The Repressed Expressed
264 Pages
English
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The Repressed Expressed

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Gain access to the library to view online
Learn more
264 Pages
English

Description

Through multiple points of resistance, The Repressed Expressed underscores how hard it is to build a community in any nation with no beneficial qualities of hope and transparency. This informative collection of essays highlights that wherever stability and order are lacking, the universal appeal is to express that which is suppressed. Also, like a map or guidebook, The Repressed Expressed indicates how people in such geographical prisons strive to transform their agitation into spiritual and political pathways, free of pain and hurt from, and anger towards a dirty and corrupted world. It thus, underpins discord and brings to the fore the authority�s penchant for heaping abuse upon those caused to live in fear. In short, The Repressed Expressed is an impressive compilation of literary evidence informing scholarship on opinions and beliefs relating to repression, its expression, and the immeasurable associated cost.

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Published 17 January 2017
Reads 3
EAN13 9789956764648
Language English
Document size 2 MB

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no beneficial qualities of hope and transparency. This informative collection of essays highlights that wherever stability and order are lacking, the universal appeal is to express that which is suppressed.
how people in such geographical prisons strive to transform their
hurt from, and anger towards a dirty and corrupted world. It thus,
for heaping abuse upon those caused to live in fear. In short, is an impressive compilation of literary evidence
its expression, and the immeasurable associated cost.
BILL F. NDI, is an Associate Professor of English and Foreign Languages at Tuskegee University. His research interests include Early Quakerism,
global cultural and media studies.
ADAKU T. ANKUMAH is Professor and interim chair of the Department of Modern Languages, Communication and Philosophy at Tuskegee University. Her research focuses on women’s literature especially African and Diasporic women.
BENJAMIN HART FISHKIN University. His interests include Anglophone Cameroon literature, problems of
the single-parent home.
The Repressed Expressed
The Repressed ExpressedNovel Perspectives on African and Black Diasporic Literature
Edited by Bill F. Ndi Adaku T. Ankuma Benjamin Hart Fishkin
The Repressed Expressed: Novel Perspectives on African and Black Diasporic Literature
Edited by Bill F. Ndi Adaku T. Ankuma Benjamin Hart Fishkin
L a ng a a R esea rch & P u blishing CIG Mankon, Bamenda
Publisher:LangaaRPCIG Langaa Research & Publishing Common Initiative Group P.O. Box 902 Mankon Bamenda North West Region Cameroon Langaagrp@gmail.comwww.langaa-rpcig.net Distributed in and outside N. America by African Books Collective orders@africanbookscollective.com www.africanbookscollective.com ISBN-10: 9956-764-62-0 ISBN-13: 978-9956-764-62-4 ©Bill F. Ndi, Adaku T. Ankuma, Benjamin Hart Fishkin 2017All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, mechanical or electronic, including photocopying and recording, or be stored in any information storage or retrieval system, without written permission from the publisher
Dedication To all British Southern Cameroonians killed and or maimed on their territorythe as y express their resistance to oppression fromLa publique du Cameroun.No dropofyour blood willgo in vain. Bill F. Ndi To all who are beingpersecuted in variousparts of the world for daringto stand upfor what theybelieve. Adaku T. Ankumah To the loving memoryStanle of y Hochman; the best, kindest and most compassionate uncle, mentor and teacher aperson can hope to find. Benjamin Hart Fishkin
