Criminology in Africa
332 Pages
English
Gain access to the library to view online
Learn more
Gain access to the library to view online
Learn more
332 Pages
English

Description

Criminology in Africa has been produced with contributions from leading African authors who have focussed on the various problems facing Africa today regarding crime and criminal justice, and they have, at the same time, put forward their ideas and suggestions for coming to terms with these massive problems.

Subjects

Informations

Published by
Published 29 December 2004
Reads 5
EAN13 9789966031969
Language English
Document size 3 MB

Legal information: rental price per page 0.0062€. This information is given for information only in accordance with current legislation.

Exrait

CRIMINOLOGYINAFRICA
CRIMINOLOGYINAFRICA
Mwene Mushanga Editor
Published by LawAfrica Publishing (K) Ltd. rd Top Plaza, 3 Floor Kindaruma Road, (Off Ngong Road) P.O. Box 4260-00100 GPO Nairobi, Kenya Wireless: +254 20 249 5067 Cell: +254 708 898 189 Fax: +254 20 249 5067
LawAfrica Publishing (U) Ltd Office Suite No. 2 Plot 10A, Jinja Road (Opposite NEMA House) P.O. Box 6198 Kampala, Uganda Phone: +256 41 255808 Fax: +256 41 347743
LawAfrica Publishing (T) Ltd th Co-Architecture Building, 7 Floor India/Makunganya Street P.O. Box 38564 Dar-es-Salaam,Tanzania Phone: +255 22 2120804/5 Fax: +255 22 2120811 Email: sales@lawafrica.com Website: www.lawafrica.com Reprint 2014 © Tibamanya Mwene Mushanga 2011; LawAfrica Revised Edition 2004 First Published 1992 ISBN 9966-031-05-1
Copyright subsists in this work. No part of this work may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or means, or stored in a retrieval system of any nature without the prior publisher’s written permission. Any unauthorized reproduction of this work will constitute a copyright infringement and render the doer liable under both criminal and civil law. Application for permission for use of copyright material including permission to reproduce extracts in other published works shall be made to the publishers. Full acknowledgement of the author, publisher and source must be given. Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that the information published in this work is accurate, the author, the editors, publishers and printers take no responsibility for any loss or damage suffered by any person as a result of reliance upon the information contained herein.
T C ABLE OF ONTENTS
Page Preface to Second Edition............................................................... vii Preface (Ugo Leone) ......................................................................... ix Table of Cases................................................................................. xi Table of Statutes.............................................................................. xiii Introduction (Tibamanya mwene Mushanga1) ......................................
Chapter 1
Traditional, colonial and present-day administration of Criminal Justice (Leonard P. Shaidi)....................................... 13
Chapter 2
Victims of crime and their rights (Ntanda Nsereko) .......................... 35
Chapter 3
Les délais dans l’administration de la justice criminelle de Madagascar (Andrée Ratovonony59) ..........................................
Chapter 4
Twenty years of State violence in Uganda (Tibamanya mwene Mushanga) ................................................... 75
Chapter 5
Corruption in Africa: a case study of Nigeria (Adedokun A. Adeyemi103) .............................................................
Chapter 6
Politique criminelle au Cameroun: essai d’approche d’un modèle de transition (Nathalie Grelet)............................... 127
vi
Chapter 7
Criminology in Africa
Mwene Mushanga
Drug trafficking and drug abuse in Africa (Tolani Asuni)................... 141
Chapter 8
Ritual homicide in Sierra Leone (Muctaru Kabba151) ............................
Chapter 9
The contribution of the labelling theory to the understanding of oppression, conflict and violence in South Africa (Apollo Rwomire181) ......................................................................
Chapter 10
Changements socioculturels et marginalisation des enfants et des jeunes en Afrique subsaharienne (Manga Bekombo193) .....................................................................
Chapter 11
Rural-urban migration and the problems of crime and delinquency (Andargatchew Tesfaye209) .....................................
Chapter 12
Les déviances de subsistance (Elisabeth Michelet) ............................... 221
Chapter 13
Violence as a weapon of the dispossessed (SmitBen F. ) ..................... 243
Chapter 14
