Hope and Hard Times
337 Pages
English

Hope and Hard Times

-

337 Pages
English

Description

This book will be advertised in Mother Earth News, On Earth, Backhome, Communities magazine and Permaculture Activist Review copies - between 100-150 review copies sent out to highly targeted list, including author requests, our "hit list" and appropriate media Author pitched as guest speakers at NSP-attended conferences, where appropriate

More than a dozen years ago, Ted Bernard traveled to nine communities across the United States to meet residents who were working collaboratively to solve natural resource conflicts. While there may have been different perspectives as to process, their common goal was to achieve higher levels of sustainability as vibrant communities. He visited places as diverse as tiny one-mile-square Monhegan Island in Maine and cities as large as Chicago and Chattanooga and, with Jora Young, wrote about his findings in The Ecology of Hope (1997).

Now Bernard has caught up with these communities again, to discover their progress and see what a difference their collaborative conservation has made in fifteen years. Hope and Hard Times chronicles that journey; the successes, the speed bumps, and the remarkable tenacity and persistence of the partnerships and initiatives driving change during exceedingly hard times. Overall, community-based sustainability initiatives have proved resilient, despite the downward-spiraling of the global economy and the looming problems of global climate change. Their quest points to the need for new perceptions of nature and of humankind, more guidance from nature, and less consumption and materialism. They offer advice on how to live on pieces of land without spoiling them.

These narratives offer hopeful roadmaps for other communities who are working toward a sustainable future, and will appeal to community activists, natural resource professionals, educators, and environmentalists.

Ted Bernard is a professor of environmental studies at Ohio University, and co-author of The Ecology of Hope. He lives in the Shade River watershed in southern Ohio.


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Published by
Published 01 January 2010
Reads 0
EAN13 9781550924428
Language English
Document size 3 MB

Legal information: rental price per page €. This information is given for information only in accordance with current legislation.