The EditorsBill F. Ndi,Associate Professor ofEnglish and Foreign Languages at Tuskegee University, Tuskegee, Alabama, USA, earned his Doctorate from the University of Cergy-Pontoise in 2001. He is a poet, playwright, storyteller, literary critic, translator, historian of ideas and mentalities as well as an academic who has held teaching positions in several universities in Australia, France and elsewhere. His areas of teaching and research comprise among others English Languages and literatures, French, Professional, Technical and Creative Writing, World Literatures, Applied/Historical Linguistics, Literary History, Media and Communication Studies, Peace/Quaker Studies and Conflict Resolution, History of Internationalism, History th of Ideas and Mentalities, Translation & Translatology, 17 Century and Contemporary Cultural Studies. He has published extensively in these areas. His publications include numerous scholarly works on Early Quakerism and translation of Early Quaker writings. He has also published poetry and plays in both the French and the English languages. Professor Bill F. Ndi has 18 published volumes of poetry of which 5 are in French, a play and 4 works in translation. He is co-editor ofOutward Evil, Inward Battle: Human Memory in Literaturewith Adaku T. Ankumah, Benjamin Hart Fishkin, and Festus Fru Ndeh as well as co-editor ofFears, Doubts, and Joys of not Belongingwith Adaku T. Ankumah and Benjamin Hart Fishkin. His most recent edited work isSecret, Silences, and Betrayals.Also, he has served as a National Endowment for the Humanities’ scholar. Adaku T. Ankumah,Interim Chair and Professor of English at Tuskegee University, received her PhD in Comparative Literature from the University of Wisconsin-Madison with a minor in drama. Her dissertation and initial research interests focused on revolutionary playwrights from the African Diaspora, such as Kenyan Ngugi wa Thiong'o, Martiniquais writer Aimé Césaire, and African American Amiri Baraka, who use their creative efforts to work for the destruction of what they consider to be the colonial/capitalist foundation of post-colonial Africa. Ngugi’s play The Trial of Dedan Kimathi, a play that examines the arrest and trial of one of the famous leaders of the Mau Mau revolt against the British
in Kenya in the 1950’s, has been the subject of her published research. She has also done research on the role of women in revolutionary theatre, voicelessness of African women, and gender and politics in the works of African women authors like Mariama Bâ, Ama Ata Aidoo and Tsitsi Dangarembga. Professor Ankumah’s recent research interest includes the writings of women in the African diaspora. This includes research on memory in literature and its role in helping those dealing with painful, fragmented pasts forge a wholesome future in Edwidge Danticat’s The Dew Breaker. She has also examined memory and resistance in the poetry of South African performer and writer Gcina Mhlophe. She recently editedNomenclatural Poetization and Globalization.Also, sheco-edited, with Bill F. Ndi, Benjamin Hart Fishkin and Festus Fru Ndeh, Outward Evil Inward Battle: Human Memory in Literature,and with Bill F Ndi and Benjamin Hart Fiskin:Fears, Doubts, and Joys of not Belonging.Benjamin Hart Fishkin, Associate Professor of English at Tuskegee University specializes in teaching Nineteenth Century British Literature. He holds a Ph.D. from the University of Alabama where he served as a Junior Fellow in The Blount Undergraduate Initiative. In his research, he has emphasized Nineteenth Century British Literature through each phase of his education. Prior to earning his Doctorate from the University of Alabama in May of 2009, he obtained a BA in English and Film from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and an MA from Miami University, Oxford, Ohio where he examined the interest of Charles Dickens in the theatre and how the stage influenced his novel writing. He has publishedThe Undependable Bonds of Blood: The Unanticipated Problems of Parenthood in the Novels of Henry James. He co-editedOutward Evil Inward Battle: Human Memory in Literature with Adaku T. Ankumah, Bill F. Ndi, and Festus Fru Ndeh, andFears, Doubts and Joys of not Belonging with Adaku T. Ankumah and Bill F. Ndi.His recent research interests include, besides his growing interest in Anglophone Cameroon literature, the problems of marriage and the American family, and the relationship between the Blues and the single-parent home in the works of William Faulkner, August Wilson, and F. Scott Fitzgerald.
