Dictionary of Criminology
240 Pages
English
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Dictionary of Criminology

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Gain access to the library to view online
Learn more
240 Pages
English

Description

In professional disciplines, just as in academics, the definition of basic concepts is fundamental for adequate understanding of issues. A dictionary of criminology may be regarded as irrelevant for the simple reason that criminology cannot be said to constitute an academic or professional discipline in East Africa. But this dictionary is not limited to criminological or sociological concepts alone. Just like any academic discipline, it covers other areas of social studies such as law, economics and politics. The dictionary covers some areas that, to the average reader, are least related to law and crime; but to the specialist, even the least likely entry, like race, tribe and democracy is, in some remote way, linked to the incidence of crime, delinquency or deviance.

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Published 29 December 2011
Reads 1
EAN13 9789966031662
Language English
Document size 3 MB

Legal information: rental price per page 0.0062€. This information is given for information only in accordance with current legislation.

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DICTIONARYOFCRIMINOLOGY
DICTIONARYOFCRIMINOLOGY
Mwene Mushanga
Published by LawAfrica Publishing (U) Ltd Office Suite No. 2 Plot 10A, Jinja Road (Opposite NEMA House) P.O. Box 6198 Kampala, Uganda Phone: +256 41 255808 Fax: +256 41 347743 LawAfrica Publishing (K) Ltd rd Top Plaza, 3 Floor Kindaruma Road, (Off Ngong Road) P.O. Box 4260-00100 GPO Nairobi, Kenya Wireless: +254 20 249 5067 Cell: +254 708 898 189 Fax: +254 20 249 5067 LawAfrica Publishing (T) Ltd th Co-Architecture Building, 7 Floor India/Makunganya Street P.O. Box 38564 Dar-es-Salaam,Tanzania Phone: +255 22 2120804/5 Fax: +255 22 2120811 Email: sales@lawafrica.com Website: www.lawafrica.com © Reprint 2013 © Tibamanya Mwene Mushanga 2011; LawAfrica ISBN 9966-031-06-8
Copyright subsists in this work. No part of this work may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or means, or stored in a retrieval system of any nature without the prior publisher’s written permission. Any unauthorized reproduction of this work will constitute a copyright infringement and render the doer liable under both criminal and civil law. Application for permission for use of copyright material including permission to reproduce extracts in other published works shall be made to the publishers. Full acknowledgement of the author, publisher and source must be given. Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that the information published in this work is accurate, the author, the editors, publishers and printers take no responsibility for any loss or damage suffered by any person as a result of reliance upon the information contained herein.
T C ABLE OF ONTENTS
Introduction ................................................................................. Acknowledgement........................................................................ Preface ......................................................................................... Table of Cases............................................................................... A .......................................................................................... B .......................................................................................... C .......................................................................................... D .......................................................................................... E .......................................................................................... F .......................................................................................... G .......................................................................................... H .......................................................................................... I .......................................................................................... J .......................................................................................... K .......................................................................................... L .......................................................................................... M .......................................................................................... N .......................................................................................... O .......................................................................................... P .......................................................................................... Q .......................................................................................... R .......................................................................................... S .......................................................................................... T .......................................................................................... U .......................................................................................... V ..........................................................................................
Page vii ix xi xiii 1 21 29 55 71 79 89 93 101 109 113 115 127 139 143 147 158 161 169 189 197 199
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I NTRODUCTION
In professional disciplines, just as in academics, the definition of basic concepts is fundamental for adequate understanding of issues. A dictionary of criminology may be regarded as irrelevant for the simple reason that criminology cannot be said to constitute an academic or professional discipline in East Africa. But this dictionary is not limited to criminological or sociological concepts alone. Just like any academic discipline, it covers other areas of social studies such as law, economics and politics. The dictionary covers some areas that, to the average reader, are least related to law and crime; but to the specialist, even the least likely entry, like race, tribe and democracy is, in some remote way, linked to the incidence of crime, delinquency or deviance. I am aware that eyebrows will be raised in some legal circles for inclusion of some of these entries, but I believe that an interdisciplinary approach to social issues is an inevitable development, for in the world we live nothing is independent of other areas of human existence. The economic system affects politics, as it does health or education; the legal system is influenced by culture or education; and the religious aspects of the people concerned.
My interest in compiling this dictionary was to provide the student, the government official, those without legal training, the desk worker, or the professional legal consultant with a simplified text to which to refer for easy reference.
I must confess that I am thoroughly dissatisfied with the state of our knowledge, especially with the educated members of our society. We have a tendency to believe that if you are not a doctor of medicine you are not expected to know what a caesarian section or Hodgkin’s lymphoma is; or that if you are not a lawyer you need not know whatharbeas corpusor the difference between rape is and statutory rape. What we need to accept as time goes on, is that the monopoly of skills and technical know-how will remain the monopoly of the professionals, but the general public has the right to know what goes on in professional circles; for no one has a right
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Mwene Mushanga
to the monopoly of knowledge. It is said that a little knowledge is dangerous, but no knowledge at all is definitely more dangerous.
I have included some commonly used abbreviations that bothered me earlier in my academic life, words like e.g., viz, ibid., ergo, etc.The average reader comes across these brief words but may not readily know what they stand for. One could ask why some entries have brief definitions while others have longer descriptive definitions. This is because some words or concepts are considered to be less well understood, or because of their social, economic or legal importance they need detailed definitions than others. For example, to explain how an individual gradually develops to become a criminal needs more explanation than the concept of abandon; the rule of law needs more explanation than arson. I have also included a few names of eminent scholars who have made enormous contributions to the study of crime, criminology, law and related disciplines, among whom are Lombroso, Garofalo, Sutherland, Sellin, Marx, Clinard,Wolfgang and others.
It is self-evident that without the contribution of such outstanding persons, criminology would not have grown to be the academic discipline and profession that it is today.
In compiling this dictionary, I have made use of a number of sources, textbooks of sociology, law, criminal justice, psychiatry and philosophy and, where appropriate, these sources have been indicated at the end of the relevant entry.
Mwene Mushanga Kabwohe, 2007
ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
My gratitude goes to my son Ndyabarema Mushanga, himself a lawyer, who did some editing, made comments on legal concepts and contributed some entries; and Miss Enid Kuribatura, secretary at Itendero Secondary School, who typed the manuscript; she had a hard time deciphering my handwriting, made worse by the fact that I only have 25 percent vision in both eyes.
Prof. Marshall B. Clinard, American elder brother, friend and teacher, himself an eminent scholar and distinguished professor of sociology and criminology at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, has been a source of inspiration and encouragement for the last forty years. HisSociology of Deviant Behavior, together with Robert F. Meier, which I first read as an undergraduate at Makerere, has been th published for half a century and is now in its 11 edition; hisCrime in Developing Countries, together with Daniel J. Abbott, based on research done in Uganda in the 1960s, is an excellent contribution to the study of crime in developing countries, and hisCorporate CrimeYeager, is with Peter C. Professoralready a classic. , together Clinard’s contribution in the field of criminology ranks as high as that of Sutherland, Sellin, Mannheim and others. Professor Clinard wrote the introduction to my bookCriminal Homicide in Ugandain 1974. I cherish our association.
Lastly, I want to thank my wife, Mama Muko, for her continued interest in my paperwork. I owe her a great deal.
Mwene Mushanga Kabwohe, 2007