Practice and Procedure in Civil Matters in the Courts of Records in Anglophone Cameroon
308 Pages
English
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Practice and Procedure in Civil Matters in the Courts of Records in Anglophone Cameroon

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Gain access to the library to view online
Learn more
308 Pages
English

Description

This book, the first of its kind on Anglophone Cameroon, brings significant local context into the practice of law particularly at a juncture when civil practice has been radically altered by Cameroon�s ongoing effort at harmonization of both the substantive and procedural laws applicable in the courts. The book covers a wide spectrum of topics including: the commencement of civil actions, jurisdiction, simplified recovery procedures and measures of execution, provisional execution and stay of execution. It provides a detailed analysis of the relevant rules of court applicable in both the high court and court of appeal. One of its major strengths lies in its use of recent cases to demonstrate the way Cameroonian judges have dealt with local procedural laws, as well as how the differences between Cameroonian indigenous rules of practice and those imported particularly from Nigeria and England are reconciled.

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Published 11 May 2015
Reads 4
EAN13 9789956762491
Language English
Document size 1 MB

Legal information: rental price per page 0.0078€. This information is given for information only in accordance with current legislation.

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PRACTICE & PROCEDURE IN CIVIL MATTERS IN THE COURTS OF RECORDS IN ANGLOPHONE CAMEROON
Michael A. Yanou
Practice & Procedure in Civil Matters in the Courts of Records in Anglophone Cameroon Michael A. Yanou Langaa Research & Publishing CIG Mankon, Bamenda
Publisher: LangaaRPCIG Langaa Research & Publishing Common Initiative Group P.O. Box 902 Mankon Bamenda North West Region Cameroon Langaagrp@gmail.comwww.langaa-rpcig.net Distributed in and outside N. America by African Books Collective orders@africanbookscollective.com www.africanbookscollective.com ISBN: 9956-792-59-4 ©2015Michael A. Yanou
DISCLAIMER All views expressed in this publication are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of Langaa RPCIG.
Dedication
This book is dedicated to my wonderful wife Mrs Nicholine Musi Yanou and lovely children Masters Michael Lobga Yanou, Dave Tchami Yanou and Dani Yanou.
Table of Contents Acknowledgement…....…………………………………… vii Preface……………………………………………………. ix Foreword…………………………………………...…….. xi Table of Cases…………………………………………….. xiii Chapter 1: General Introduction………………………...1Chapter 2: Commencements of Civil Actions in the High Courts…………………………………………………… 9 Introduction……………………………………………… 9 Cause of action…………………………………………….9 Modes of Commencing of Civil Action……………………11 Writs of Summons………………………………………... 11 Alternative Procedure for Claims………………………… 14 Alternative Procedure or Originating Summons………….. 15 Commencing Probate Actions……………………………. 20 Revocation-Procedure…………………………………….. 21 Motions……………………………………………………22 Petitions…………………………………………………... 25 Commencement of Labour Actions………………………. 26 Irregularity in the commencement of action………………. 29 Chapter 3: Jurisdiction…………………………………..31 Jurisdiction over administrative Acts: a procedural perspective……………………………………..33 Jurisdiction and Condition Precedent……………………... 37 Chapter 4: Actions Brought Under the Simplified Recovery Procedures Measures of Enforcement of the OHADA Uniform Act…………………………………...41 Introduction……………………………………………… 41 Recovery of debt or Property……………………………... 41 iii
Recovery of Monetary Claims…………………………….. 43 Action to Recover Property………………………………..46 Procedure………………………………………………….46 Procedure for Actions involving ships…………………….. 48 Chapter 5: Parties………………………………………..51 Objections with Regards To Party…………………………53 Interpleader Proceedings………………………………….. 56 Suit in a Representative Action…………………………….56 Locus Standi………………………………………………...59Chapter 6: Intervener Proceedings……………………...61 Third Party Proceedings………………………………….. 61 Joinder of Parties…………………………………………. 62 Chapter 7: Appearance…………………………………..69 Default of Appearance……………………………………. 70 Absconding defendant……………………………………..73 Conditional appearance…………………………………… 75 Chapter 8: Venue………………………………………...79 Transfer of Suit to Different Judicial Divisions…………… 82 Chapter 9: Hearings………………………………………85 Dealing with documentary evidence………………………...89 Notice to produce…………………………………………..89 Interrogatories……………………………………………....91 Affidavit Evidence & Documents: a procedural perspective...92 Hearsay Rules………………………………………………95 Expert……………………………………………………....97 Chapter 10: Service of Process…………………………..101 Introduction………………………………………………101 Irregular service…………………………………………...104 Substituted Service………………………………………..106 iv
