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English

The Old Man and the Sea

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USA , BIOGRAPHIES , LITERARY ANALYSIS , LITTERATEURS , LITERARY TEXTS , LITERARY STYLE , WESTERNS

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Published 01 January 2007
Reads 13
EAN13 9796500118482
Language English

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Ernest Miller Hemingway
THE OLD MAN AND THE SEA
Edited with an Introduction By Gamal Abdel Nasser (Professor of English Literature)
THE ANGLO-EGYPTIAN BOOKSHOP
165, Mohamed Farid Street - Cairo
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THE OLD MAN AND THE SEA
Preface
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This is an Egyptian edition of one of the most internationally celebrated works of fiction, Hemingway’sThe old Man and the Sea. A Pulitzer-award and - Noble-prize winner, this work has cer-tainly become so extensively known all over the world, receiving a myriad of critical studies and translations. Hemingway himself could have never imagined such a sweeping success for his novel-la, devised while temporarily staying (for a few weeks) at a fishing village in Cuba. It is not simply the story of a big fish catch, but it is the story of a touching human relationship between old age and younghood, not to mention its highly philosophical message that it carries. All this, apart from other equally significant factors, makes Hemingway’s work worth reading and contemplating.
Prof. Gamal Abdel Nasser
(Giza-Summer of 2007)
THE OLD MAN AND THE SEA
Preface
CONTENTS
I. Introduction
i. Hemingway: Life & Background
ii. Hemingway: Writing Career
iii. Plot Overview
iv. Skeletal Summary
The Old Man and the Sea
II. The Text
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I. INTRODUCTION
THE OLD MAN AND THE SEA
i. Himingway: Life & Backround
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Ernest Hemingway was born in Oak Park, Illinois, on July 21, 1899. He was the second of six children of Dr and Mrs Clar-ence Hemingway who, although devoted to each other, were tem-peramentally very different: while Mrs Hemingway was a. deeply religious woman with a passion for music, her husband was an out-doors man, fond of hunting and fishing. Ernest took after his father with a passion for the rough and tumble like fishing, boxing, big game hunting, and later with the dangerous edge, of things, report-ing from the frontline in the First World War, the Spanish Civil War and the Second World War. Hemingway was seriously injured on the Italian front which left him with a permanent handicap that was reflected in his writings on the cruelty and stoic endurance that war requires.
Most writers begin their careers as reporters and so did Hem-ingway, first withKansas City Starand later with theToronto Star. The newspapers gave him the opportunity to visit the frontlines and meet all the leading European statesmen-Lloyd George, Clemen-ceau, Mussolini-who were to play a leading role in world politics in the 20s and 30s. Hemingway made Paris his base and it was dur-ing one of his visits here that he met the American writer, Sher-wood Anderson, who gave him a letter of introduction to the critic Gertrude Stein. With this, Hemingway was introduced to the world of writers and artists who visited Stein often. It was Stein who cas-ually commented that all writers of the time were "a lost genera-tion" which Hemingway was to use as an epitaph to A Sun Also Rises.
The "lost generation" was immediately acceptable to readers of the 20s and 30s. They were inheritors of a peace settlement after the First World War that brought worldwide depression and sowed the seeds of Nazism and Fascism and the Second World War. For this generation which believed that the ideals of peace and democ-racy would be preserved after all the sacrifices made in the First World War the developments of the 20s and 30s were a cruel blow
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THE OLD MAN AND THE SEA
to their aspirations. They were indeed "lost" and did not know where to turn to for an understanding of what had happened. Hem-ingway addressed this audience with a series of novels that had a background of war, violence and uncertainty:The Sun Also Rises, A Farewell to Arms,Across the River and into the Trees, For Whom the Bell Tolls.
Hemingway's life was anything if not colourful. He married several times and had affairs with women, but none of them lasted for long. Apart from these relationships, what struck him hard was the suicide of his father who had long been ill with hypertension and diabetes. In 1940, Hemingway married Martha Gelhorn, the photographer, and together they toured China and then bought a house in Cuba which became more or less his home.
Hemingway wrote his work,The Old Man and the Sea in 1952 for which he received the Pulitzer Prize in 1953 and the No-bel in 1354. The citation of the Nobel said that Hemingway was awarded the Prize "for his powerful style-forming mastery of the art of modern narration, as most recently evidenced inThe Old Man and the Sea. " In talking about the novel, Hemingway said that he had probably read it two hundred times before giving the manuscript to his publishers. He went on to say. "What many an-other writer would be content to leave in massive proportions, I polish into a tiny gem:"
ii. Hemingway: Writing Career
Hemingway's writing career began early; he edited the high school newspaper and, after graduation, got a job as a reporter on theKansas City Star, after he was turned down by the Kansas City draft boards. Hemingway's sights, however, were still set on Eu-rope and he was at last successful in his attempts to serve the war effort: he joined a volunteer American Red Cross ambulance unit as a driver. Shortly thereafter, Hemingway was seriously wounded at Fossalta on the Italian Piave and he recalls that life slid from him, "like you'd pull a silk handkerchief out of a pocket by a cor-ner," almost fluttered away, then returned. It is thought by some lit-