Breakthrough: Corporate South Africa in a Green Economy
350 Pages
English
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Breakthrough: Corporate South Africa in a Green Economy

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Gain access to the library to view online
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350 Pages
English

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This book addresses hot issues pertaining to the manner in which corporate South Africa has engaged the emerging green global economy. Firstly, the book profiles the green and low carbon economy landscape in South Africa and interfaces it with global trends. This way, the book aligns very well in terms of the Rio+20 outcomes on 'The Future We Want' that fully embraces the green global economy in the context of sustainable development and poverty eradication. The rest of the chapters in the book profile breakthroughs from selected companies. The book also comes as the second in a series that is addressing global and national concerns on the green global economy agenda. The first book entitled 'Green Economy and Climate Mitigation: Topics of Relevance to Africa' was produced as part of the 17th Session of the Conference of Parties' collaborative work carried out by the Institute of Global Dialogue, the Africa Institute of South Africa and Unisa's Institute for Corporate Citizenship. The book 'Breakthrough: Corporate South Africa in the Green Economy' comes in seven parts. Part I focuses on the Green Economy Landscape. This part considers both the international and national perspectives. Parts II-VI present different sector initiatives namely: Mining and Energy (Part II), Banking and Insurance (Part III), Forest and Paper (Part IV), Industrial (Part V) and Retailing and Aviation (Part VI). The last part is made up of a single chapter dealing with Emerging Issues and Way Forward.

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Published 05 May 2014
Reads 3
EAN13 9780798304597
Language English
Document size 14 MB

