The Crabs of Bangui
256 Pages
English
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The Crabs of Bangui

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Gain access to the library to view online
Learn more
256 Pages
English

Description

Every man lives for himself, using his freedoms to attain his personal aims, and feels with his whole being that he can at any moment perform or not perform this or that action�The higher a man stands in the social scale, the more connections he has with others and the more power he has over them, the more conspicuous is the predestination and inevitability of every act he commits. Upon this philosophy, a former banker, Hansel Bolingo, suddenly finds [or makes] himself the regional representative of a Chinese firm that deals in crabs in Bangui. This catapults him into a position of instant wealth. His mouth-watering affluence draws immediate attention while his hypnotic powers cause hundreds of [not-so-honest]citizens to clamour for shares from which he builds up a huge fortune. But he soon discovers that he cannot deceive everybody all the time.

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Published by
Published 01 July 2010
Reads 0
EAN13 9789956578016
Language English
Document size 3 MB

Legal information: rental price per page 0.0055€. This information is given for information only in accordance with current legislation.

Exrait

TheCrabsofBangui The Crabs ofBangui linus Asong
The Crabs of Bangui
The Crabs of Bangui
Linus T. Asong
LangaaResearch & Publishing CIG Mankon,Bamenda
Publisher: LangaaRPCIG Langaa Research & Publishing Common Initiative Group P.O. Box 902 Mankon Bamenda North West Region Cameroon Langaagrp@gmail.com www.langaa-rpcig.net
Distributed outside N. America by African Books Collective orders@africanbookscollective.com www.africanbookscollective.com
Distributed in N. America by Michigan State University Press msupress@msu.edu www.msupress.msu.edu
ISBN: 9956-616-61-3
© Linus T. Asong 2010 First Published 2008 By Patron Publishing House, Bamenda
DISCLAIMER The names, characters, places and incidents in this book are either the product of the author’s imagination or are used fictitiously. Accordingly, any resemblance to actual persons, living or dead, events, or locales is entirely one of incredible coincidence.
Contents
Dedication ................................................................................vii
Chapter One ............................................................................. 1 Chapter Two .......................................................................... 15 Chapter Three ....................................................................... 23 Chapter Four .......................................................................... 27 Chapter Five .......................................................................... 41 Chapter Six ............................................................................ 53 Chapter Seven ....................................................................... 57 Chapter Eight ........................................................................ 65 Chapter Nine ......................................................................... 71 Chapter Ten ........................................................................... 79 Chapter Eleven ..................................................................... 83 Chapter Twelve ..................................................................... 91 Chapter Thirteen ................................................................... 97 Chapter Fourteen ................................................................ 103 Chapter Fifteen ................................................................... 107 Chapter Sixteen ................................................................... 115 Chapter Seventeen ............................................................. 123 Chapter Eighteen ................................................................ 131 Chapter Nineteen ............................................................... 139 Chapter Twenty ................................................................... 143
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Chapter Twenty One ......................................................... 145 Chapter Twenty Two ......................................................... 149 Chapter Twenty Three ....................................................... 153 Chapter Twenty Four ......................................................... 163 Chapter Twenty Five ......................................................... 169 Chapter Twenty Six ............................................................ 175 Chapter Twenty Seven ....................................................... 181 Chapter Twenty Eight ....................................................... 183 Chapter Twenty Nine ......................................................... 191 Chapter Thirty ..................................................................... 199 Chapter Thirty One ............................................................ 207 Chapter Thirty Two ............................................................ 217 Chapter Thirty Three ......................................................... 223 Chapter Thirty Four ........................................................... 229 Chapter Thirty Five ............................................................ 239
Dedication
For My Dear Wife, Teresa Ajab Asong Whose suggestions and perceptive reading of the draft Helped me improve on the quality of the story
vii
viii
Chapter One
fter sailing over the city ominously and menacingly andAstay. It started with a gentle breeze that blew all night, for three days the rain finally came down with all its fury, in rapid waves, as though it had decided to come as if the sprawling city, a veritable god, lay in unquiet slumber while a million invisible spirits fanned him with as many palm fronds while he slept. By the first cock’s crow it was already graduating into a gale that tore plantain and banana leaves into shreds and crushed the old, rusty, dry and falling leaves against the naked branches and rough barks of ageless and crooked mangoes, pears, oranges and countless other fruit trees at the foot of the huge antiquated Boma trees interspersing the gardens and surrounding farmlands. Zinc was torn off rooftops and swept to different quarters where it ended up in unrecognizable rubbles in gutters and bushes. Finally, in the very small hours of the morning an uncontrollable storm mixed with devastating rain tore through the entire neighbourhood. It was unsafe to travel at such moments for all but hunters and perhaps thieves and armed robbers. They left their homes as soon as it started to rain in order to track down small game, rat moles, cane-rats and even pythons and other species of snakes that had been frightened out of their hiding places by the fierceness of the rain. Thieves also took advantage of the noise and disturbances created by the downpour to break into people’s homes and business centres undetected, giving support to the popular adage that when things are bad, they make others better. Here a lucky butcher was seen with two gigantic cane-rats, two fruit bats,
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