Exrait

Advance Praise for
InHope and Hard Times, Ted Bernard tempers his optimism in the power of collaborative conservation with a down-to-earth account of nine communities and how their restoration efforts have fared since the 1990s. Despite the adversities he details, Bernard inspires passion for grassroots initiatives. And he tells us where to find hope: Off the beaten path in the company of those who have shed ego for community and dedicated themselves to making their worlds sustainable.
— JANEBRAXTONLITTLE, author of national magazine articles exploring natural resources, the scientists who study them and the people who manage them.
Updating true stories of communities collaborating for self-regeneration, Ted Bernard’s gracefully written Hope and Hard Timesis an essential read for anyone serious about organizing for eco-social resilience. A wise, richly informative and inspiring book.
— STEPHANIEMILLS, author ofTough Little Beauties
Intuition might tell us that ecological resilience requires community resilience, and vice versa. In this collection of updated case studies, some disturbing, most uplifting, Ted Bernard shows how and why this is true. In the process, he shows how the struggle for sustainability is never easy and never ends.
— THOMASPRINCEN, Associate Professor of Natural Resource and Environmental Policy, University of Michigan, and author ofTreading Softly: Paths to Ecological Order
new society publishers
Cataloging in Publication Data: A catalog record for this publication is available from the National Library of Canada.
Copyright © 2010 by Ted Bernard. All rights reserved.
Cover design and digital composite by Diane McIntosh. Cover photos: Background © iStock/Sascha Burkard; inset © iStock/Vinko Murko.
Printed in Canada by Friesens. First printing January 2010.
Paperback ISBN: 978-0-86571-654-4
Inquiries regarding requests to reprint all or part ofHope and Hard Timesshould be addressed to New Society Publishers at the address below.
To order directly from the publishers, please call toll-free (North America) 1-800-567-6772, or order online at www.newsociety.com
Any other inquiries can be directed by mail to: New Society Publishers P.O. Box 189, Gabriola Island, BC V0R 1X0, Canada (250) 247-9737
New Society Publishers’ mission is to publish books that contribute in funda-mental ways to building an ecologically sustainable and just society, and to do so with the least possible impact on the environment, in a manner that models this vision. We are committed to doing this not just through education, but through action. This book is one step toward ending global deforestation and climate change. It is printed on Forest Stewardship Council-certified acid-free paper that is100% post-consumer recycled(100% old growth forest-free), processed chlorine free, and printed with vegetable-based, low-VOC inks, with covers produced using FSC-certified stock. Additionally, New Society purchases carbon offsets based on an annual audit, operating with a carbon-neutral footprint. For further informa-tion, or to browse our full list of books and purchase securely, visit our website at: www.newsociety.com
NEW SOCIETY PUBLISHERS www.newsociety.com
F O R OliviaLynnBernard
A N D I N G R AT E F U L M E M O R Y O F T H E L I F E A N D WO R K O F
Dr.MaryWilderStoertz 1 9 5 8 – 2 0 0 7
Contents
Acknowledgments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ix 1
Part I: Hard Times. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 CHAPTER1. HARDTIMES14. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 The Commons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 The Ecological Way . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 CHAPTER2. STRIVING FORHOME: COMMUNITY, COLLABORATION,ANDSUSTAINABILITY29. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Community . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Collaboration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Sustainability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Part II: The Journey Back. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CHAPTER3. STEPOUTBOLDLY: MONDAYCREEK, OHIO. . . . . . . . . Swiss Cheese and Shotgun Holes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Weaving the Fabric of Community Renewal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Without Justice, It’s Not Sustainable Development . . . . . . . . . Step Out Boldly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CHAPTER4. INTO THEEIGHTHGENERATION: MONHEGANISLAND, MAINE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Island System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A Longer View: Adaptation Over Three Centuries . . . . . . . . . .
43 44 47 49 59 62
64 65 72
Into the Eighth Generation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 Leaving Monhegan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 CHAPTER5. EVERVULNERABLE: THEEASTERNSHORE OFVIRGINIA. . 90 Land Between Two Waters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 Late 20th Century Crises. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 The Shore These Days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 Sweet Life on the Shore . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112 CHAPTER6. MILLENNIA OFRESILIENCE: THEMENOMINEEINDIANS OFWISCONSIN114. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wild Rice People . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118 From Sustained Yield to Sustainability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121 The Second Path . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134 CHAPTER7. GATHERING THEBORDERLANDS: THESKYISLANDS OF THESOUTHWEST138. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mystique of the Borderlands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139 Our Lands in the Belly of the Beast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143 An Expanded Worldview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147 What the Future May Hold. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161 CHAPTER8. HEALINGRELATIONSHIPS, HEALINGLANDSCAPES: THEMATTOLEVALLEY, CALIFORNIA165. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Valley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167 Salmon Going Down. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172 Healing the Watershed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177 Surprises from Beyond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185 CHAPTER9. THEEYES OF THEWORLD AREUPONUS: PLUMASCOUNTY, CALIFORNIA. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 191 Plumas Prequel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 193 A Sense of Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195 Countercurrents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197 Experiential Time: 1997-2009 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199 Ecological Time: The Mountain Maidu. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 209 Looking Back, Looking Forward . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 213 CHAPTER10. BLOWBACK ONSUSTAINABILITY?: CHATTANOOGA, TENNESSEE215. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . City of the River. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 220 Chattanooga 2008 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 223 Piecemeal Progress?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 234
CHAPTER11. ANIMPROBABLEWILDERNESS: SUSTAININGPEOPLE ANDNATURE INCHICAGO237. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Backlash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 239 Chicago Wilderness: Oxymoron or Oxygenation? . . . . . . . . . . 247 Chicago and the Soft Restoration Revolution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 252
Part III: Hope255. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CHAPTER12. RETRACING THEPATH256. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Benchmarks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 257 A Human-Ecological Perspective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 268 How the Stories Stack Up as Resilient Human-Ecological Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 272 CHAPTER13. THESACREDHOOP AND THEGENIUS THATINVENTS THEFUTURE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 281 The Sacred Hoop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 282 The Genius That Invents the Future . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 284 Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 287 Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 313 About the Author . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 325
Acknowledgments
ITHOUT THE ENCOURAGEMENT,SHIATSU TREATMENTS,AND W editorial help of my beautiful mate, Donna Lofgren, I might long ago have succumbed to creative sloth. She merits huzzahs, to say the least. Similarly, in various parts of the country, the Lofgren and Bernard clans need thanks for their nurture of a writer as much in the ozone as in their midst. I would single out Jonathan, James, and Celeste Bernard, my sons and daughter-in-law, who are as compassionate and intellectually alive kinfolk as you could hope to claim and love. I am especially thankful for my long friendship with Jora Young. I want to acknowledge the many ways she has inspired my thinking and writing over the years. I am grateful she gave wholehearted support to this reprise ofThe Ecology of Hope,in which she played so seminal a role. Paul Croce, who rode the waves with me for more than a year, made substantial contributions to three chapters and helped broaden my perspective in many ways. I have also profited more than I can write from the intellectual camaraderie of Rachel Cook, Erin Sykes, and Joe Brehm, who were extraordinary research assistants, and Sonia Marcus, Mark Mason, James Huth, and others in my classes and seminars in the past few years. It has been challenging and rewarding to sojourn with you while working on this project. The folks by far most crucial to my recounting the stories in this book live in nine dispersed communities across the US. When I appeared on their doorsteps they offered warm hospitality, plenty of time to tell their stories, and unfailingly, often in the face of challenging
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