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Exrait

Breakthrough: Corporate South Afrîca în a Green Economy
Edîted by Godwell Nhamo
BREAKTHROUGH: CORPORATE SOUTH AFRICA IN A GREEN ECONOMY
First Published in 2014 by the Africa Institute of South Africa PO Box 630 Pretoria 0001 South Africa
ISBN: 9780798304566
© Copyright Africa Institute of South Africa 2014
No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted by any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without prior permission from the copyright owner. Any unauthorised copying could lead to civil liability and/or criminal sanctions.
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Telephone: 086 12 DALRO from within South Africa); +27 0)11 7128000 Telefax: +27 0)11 4039094 Postal Address: P O Box 31627, Braamfontein, 2017, South Africa www.dalro.co.za
Any unauthorised copying could lead to civil liability and/or criminal sanctions.
Opinions expressed and conclusions arrived at in this book are those of the authors and should not be attributed to the Africa Institute of South Africa.
Project Manager: Mmakwena Chipu Editing: Yvonne Thiebault Proofreading: Alison Ziki Design and Layout: Pamset Printing: Impumelelo Print Solutions
The Africa Institute of South Africa is a think tank and research oganization, focusing on political, socioeconomic, international and development issues in contemporary Africa. The Institute conducts research, publishes books, monographs, occasional papers, policy briefs and a quarterly journal Africa Insight. The Institute holds regular seminars on issues of topical interest. It is also home to one of the best library and documentation centres worldwide, with materials on every African country.
For more information, contact the Africa Institute at PO Box 630, Pretoria 0001, South Africa; Email ai@ai.org.za; or visit our website at http://www.ai.org.za
Table of Contents
Foreword
Preace
Acknowledgements
About the contrîbutors
Abbrevîatîons and acronyms
PART I: GREEN ECONOMY LANDSCAPE: INTERNATIONAL AND NATIONAL PERSPECTIVES
CHAPTER 1 Busîness în the green global economy Godwell Nhamo and Nedson Pophiwa
CHAPTER 2 Mappîng the green economy landscape în South Arîca Godwell Nhamo, Nedson Pophiwa and Mapula Tshangela
CHAPTER 3 Thîrd alternatîve to îndustrîal development: Role o the NCPC în resource eîcîency and cleaner productîon în South Arîca Marié Uys and Sunette Steyn
PART II: MINING AND ENERGY
CHAPTER 4 Exxaro: Powerîng possîbîlîty through clean and renewable energy technology ventures Muchaiteyi Togo
CHAPTER 5 From methane curse to carbon tradîng at Gold Fîelds Letitia Greyling
CHAPTER 6 Natural gas conversîon: Sasol’s low carbon transîtîon lagshîp or the petrochemîcals îndustry Shingirirai Savious Mutanga
vîîî
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Chapter 7 Pele’s renewable energy packages or households and small busînesses across Arîca Fumani Mthembi
PART III: BANKING AND INSURANCE
Chapter 8 FîrstRand’s responsîble înancîng and the green economy Godwell Nhamo
Chapter 9 Nedbank and the transîtîon to low carbon operatîons Alfred Bimha
Chapter 10 Santam’s eco-centrîc journey: Workîng wîth the Insurance Industry towards a Low Carbon Economy Soul Shava
PART IV: FOREST AND PAPER
Chapter 11 Addressîng clîmate change through resource eîcîency and combîned heat and power systems at Mondî Madeleine Fombad and Godwell Nhamo
Chapter 12 Energy sel-suîcîency or sustaînably managed orestry and manuacturîng operatîons at Sappî Memory Tekere
PART V: INDUSTRIAL
Chapter 13 Lînkîng carbon to culture at Altron Grant R. Howard, Andrew Johnston and Jannette Horn
Chapter 14 Ensurîng sustaînabîlîty through strategy at Barloworld Godwell Nhamo
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PART VI: RETAILING AND AVIATION
Chapter 15 Pîck ’n Pay’s supply chaîn connectîvîty, ood securîty and the green economy Godwell Nhamo
Chapter 16 Addressîng carbon reductîon through cîvîl avîatîon îndustry’s our pîllar strategy împlementatîon at South Arîcan Aîrways Godwell Nhamo and Chipo Nyamwena-Mukonza
PART VII: LOOKING AHEAD
Chapter 17 Emergîng trends and learnîng poîntsGodwell Nhamo
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Foreword
We all look forward to a day when our visions and dreams become reality. However, despite hopes of abreakthrough,an ‘Aha-a!’ moment is seldom realised by the world. In relation to addressing the globe’s key environmental challenges, change has over the past few years tended to be incremental and slow, and not without setbacks. In particular, despite a clear understanding of the risks that global warming poses for all of our futures and that of the planet, the hoped for agreement that would limit global temperature in-crease to below two degrees Celsius has not materialised. Nevertheless, worldwide there has been a slow but steady movement towards policies, technologies, and practices that have less emissions and less impact on the atmosphere and the environment. The agenda to have the green economy accepted as one of the many tools in the con-text of sustainable development and poverty eradication emerged in 2008. In the prepara-tory session of the Rio+20, world governments and other key players including business and industry started debating one of the set thematic areas for the Rio+20 talks: Green Economy in the Context of Sustainable Development and Poverty Eradication. This narra-tive formed part of the Rio+20 outcomes document commonly known asThe Future We Want.A notable feature of the Rio+20 Conference was the extent to which the corporate world stepped forward to indicate its commitment to sustainable practices and in par-ticular engaged with the question of the linkages between environmental goods, practice and inclusive growth that would also address poverty and inequality. South Africa has been no exception