Professional Ethics: A Kenyan Perspective

-

English
218 Pages
Read an excerpt
Gain access to the library to view online
Learn more

Description

Six chapters include: A General Overview of Professional Ethics; The Legal Profession and the Kenyan System; Advocate-Client Relationship; Unqualified Persons Acting as Advocates; Remuneration of Advocates; Professional Misconduct and Offences by Advocates

Subjects

Informations

Published by
Published 29 December 2011
Reads 0
EAN13 9789966031747
Language English
Document size 4 MB

Legal information: rental price per page 0.0048€. This information is given for information only in accordance with current legislation.

Report a problem
PROFESSIONALETHICS A Kenyan Perspective
PROFESSIONALETHICS A Kenyan Perspective Prof.Tom Ojienda & Katarina Juma
Published by LawAfrica Publishing (K) Ltd rd Top Plaza, 3 Floor Kindaruma Road (Off Ngong Road) P.O. Box 4260 - 00100 GPO Nairobi, Kenya Wireless: +254 20 2495067 Cell: +254 708 898 189 Fax: +254 20 2495067
LawAfrica Publishing (U) Ltd Office Suite No. 2 Plot 10A, Jinja Road (Opposite NEMA House) P.O. Box 6198 Kampala, Uganda Phone: +256 41 255808 Fax: +256 41 347743
LawAfrica Publishing (T) Ltd th Co-Architecture Building, 7 Floor India/Makunganya Street P.O. Box 38564 Dar-es-Salaam,Tanzania Phone: +255 22 2120804/5 Fax: +255 22 2120811 Email: sales@lawafrica.com Website: www.lawafrica.com
© Prof.Tom Ojienda & Katarina Juma 2011;LawAfrica
ISBN 9966-031-20-4
Copyright subsists in this work. No part of this work may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or means, or stored in a retrieval system of any nature without the prior publisher’s written permission. Any unauthorized reproduction of this work will constitute a copyright infringement and render the doer liable under both criminal and civil law.
Application for permission for use of copyright material including permission to reproduce extracts in other published works shall be made to the publishers. Full acknowledgement of the author, publisher and source must be given.
Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that the information published in this work is accurate, the author, the editors, publishers and printers take no responsibility for any loss or damage suffered by any person as a result of reliance upon the information contained herein.
TABLEOFCONTENTS
Table of Cases..................................................................... Table of Statutes..................................................................
Page ix xi
Chapter 1 A General Overview of Professional Ethics ............................ 1 A. Fundamental Issues .................................................... 1 B. The Profession ........................................................... 3 C. Characteristics of a Profession .................................... 5 D. Ethics and the Legal Profession .................................. 9 E. Professional Ethics and Professional Responsibility ..... 11 F. Sources of Ethical Obligations in the Legal Profession .................................................................. 12 G. Relationship between Professional Ethics and Other Branches of Law ........................................................ 13 H. Conclusion ................................................................ 15
Chapter 2 The Legal Profession and the Kenyan System ......................... 17 A. Introductory Remarks ............................................... 17 B. Composition of the Legal Profession in Kenya ........... 18 C. Regulation of the Legal Profession in Kenya .............. 20 D. Disciplinary Machinery/ Institutions for Lawyers in Kenya ........................................................................ 27 E. The Declining Ethical Standards in Kenya .................. 27 F. Effective Enforcement Mechanism for Ethics in Kenya ........................................................................ 29
vi
Prof. Tom Ojienda & Katarina Juma Professional Ethics: A Kenyan Perspective
Chapter 3 Advocate-Client Relationship................................................ A. The Advocate [ss. 2 - 43]............................................ B. The Client [ss. 2, 60A(7)] ........................................... C. Creation of Advocate-Client Relationship.................. D. The Nature of the Advocate-Client Relationship ....... E. Rights, Obligations and Privileges of the Advocate ..... F. Conflicting Obligations.............................................. G. Conflict of Interests ................................................... H. Advocates and Professional Undertakings ...................
Chapter 4 Unqualified Persons Acting as Advocates ................................ A. Unqualified Persons are not Advocates [s. 31] ............. B. When to Practice on Own Behalf [ss. 32 - 33] ........... C. Consequences of Acting as Advocate when Unqualified [ss. 33 - 34] ............................................. D. The Name and Address of the Drawer of a Document or an Instrument ......................................
Chapter 5 Remuneration of Advocates ................................................... A. Advocate Fees ............................................................ B. Factors that Determine the Fees Charged................... C. Fee Agreements and Conflict of Interests.................... D. Remuneration Agreements [s. 45] .............................. E. Invalid Agreements Act [s. 46] .................................... F. The (Advocates) Remuneration Order [ss. 44, 48] ...... G. Retainer Agreements ................................................. H. Authority on Fees and Recovery of Fees by the Advocate .........................................................
31 31 42 43 44 46 58 60 62
65 65 65
67
72
75 75 75 76 77 79 80 86
88
Prof. Tom Ojienda & Katarina Juma Table of Contents
I.
Enforcing Fee Agreements [ss. 51, 52].........................
vii
89
Chapter 6 Professional Misconduct and Offences by Advocates............... 93 A. Introduction .............................................................. 93 B. Failure to Endorse the Name of an Advocate on an Instrument [s. 35]....................................................... 94 C. Prohibition against Undercutting [s. 36] ..................... 94 D. Prohibition against Sharing Profits [s. 37] ................... 96 E. Prohibition against Advertising and Touting [s. 38]...... 97 F. Acting as an Agent for Unqualified Person [ss. 39 - 40] ................................................................ 99 G. Employment of Persons Struck off the Roll or Suspended [ss. 41 - 42]........................................... 100 H. Advocates employed by Non Legal Employers............ 101
Annextures Annexture 1:The Law Society of Kenya Digest of Professional Conduct and Etiquette (2000)......... 103 Annexture 2:The Advocates (Continuing Legal Education) Regulations 2004............................................... 129 Annexture 3:The Advocates (Professional Indemnity) Regulations 2004 .................................................................. 135 Annexture 4:The Advocates (Practice) Rules (Cap 16, Laws of Kenya) .................................... 137 Annexture 5:The Advocates (Remuneration) Order (S 48 Cap 15 Kenya) .......................................... 141 Annexture 6:The Advocates (Deposit Interest) Rules (Cap 16, Laws of Kenya) .................................... 169 Annexture 7:The Advocates (Professional Conduct) Regulations, (1977, Uganda) .............................. 171 Annexture 8:The Advocates (Disciplinary) Rules of 1955 (Laws of Tanzania).............................................. 181 Bibliography .......................................................................... 195
“A section of the legal fraternity is adopting a tendency of more than belligerent advocacy, if such a term may be used, employing such language which in effect amounts to insulting and abusing judges on a personal level in the course of representing a client. It cannot be said that a client can and does instruct a lawyer to insult a judge or indeed any judicial officer. Such advocacy is demeaning. Incidents are known where an advocate engages in such conduct coming complete with discourtesy, slurs, theatrics and antics. Insulting a judge by whatever language neither advances the cause being argued nor improves one’s character.”
As per the Court inAaron Gitonga Ringera and 3 others v Paul Muite and 10 others1330 ofHigh Court Civil Suit No. , Nairobi 1991