobi Press supports and promotes the University’s objectives of discovery, dissemination and preservation of knowledge and stimulation of intellectual and cultural life by publishing works of the highest quality in association with partners in different parts of the world. In doing so, it adheres to the university’s tradition of excellence, innovation, and scholarship. The moral rights of the authors have been asserted. © Kipkoeech araap Sambu, 2011. All rights reserved. Except for the quotation of fully acknowledged short passages for the purposes of criticism, review, research or teaching, no part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in any retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means without prior written permission from the University of Nairobi Press. University of Nairobi Library CIP Data Sambu, Kipkoeech The Misiri legend explored: a linguistic inquiry into the Kalenjiin people’s oral tradition of ancient Egyptian origin / K. Sambu, –Nairobi: University of Nairobi Press, 2011 272p ISBN–10–9966–792–14–7 ISBN–13–978–9966–792–14–3 1. Kalenjiin community – Origin 2. Kalenjiin community – Language and languages 3. Anthropological linguistics – Kenya – Kalenjiin 4. Kalenjin community – Culture – Origin I. Title DT 429 .K3S3 Printed by Sitima Printers and Stationers Ltd. P.O. Box 53987 – 00200 Nairobi
Table of Contents
List of Tables ........................................................................................................................................ viiList of Figures ...................................................................................................................................... viiList of Maps.......................................................................................................................................... viiList of Pictures ..................................................................................................................................... viiAbbreviations ........................................................................................................................................ ixAcknowledgements ................................................................................................................................ xiIntroduction...........................................................................................................................................xv
PART I: CULTURAL BACKGROUND .............................................................1Introduction to Part I ..............................................................................................................1
Chapter 1 ................................................................................................................................3Who are the Kalenjiin? ...............................................................................................3The People .......................................................................................................................3
Chapter 2 ..............................................................................................................................11The Hamite Factor ................................................................................................... 11DefinitionandOverview................................................................................................11The Hamitisation and De-Hamitisation of the Kalenjiin ...............................................26Merker’s Maasai/Kalenjiin Ancient Egyptian “Semites” Theory, 1904 ........................33
Chapter 3 ..............................................................................................................................37Locating the Kalenjiin’s Cradle-land and Establishing the Migration Route............ 37The Likely Misrian Abode of Tto....................................................................................47Assigning Reasons for the Departure from Egypt and a Time Frame ...........................48The Kalenjiin Language after Egypt ..............................................................................57
Chapter 4 ..............................................................................................................................61And Who are the Egyptians? .................................................................................... 61Ancient Egyptian Society as an Extension of Nilotic Africa ..........................................61Modern Egyptian Society, the Copts, and the Coptic Language....................................64Summary of Part I: Cultural Background......................................................................76
PART II: COMPARATIVE LINGUISTICS ....................................................... 81Introduction to Part II...........................................................................................................83Chapter 5 ..............................................................................................................................85Comparative vs. the Contrastive Method................................................................. 85Genetic Classification: A Comparative Linguistics Exercise ........................................88Diachronic and Synchronic Linguistics .........................................................................89Identifying and Declaring Items for a Comparative Exercise........................................90Brief Notes on the Comparative Linguistics Techniques Applied in this Study .............92Summary of Part II: Comparative Linguistics ...............................................................98
PART III: RELATING THE KALENJIIN LANGUAGE TO THE ANCIENT EGYPTIAN LANGUAGE ................................................................. 101Introduction to Part III ....................................................................................................... 103
Chapter 6............................................................................................................................ 105How Important is a Linguistics Discussion to an Oral Tradition Investigating Process? ............................................................................................. 105Lexicostatistical Analysis ............................................................................................ 107
Chapter 7............................................................................................................................ 133Ancient Egyptian-Kalenjiin Syntactic Analysis ....................................................... 133Word Order ................................................................................................................. 136Summary of Part III: Relating the Kalenjiin Language to the Ancient Egyptian Language ..................................................................................................................... 150
