What a Next of Kin!
168 Pages
English
Gain access to the library to view online
Learn more

What a Next of Kin!

-

Gain access to the library to view online
Learn more
168 Pages
English

Description

This psycho-anthropological and socio-cultural novel logically and succinctly x-rays the foundations and raison d'�tre of patriarchy through the implied questions - Is wealth the basis of patriarchy? Have women any role in the system? And how far can a patriarch protect his lineage from alien blood? The extremely wealthy father of eight daughters protagonist Ndi, says yes, to the first question; no, to the second; and in the third questions he says, through dogged pursuance of looking for a male heir by any means; but his lone son whom he unknowingly begot in a remote village in his early life and whom he accidentally stumbled upon and adopted as his heir in his odyssey of looking for a male heir through a series of marriages, says no, to the first question; yes, to the second and to the third question, he says fate is the umpire; and succeeds in convincing his father that he is right.

Subjects

Informations

Published by
Published 01 July 2010
Reads 12
EAN13 9789956578849
Language English
Document size 5 MB

Legal information: rental price per page 0.0045€. This information is given for information only in accordance with current legislation.

Exrait

What a Next of Kin! Alobwed’Epie
What a Next of Kin!
What a Next of Kin!
Charles Alobwed’Epie
LangaaResearch & Publishing CIG Mankon,Bamenda
Publisher: LangaaRPCIG Langaa Research & Publishing Common Initiative Group P.O. Box 902 Mankon Bamenda North West Region Cameroon Langaagrp@gmail.com www.langaa-rpcig.net
Distributed outside N. America by African Books Collective orders@africanbookscollective.com www.africanbookscollective.com
Distributed in N. America by Michigan State University Press msupress@msu.edu www.msupress.msu.edu
ISBN: 9956-616-62-1
© Charles Alobwed’Epie 2010
DISCLAIMER The names, characters, places and incidents in this book are either the product of the author’s imagination or are used fictitiously. Accordingly, any resemblance to actual persons, living or dead, events, or locales is entirely one of incredible coincidence.
Contents
Chapter One ............................................................................. 1 Chapter Two ............................................................................. 7 Chapter Three ....................................................................... 11 Chapter Four .......................................................................... 17 Chapter Five .......................................................................... 21 Chapter Six ............................................................................ 25 Chapter Seven ....................................................................... 29 Chapter Eight ........................................................................ 35 Chapter Nine ......................................................................... 39 Chapter Ten ........................................................................... 45 Chapter Eleven ..................................................................... 49 Chapter Twelve ..................................................................... 53 Chapter Thirteen ................................................................... 63 Chapter Fourteen .................................................................. 67 Chapter Fifteen ..................................................................... 73 Chapter Sixteen ..................................................................... 79 Chapter Seventeen ............................................................... 85 Chapter Eighteen .................................................................. 91 Chapter Nineteen ................................................................. 97 Chapter Twenty ................................................................... 101 Chapter Twenty One ......................................................... 107 Chapter Twenty Two ......................................................... 111 Chapter Twenty Three ....................................................... 115
v
Chapter Twenty Four ......................................................... 121 Chapter Twenty Five ......................................................... 127 Chapter Twenty Six ............................................................ 133 Chapter Twenty Seven ....................................................... 137 Chapter Twenty Eight ....................................................... 141 Chapter Twenty Nine ......................................................... 145 Chapter Thirty ..................................................................... 153
vi
Chapter One
s usual in the evening Mr. Ndi sat in his veranda A singing one of his lachrymose songs that made him sigh and sigh until he went to bed in disgust. That day he turned and saw his eldest daughter enter the house with a shopping bag. She had done the last shopping before the D day. He eyed her with mixed feelings – half admiringly and half disdainfully and shook his head. She was a pearl of unearthly beauty – tall, black and stately. She was in fact a replica of her mother, a woman he had loved beyond description, but a woman who died in childbirth leaving behind that proverbial beauty. He recalled how he had taken the child to Shishong orphanage and after years of missionary expertise and devotion the Reverend Sisters had made the child survive. He was then invited to come for the child. He went for her and after paying a negligible amount, he was given the child. Now Emma (Immaculate), as he fondly called her was preparing for marriage and would very soon become some other person’s property. “Oh, that she were a boy!” he exclaimed in his heart and sighed. Gall jetted into his mouth. He spat out what he could and swallowed what he could not. A chill ran through him as he thought if he had known that his first wife’s witchery would render his future so bleak, he would have killed her when he first suspected that she was responsible for his misfortunes. He remembered vividly how after years of a childless marriage he had sought her approval before getting married to his late second wife. He was then a ‘head-man’ at the CDC rubber plantation in Tiko.
1