Authors Adaku T. Ankumahis Professor of English at Tuskegee University and chairs the Department of Modern Languages, Communication and Philosophy. She holds a Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Her areas of interest include women’s literature (with a focus on African and Diaspora women) and the short story genre. Antonio J. Jimenez-Munozis lecturer at the University of Oviedo, Spain. His research takes on the influence of Romantic literature and culture upon thepresent. His main line of research deals with the influence of Romantic legacies in modernpoetry and art and particularly the material continuity of Romantic modes of expression in contemporary art-forms. His fields of interest are Literary Criticism, Theory, and World Poetry. Before his currentposition, he was a TeachingFellow at the universities of Kent at Canterbury-UK (2001-2004) and Hull-UK (2004-2006), aftergraduating in English Studies at the University of Cordoba (Spain) in 2001. Benjamin Hart Fishkinan Associate Professor of En is glish at Tuskegee University, where he specializes in teaching Nineteenth Century British Literature. He holds a Ph.D. from the University of Alabama where he served as a Junior Fellow in The Blount Undergraduate Initiative. Bill F. Ndi,teaches at Tuskegee University. He has numerous scholarly publications on Early Quakerism and translation of Early Quaker writings. He has also published extensively in both the French and the English languages. These publications include scholarly articles and book chapters, poetry, and plays. Professor Bill F. Ndi has 18 volumes of poetry of which 5 are in French, a play and 4 works in translation. Emmanuel Fru Dohholds a Ph.D. from the University of Ibadan and has taught in colleges and universities in Cameroon and the United States since 1990. Poet, novelist, social and literary critic, his
research interests, with a remarkable interdisciplinary approach, include Africa’s literatures, cultures, and politics; the African diaspora; and colonial and postcolonial literatures. Besides fictional and poetic works, Doh has published numerous substantial scholarly works, includingAfrica’s political Wasteland: The Bastardization of Cameroon, andStereotyping Africa: Surprising Answers to Surprising Questions, Anglophone-Cameroon Literature: An Introduction, The Obasinjom Warrior: The Life and Works of Bate Besong.Also worthy of mention is a significant book chapter inFears, Doubts, and Joys of not Belonging:“Bill F. Ndi’s Social Angst and Humanist Vision: Politics Alienation and the Quest for Freedom inK’cracy, Trees in the Storm and Other Poems”. He is currently teaching in the Department of English at Century College in Minnesota. Rhonda Collieran Associate Professor of English at Tuskegee is University, where she also serves as the Interim Director of the TU Global Office. She is a Fulbright Scholar, who studied at the Universidad de São Paulo in Brazil. She received her Ph.D. in Comparative Literature from Vanderbilt University in Nashville, TN. She also holds a B.S. and a Master’s degree in Industrial Engineering from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville and Georgia Tech respectively. She has published in the areas of Afro-Brazilian, Afro-Cuban, African-American, and global hip hop studies. At Tuskegee, she focuses on American literature and composition courses with an emphasis on service-learning. Her work “Mothering Cuba: The Poetics of Afro-Cuban Women” appears inAnother Black Like Me: The Construction of Identities and Solidarity in the African Diaspora(Cambridge Scholar Press, 2015). Her upcoming work will focus on Afro-German hip hop. She discusses art as a space of forgiveness and reconciliation. She is passionate about education abroad and cross-cultural student engagement. Richard Evansis assistant professor of English at Tuskegee University in Tuskegee, Alabama. Educated in classics at the University of South Carolina, the American School of Classical Studies at Athens and Columbia University, Dr. Evans holds a Ph.D. in comparative literature with research interests in ancient and medieval literatures, theories of translation and linguistic relativity.
He has published numerous academic book reviews, essays promoting the study of Classical Greek in schools, and articles on Greek and Roman authors in the Dictionary of Literary Biographyand articles on various topics in classical literature. Yosimbom Hassan Mbiydzenyuyholds a PhD in Literature from the University of Yaoundé 1 Cameroon. Currently, he teaches in the Department of English, University of Buea, Cameroon. His PhD thesis explores “Identity Dynamics in Cameroon Literature”. His current research interests and projects focus on the links between Postcolonial and Postmodern theories, and how their interplay shapes and nurtures multiple-layered identity formation and performance in postcolonial societies, especially Cameroon. Also, he is keen on researching Latin American epistemological foundations such as Transmodernity, Coloniality, Decoloniality, Pluriversality, etc. and how they could be used to de-/re-construct postcolonial African societies.