PART IV: CONCLUSION ................................................................................. 153A.Conclusions from the Angle of Oral Traditions................................................. 155B.Conclusions from the Comparative Linguistics Exercise .................................. 156
PART V: APPENDICES ................................................................................... 159Appendix 1.............................................................................................................. 161The Country Name “Egypt” and Other Place-name Etymologies .............................. 161Appendix 2.............................................................................................................. 166The Civilising Debt as the Bone of Contention............................................................ 166Appendix 3.............................................................................................................. 171James Massam’s Kalenjiin Hieroglyphs Story of 1927, and the Ancient Egyptian Contribution to the Modern “Western” Alphabet ....................................................... 171Appendix 4.............................................................................................................. 174Simplified Cognate Words Table ................................................................................. 175 Glossary .................................................................................................................. 187Pronunciation Guide ................................................................................................... 187 Bibliography ........................................................................................................... 217 Index ....................................................................................................................... 2 43
Table 1:Table 2:Table 3:Table 4:
Figure 1:Figure 2:
Map 1:Map 2:Map 3:
List of Tables
A lexicostatistical analysis, Kalenjiin-Ancient Egyptian/Coptic ..................112Word arrangement by semantic domain .......................................................123Huntingford’s list of Kalenjiin-Ancient Egyptian Cognate words, 1926 .....131Word order ...................................................................................................139
List of Figures
Mathematical model .......................................................................................59Hypothetical pairs of languages in a cline ranging from those with nothing in common to those that are identical ................................................86
List of Maps
Pre-colonial Kalenjiin landmass shown on a modern Kenya map....................9Kalenjiin landmasses during the colonial period ............................................10Probable routes of proto-Kalenjiin migration and settlements still inhabited by linguistically akin peoples. ........................................................40
List of Pictures
Picture 1:The famous Sphinx of Giza, Egypt.................................................................13Picture 2:A bust of “goddess” Hathor, carved on both sides of this slip of wood from Gurob.. .........................................................................................16Picture 3:..............16Isis, who was worshiped in Egypt for many thousands of years BC Picture 4:Head of Athena the Greek Goddess of the cities, arts, industry, wisdom and war..............................................................................................16Picture 5:A lady from Nandi, Chapkwe Kibirir as painted by Joy Adamson in the late 1940’s..........................................................................................2..2Picture 6:The portrait of Pharaoh Tutankhamun, 1200 BC............................................23Picture 7:More faces of Tutankhamun...........................................................................24Picture 8:The occasional Cushitic-speaking African exhibits an aquiline nose in the manner described byWebster.......................................25........................Picture 9:The Maasai moran, Moroyan, as painted by Joy Adamson in the 1940’s ......26th Picture 10:century .........................27The “Nandi Man” portrait by Ray Nestor, early 20 Picture 11:The Kalenjiin man of Marakwet, Jano araap Kessir, as painted by Joy Adamson in the 1940’s................................82...................................................Picture 12:Hathorneferhetep, limestone, 3rd Dyn, (Cairo CG 1386)...............................29Picture 13:Head of Queen Tiy, New Kingdom, 18th Dynasty.........................................30
Picture 14:The 3,300+ year old head of Pharaoh Ikhnaton from his 4-meter stone statue in Cairo Museum. .................................................................... 31Picture 15(a):The distant picture of the pyramid of Ngundeng, the Nineteenth century king of the Nuer........................................................................................... 56Picture 15(b):The close-up picture of the pyramid of Ngundeng, the Nineteenth century king of the Nuer.....65.........................................................................th Picture 16:A very long, narrow-sleeved linen dress from a 5 Dynasty (2500–2200 BC) tomb at Deshashesh. ........................................................ 62Picture 17:Professor Dr Zaki Shenouda (left), then Director of the Institute of Coptic Studies, and the author..................................................................... 65Appendix picture 1:The Great Pyramid of Cheops, Giza, Cairo, Egypt ..................... 166Appendix picture 2:A statue of Cheops, Abydos, the Dynasty, around 2600 BC....... 167Appendix picture 3:King’s head, thought to be Cheops’. ........................................... 167Appendix picture 4:Cheop’s head restored electronically by the author..................... 168Appendix picture 5:Thought to be the earliest preserved garment from Egypt........... 168
Grammatical imperative
Inclusive plural noun
sing.
MEE
v.
pl.
OIE
n.
e.s.n.
def.
e.p.n.
Abbreviations
Compare/contrast with.
Budge, E.A.W., 1920, An Egyptian Hieroglyphic Dictionary
Crum
B
Crum, W.E. 1939. A Coptic Dictionary
Inclusive singular noun
N. Mattar, 1989, A Study in Bohairic Coptic
Noun
Oxford Interactive Encyclopedia
Exclusive singular noun
Definite
Mattar
GME
The New Grolier Multimedia Encyclopedia, Release 6, 1993
Verb
Singular
C
Faulkner, R.O., 1962, Concise Dictionary of Middle Egyptian
Kal./Kalenj. Kalenjiin
indef.
Indefinite
i.p.n.
Exclusive plural noun
Editor
F.Dict.
imp.
ed.
i.s.n.
Microsoft Encarta 98 Encyclopedia, 1993–1997
B.Dict.
Cf.
Budge, E.A.W., 1920, An Egyptian Hieroglyphic Dictionary
Plural
Crum, W.E. 1939. A Coptic Dictionary