Universal Declaration of Human Rights: English, French, Hausa, Igbo and Yoruba

Universal Declaration of Human Rights: English, French, Hausa, Igbo and Yoruba

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English
56 Pages

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The ‘Universal Declaration of Human Rights’ does not of course aspire to the mystification tendencies of most ideological tracts — including the religious. It is a straightforward, humanist statement of rights, one that is transcendental only in the sense that it does transcend all ideological and religious detractions from the worth of man, woman and child as the fundamental unit of culture, productivity and indeed, civilisation. It therefore deserves far greater dissemination than it tends to receive — that is, it requires no intermediaries — as is the case with secular and religious scriptures — since it speaks directly and universally to humanity. All that this document requires therefore is simply that it be rendered in all the accessible languages of all societies; then let every sentient member of society weigh its claims against the excuses of dictatorships, intolerance, discrimination against the opportunisms and naked lust for power and domination by a minority within societies, against even the fundamentalist terror of the religious kind that is fast’ replacing the state terror of discredited and yet surviving ideologies. Then, perhaps, irrespective of race, faith, or sex, humanity in every corner of the world will begin to understand how much it has lost in its goal of self-realisation, and how much it yet stands to lose.


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Published 21 February 2013
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EAN13 9791092312126
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Universal Declaration of Human Rights: English, French, Hausa, Igbo and Yoruba

Foreword by Wole Soyinka

  • Publisher: Institut français de recherche en Afrique
  • Year of publication: 1993
  • Published on OpenEdition Books: 21 February 2013
  • Serie: Afriques, langues, histoire et arts
  • Electronic ISBN: 9791092312126

OpenEdition Books

http://books.openedition.org

Printed version
  • ISBN: 9789782015266
  • Number of pages: 56
 
Electronic reference

. Universal Declaration of Human Rights: English, French, Hausa, Igbo and Yoruba: Foreword by Wole Soyinka. New edition [online]. Ibadan: Institut français de recherche en Afrique, 1993 (generated 18 December 2014). Available on the Internet: <http://books.openedition.org/ifra/432>. ISBN: 9791092312126.

This text was automatically generated on 18 December 2014. It is the result of an OCR (optical character recognition) scanning.

© Institut français de recherche en Afrique, 1993

Terms of use:
http://www.openedition.org/6540

Table of contents
  1. Acknowledgements

  1. Foreword

    Wole Soyinka
  2. Universal Declaration of Human Rights

    1. PREAMBLE
    2. NOW, THEREFORE,
  3. Déclaration Universelle des Droits de l’Homme

  4. Sanarwar Kasashen Duniya Game da Hakkiin Yan-Adam

  5. Nkuwuwaputa Uwa Nile Banyere Ikike Mmadu Nwegasiri

  6. Ikede Kariaye fun Eto Omoniyan

Acknowledgements

1We would like to acknowledge the help received by the various people who assisted in the production of this book.

2Special thanks go to the teams of unversity dons, in both France and Nigeria who worked on the translation of the original English and French texts into Hausa, Igbo and Yoruba. Also acknowledged is the assistance to the translators of members of the French NGO, Diffusion Multilingue de la Déclaration Universelle des Droits de l'Homme, which assisted the translators, and the Agence de Coopération Culturelle et Technique which funded some of the translations.

Foreword

Wole Soyinka

1At the height of a campaign to make Kishwahili the common language for the black African continent, I was asked — by a very committed ideologue — just what contribution such a language policy distraction had to offer to the far more urgent revolutionary struggle of African neo-colonial societies.

2That was easy enough. "For one thing", I replied, "it would put an end to the mystification which is constantly embedded in the very kind of question you have posed. It will compel you to define, in a language accessible to all, what you mean when you speak of a ‘comprador’ class to an African audience; when you dismiss your intellectual opponents as ‘revisionists’, which not only makes further dialogue with them beneath your intellect, but justifies their liquidation; it would compel you to show your listeners where you found ‘kulaks’ in the heart of Africa, thus dismissing them as deserving no less than a ‘Stalinist solution’ְ. ... in short, you would be left no option but to narrate, in a language that is accessible to your society, why ‘Marxist-Leninism’ in the ‘socialist’ dispensation of Mengistu’s Ethiopia aspires to the same level of torture, secret executions, arbitrary detentions and other refinements in social dehumanisation as the ‘comprador-capitalism’ of Mobutu Sese Seko’s Zaire, or Hastings Banda’s Malawi".

3The ‘Universal Declaration of Human Rights’ does not of course aspire to the mystification tendencies of most ideological tracts — including the religious. It is a straightforward, humanist statement of rights, one that is transcendental only in the sense that it does transcend all ideological and religious detractions from the worth of man, woman and child as the fundamental unit of culture, productivity and indeed, civilisation. It therefore deserves far greater dissemination than it tends to receive — that is, it requires no intermediaries — as is the case with secular and religious scriptures — since it speaks directly and universally to humanity.

4All that this document requires therefore is simply that it be rendered in all the accessible languages of all societies; then let every sentient member of society weigh its claims against the excuses of dictatorships, intolerance, discrimination against the opportunisms and naked lust for power and domination by a minority within societies, against even the fundamentalist terror of the religious kind that is fast’ replacing the state terror of discredited and yet surviving ideologies.

5Then, perhaps, irrespective of race, faith, or sex, humanity in every corner of the world will begin to understand how much it has lost in its goal of self-realisation, and how much it yet stands to lose.

Universal Declaration of Human Rights

PREAMBLE

1Whereas recognition of the inherent dignity and of the equal and inalienable rights of all members of the human family is the foundation of freedom justice and peace in the world.

2Whereas disregard and contempt for human rights have resulted in barbarous acts which have outraged the conscience of mankind, and the advent of a world in which human beings shall enjoy freedom of speech and belief and freedom from fear and want has been proclaimed as the highest aspiration of the common people.

3Whereas it is essential, if man is not to be compelled to have recourse, as a last resort, to rebellion against tyranny and oppression, that human rights should be protected by the rule of law.

4Whereas it is essential to promote the development of friendly relations between nations.

5Whereas the peoples of the United Nations have in the Charter reaffirmed their faith in fundamental human rights, in the dignity and worth of the human person and in the equal rights of men and women and have determined to promote social progress and better standards of life in larger freedom.

6Whereas Member States have pledged themselves to achieve, in cooperation with the United Nations, the promotion of universal respect for and observance of human rights and fundamental freedoms.

7Whereas a common understanding of these rights and freedoms is of the greatest importance for the full realization of this pledge.

NOW, THEREFORE,

8The General Assembly

9Proclaims this Universal Declaration of Human Rights as a common standard of achievement for all peoples and all nations, to the end that every individual and every organ of society, keeping this Declaration in mind, shall strive by teaching and education to promote respect for these rights and freedoms and by progressive measures, national and international, to secure their universal and effective recognition and observance, both among the peoples of Member States themselves and among the peoples of territories under their jurisdiction.

Article 1

10All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights. They are endowed with reason and conscience and should act towards one another in a spirit of brotherhood.

Article 2

11Everyone is entitled to all the rights and freedoms set forth in this Declaration, without distinction of any kind, such as race, colour, sex, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, property, birth or other status.

12Furthermore, no distinction shall be made on the basis of the political, jurisdictional or international status of the country or territory to which a person belongs, whether it be independent, trust, non-self-governing or under...