to this. The South African Government has continued to play a leader-ship role internationally and for its part, corporate South Africa has stepped up to the plate too in terms of practical activities and environmental and corporate disclosure, and has also demonstrated a willingness to invest substantially in the green economy. Two key examples are the South African corporate taking the lead in the internationally run Carbon Disclosure Project, and the extent to which South African banks have financed the country’s renewable energy roll out. It is in this context that this book,Breakthrough: Corporate South Africa in a Green Economywritten. The authors realised that there was something that corporate was South Africa could be commended for in the manner in which it was addressing sustain-ability issues, especially climate change and the need to reduce greenhouse gases as well as adapting to the changing climate. The green economy, therefore, becomes a platform that brings these issues into the context of implementation. From the research done, exciting breakthroughs emerged. These include: Exxaro Resources Ltd’s Powering Possibility Through Clean and Renewable Energy Technology ven-tures; ‘From Methane Curse to Carbon Trading’ at Gold Fields; Sasol’s Natural Gas Conversion and their low carbon transition flagship for the petrochemicals industry; Pele’s renewable energy packages for households and small businesses across Africa; FirstRand’s ‘Responsible
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Foreword
Financing and the Green Economy’; Nedbank’s transition to low carbon operations; Santam’s ‘Eco-centric Journey: Working with the Insurance Industry Towards a Low Carbon Economy’; addressing climate change through resource efficiency and combined heat and power sys-tems at Mondi; energy self-sufficiency for sustainably managed forestry and manufacturing operations at Sappi; ‘Linking Carbon to Culture’ at Altron; ‘Ensuring Sustainability Through Strategy’ at Barloworld; Pick n Pay’s supply chain connectivity, food security, and the green economy; and SAA’s response to civil aviation industry’s drive towards low carbon skies. It is our hope that recording these examples of corporate excellence will inspire and sup-port the efforts of others in the private sector and so contribute to a much wider scale of initiatives and change.
Joanne Yawitch Chief Executive Officer National Business Initiative (NBI)
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Preface
This book addresses issues pertaining to the manner in which corporate South Africa has engaged the emerging green and low carbon global economy. The book first profiles the green and low carbon economy landscape in South Africa, and then interfaces it with global trends. This way, the book aligns very well in terms of the Rio+20 outcomes document entitled ‘The Future We Want’ that fully embrace the green global economy in the context of sustainable development and poverty eradication. The rest of the chapters in the book profile breakthroughs from selected companies. The book also comes as the second in a series that is addressing global and national concerns on the green global economy agenda. The first book entitledGreen Economy and Climate Mitigation: Topics of th Relevance to AfricaSession of the Conference of Parties’was produced as part of the 17 collaborative work carried out by the Institute of Global Dialogue, the Africa Institute of South Africa, and Unisa’s Institute for Corporate Citizenship. The bookBreakthrough: Corporate South Africa in a Green Economycomes in seven parts. Part I focuses on the green economy landscape. This part considers both the inter-national and national perspectives. Parts II-VI present different sector initiatives, namely mining and energy (Part II), banking and insurance (Part III), forestry and paper (Part IV), Industrial (Part V), and retailing and aviation (Part VI). The last part is made up of a single chapter dealing with emerging trends and learning points.
Professor Godwell Nhamo Editor and Project Leader Exxaro Chair in Business and Climate Change, Unisa
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Acknowledgements
The book project leader and editor, Professor Godwell Nhamo, wishes to thank the follow-ing organisations and people for their generous support, financially and in kind. Exxaro Resources Ltd is acknowledged for its financial support since 2008, now running in the second phase: 2011–2015. The authors, blind peer reviewers, the CEMS Deanery, and the Institute for Corporate Citizenship had an invaluable input in the writing and publishing process. I also want to thank my family, especially my spouse Dr Senia Nhamo, and my children Anesu, Tsitsi and Makanaka Nhamo for all the support they continue to render towards my work. I also express my sincere thanks to the publishers, whom I hereby acknowledge for a quality product. This gesture will not be complete without acknowledging two of Unisa’s executive management team members who drive the green economy and sustainability model with the championing it deserves: Principal and Vice-Chancellor of Unisa, Prof Mandla Makhanya, and Professor Divya Singh, Unisa Vice Principal: Advisory and Assurance Services.
The Peer Revîew Process
The book manuscript was subjected to the double blind peer review process through the Unisa Press mechanisms. The book manuscript was further subjected to the second set of blind peer review process by the Africa Institute of South Africa (AISA) before its publica-tion. The editor presided over the incorporation of all blind peer review comments and observations in order to enhance the quality of the publication. Authors, however, take full responsibility of any liabilities associated with their work.
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