Chapter 11: Pleadings………………………………….111 Principal Character of Proceedings………………………111 Rules of Pleadings………………………………………. 114 Statement of Claim………………………………………115 Contents of a Statement of Claim………………………..116 Statement of Defence……………………………………119 Matters Which Must be specifically pleaded…………….. 122 Chapter 12: Amendments……………………………...125 Chapter 13: Preliminary applications…………………129 Applying For Injunctive Orders………………………… 134 Procedure for applying for injunction…………………... 135 Interlocutory Injunction: Procedural Issues……………... 138 Principles for grant of injunctions……………………… 141 Serious question to be tried…………………………….. 142 Adequacy of dangers to the applicant…………………… 142 Balance of convenience…………………………………. 143 Status Quo……………………………………………… 144 Chapter 14: Judgments…………………………………145 Courts Bound by the case brought by the parties……….. 146 Non Suit………………………………………………... 152 Chapter 15: Appeals……………………………………155 Time for Filling Appeals & Extension of Time to Appeal…………………………………………………... 157 Place for filling appeals…………………………………. 159 Conditions of appeal…………………………………… 160 Leave of court to file appeals against interlocutory order……………………………………………………. 163 Nature of grounds of appeal…………………………….165 Appeals operate to stay execution………………………..167 Labour appeals…………………………………………. 169 Appeal on Points of Law and Fact……………………… 170 v
Interlocutory Applications in the Court of Appeal……… 174 Further Evidence on Appeal…………………………… 176 Striking out and relisting appeals……………………….. 177 Chapter 16: Garnishe Orders and Stay of Execution 181 Garnishe Orders………………………………………... 181 Conditions for the adoption of garnishee proceedings…...182 Procedure for garnishee proceedings……………………. 183 Provisional Execution…………………………………... 185 Stay of Execution……………………………………….. 192 Supreme Court Civil Procedure Rules………………...195
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Acknowledgements As always, I must express my immeasurable gratitude to the Lord Jesus Christ for inspiring and sustaining me through the course of writing this book. Indeed, it is to the Lord’s undeserved grace that I owe all I have accomplished in legal practice and academics. This book would off-course at the practical level not have seen the light of day without the assistance of many some of whom have for purposes of inadequacy of space not been expressly acknowledged here. I thank all that have contributed in one way or the other in making this book project a success. My gratitude goes to all the judges who delivered the judgments that have been used in this book. I, in this regard pay special homage to Justices Martin Mbeng, B.B Bawak of blessed memory, A. N Njie, A K Nana, Mbah Acha etc. The insightful comments of Justice Mbeng in particular contributed in improving the standard of this book. I must also thank Justice Leslie Forbang of the Fako High Court who apart from also delivering some of the decisions analyzed in this book assisted me in editing the work. The brilliant legal submissions of resourceful counsel like Messrs Eta Besong Junior, Peter Tumnde, Gilbert Tanguyi, Bonu Innocent, Sama Francis, Gilbert Abunaw, Jude Kumfa, Francis Bache and Eyambe Ebai did help give interesting perspectives to this book. My colleagues in chambers and academics also deserve my sincere appreciation. I should in this regard express my indebtedness to Barristers, Vincent Fossung, Anthony Tchana Yanou, Rudolf Takem and Enjema Mafany whose wonderful co-operation made the Shalom Legal Consultant firm Buea which I head a warm family setting conducive for the kind that of research leading to this book. I must also extend my gratitude to my colleagues (Prof. Martha Tumnde, Prof. Jonie Fonyam, Dr Emmanuel Ekome, Dr Patience Sone, Dr Alvine vii