Teaching and research network in Africa in the field of criminology (Adewale Rotimi & Olufunmilayo Oloruntimehin)......................... 265 Abstracts ......................................................................................... 281 List of UNSDRI/UNISRI Publications and Staff Papers................. 299 Reference....................................................................................... 305
P S E REFACE TO THE ECOND DITION
It is most fitting that the second issue of Criminology in Africa, first published in Rome in 1992 should be republished in Africa. Crime, like political instability, poverty, hunger, AIDS and dependence continues to be a serious problem in nearly all countries of Africa and especially in fast growing cities such as Kampala, Nairobi, Johannesburg, Kinshasa, Lagos and Abidjan. From very scanty information collected from newspapers, it is evident that crime, especially violent crime, corruption and drug trafficking are experiencing rapid increase but without empirical research, it is not easy to identify some of the contributing factors to this trend. But from what we are able to observe as armchair participant observers of social change in Africa, some of the increase in criminology is a result of: 1. Rapid breakdown of normative socio-cultural and economic order due to the modernisation process. 2. The impact of external forces, facilitated by quick means of communication. 3. Lack of democratic procedures and practices on the part of African leaders. 4. The widening gap between the rich and the poor. 5. Lack of serious commitment to fight and control corruption. 6. Rapid population increase and the extraordinary population growth of cities and towns.
Crimes of violence have become widespread in those countries that are experiencing political upheaval such as the Sudan, Rwanda, Burundi, Uganda, Angola, Sierra Leone.Violence as Professor Smit of South Africa indicated in this book, is used as a weapon by the dispossessed for the amelioration of their conditions.
In several African states, violence is used by the state for its political ends. For example, the governments in Rwanda and Burundi, as well as that in the Sudan, have been using violence over them. Opposition groups in Uganda, in Sierra Leone, and in the Democratic Republic of Congo have been using violence to effect their desired political change. Economic violence is equally
viii
Criminology in Africa
Mwene Mushanga
increasing as armed robberies are becoming a real problem in many countries, sometimes carried out by members of the armed forces not a problem a decade or so ago is now a transnational crime in which some people are becoming professionals.The countries most affected are Mali, Nigeria, South Africa, Zimbabwe and Kenya.This kind of crime will require a concerted effort to control it on the part of police and politicians in affected countries.
P REFACE
Both crime and criminal activities and the organised official approach to counteracting these phenomena are of major concern in the world today.
The international nature of crime and criminal activities requires corresponding action both in terms of national, as well as international co-operation and research activities represent an important contribution to the analysis, policy formulation and evaluation. In view of this, it is important to appreciate the potential of criminological thinking and research for the development of appropriate social and criminal policy, not only within national boundaries, but at the regional and interregional levels.
Within the context of criminology in developing world, account must be taken of the relationship between development and crime. All those involved in criminal justice and socio-economic development are increasingly concerned with the crime-generating influences of development, and for crime prevention/controlling industries and costs, themselves influencing allocation of limited developmental resources and energies. New developmental and criminal justice strategies are needed as well as further development of criminology united with, rather than divorced from, issues of social structure and social change.
In many countries crime rates have grown to such an extent and have reached such proportions that they indicate the presence of a serious threat to sustainable development.The costs of crime in terms of the formulation and implementation of prevention and control policies and the processing of offenders through the criminal justice system place a very heavy strain on fragile economies, while the alarming growth in the phenomenon of juvenile and young adult crime denies nations the manpower necessary to achieve economic and developmental goals.
To further explore these phenomena, the United Nations Interregional Crime and Justice Research Institute (UNICRI), produced and published in 1990 the first volume of a series on