The Campaign Trail
124 Pages
English
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The Campaign Trail

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124 Pages
English

Description

In an uncomplicated plot, The Campaign Trail takes its readers through the independence of a state in fiction, the introduction of a multiparty system, to its demise owing to poor governance and power struggle; this novel has a universal appeal to the political scientist, the literary critic, the sociologist, the anthropologist and just anyone who needs entertainment. The author blends the comic and the tragic to good effect.

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Informations

Published by
Published 25 August 2011
Reads 0
EAN13 9789956726257
Language English
Document size 5 MB

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Exrait

 takes its readers through the independence of a state in fiction, the introduction of a multiparty system, to its demise owing to poor governance and power struggle; this novel has a universal appeal to the political scientist, the literary critic, the sociologist, the anthropologist and just anyone who needs entertainment. The author blends the comic and the tragic to good effect.
THE CAMP
AIGN
TRAIL FRANCIS NJI BANGSI
The Campaign Trail Francis Nji Bangsi
L a ng a a R esea rch & P u blishing CIG Mankon, Bamenda
Publisher: LangaaRPCIG Langaa Research & Publishing Common Initiative Group P.O. Box 902 Mankon Bamenda North West Region Cameroon Langaagrp@gmail.com www.langaa-rpcig.net Distributed in and outside N. America by African Books Collective orders@africanbookscollective.com www.africanbookcollective.com
ISBN: 9956-717-35-5 ©Francis Nji Bangsi 2011
DISCLAIMER All views expressed in this publication are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of Langaa RPCIG.
Dedication
To Siga Asanga, My teacher and mentor. RIP
Chapter One utuma was not a vast country. Its capital, Fusejo, firstKcolonial explorers came to settle there and to explore its was a semi-urban settlement with an agrarian outlook, which had gained prominence when the mineral depots. In terms of topography, it seems as if nature upon creation had gathered all the hills, mountains, rivers and deep valleys in this part of the world. But for its capital town, the settlements, some of which came to be known as Administrative divisions, had very difficult access. Such units were created after independence in areas where the population density was high enough. The many hills, valleys and big rivers made communication very difficult. The colonial masters had some roads dug manually to link up the mainland to the mineral depots. The fertility of the land remained a blessing to the people of Kutuma. When a seed dropped even close to a rock it grew to its full length and resulted in produce of high quality. This gave the vast expanse of land greenery that was quite pleasing to behold. Freshness was observable everywhere. This fertility was not limited to crops; it was reflected even in the procreation of Kutuma citizens. Most of the young women were mothers of twins, otherwise known as “magnis” in local parlance. One woman gave birth to as many as a dozen children. In this society, children were considered as wealth. Children provided labour for farm work. The girl child was a double blessing, for when she was given out in marriage the father enjoyed bride price and the mother received lots of material gifts. The more children one had the higher one’s social prestige. There was enough fertile farmland to produce food for all. Men of substance married 1