Writing Spaces 1

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Volumes in Writing Spaces: Readings on Writing offer multiple perspectives on a wide-range of topics about writing, much like the model made famous by Wendy Bishop’s “The Subject Is . . .” series. In each chapter, authors present their unique views, insights, and strategies for writing by addressing the undergraduate reader directly. Drawing on their own experiences, these teachers-as-writers invite students to join in the larger conversation about developing nearly every aspect of craft of writing. Consequently, each essay functions as a standalone text that can easily complement other selected readings in writing or writing-intensive courses across the disciplines at any level. Topics in Volume 1 of the series include academic writing, how to interpret writing assignments, motives for writing, rhetorical analysis, revision, invention, writing centers, argumentation, narrative, reflective writing, Wikipedia, patchwriting, collaboration, and genres.

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Published 18 June 2010
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EAN13 9781602351851
Language English
Document size 2 MB

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writing Voumes înWriIng Spaces: Readings on WriIng oer muïpe perspecïves on a wîde-range of opîcs abou wrîïng, much îke he mode made famous by Wendy Bîshop’s “The Subjec Is . . .” serîes. In each chaper, auhors presen heîr unîque vîews, însîghs, and sraegîes for wrîïng by addressîng he undergraduae reader dîrecy. Drawîng on heîr own experîences, hese eachers-as-wrîers învîe sudens o joîn în he arger conversaïon abou deveopîng neary every aspec of crat of wrîïng. Consequeny, each essay funcïons as a sandaone ex ha can easîy compemen oher seeced readîngs în wrîïng or wrîïng-înensîve courses across he dîscîpînes a any eve.
Topîcs în Voume 1 of he serîes încude academîc wrîïng, how o înerpre wrîïng assîgnmens, moïves for wrîïng, rheorîca anaysîs, revîsîon, învenïon, wrîïng ceners, argumenaïon, narraïve, relecïve wrîïng, Wîkîpedîa, pachwrîïng, coaboraïon, and genres.
A voumes în he serîes are pubîshed under a Creaïve Commons îcense and avaîabe for downoad a he Wrîïng Spaces websîe (hp://www.wrîïngspaces. org), Paror Press (hp://www.parorpress.com), and he WAC Cearînghouse (hp://wac.coosae.edu/).
Chares Lowe îs Assîsan Professor of Wrîïng a Grand Vaey Sae Unîversîy where he eachers composîïon, professîona wrîïng, and Web desîgn. Pave Zemîansky îs Assocîae Professor în he Schoo of Wrîïng, Rheorîc, and Technîca Communîcaïon a James Madîson Unîversîy.
writing spaces series editors, Charles Lowe and Pavel Zemliansky www.writingspaces.org
816 Robînson Sree Wes Lafayee, IN 47906 www.parorpress.com S A N: 2 5 4 - 8 8 7 9 ISBN 978-1-60235-185-1
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from opîc o presenaïon . wrîïng ceners . învenïon as înquîry based earnîng . pachwrîïng . soryeîng. voîce . Wîkîpedîa research . ehnography . navîgaïng genres . irs person . coaboraïve wrîïng . rheorîcaanaysîs . academîc wrîïng . revîsîon . ehîca învenïon. phîosophîes of error . învenïon and învesmen . rheorîcawritingspreadingcs onewrs occasîon and vocabuary . irs-year wrîïng . ogîc în argumenaïve wrîïng . myh of he înspîred wrîer . înner and ouer reaîïes durîng învenïon . relecïvewrîïng . cîaïon as rheorîca pracïce . buîdîng an argumeniting volume 1
edited by charles lowe and pavel zemliansky
W S: R  W Series Editors, Charles Lowe and Pavel Zemliansky
W S: R  W Series Editors, Charles Lowe and Pavel Zemliansky
Volumes inWriting Spaces: Readings on Writingoffer multiple perspec-tives on a wide-range of topics about writing, much like the model made famous by Wendy Bishop’s “The Subject Is . . .” series. In each chapter, authors present their unique views, insights, and strategies for writing by addressing the undergraduate reader directly. Drawing on their own experiences, these teachers-as-writers invite students to join in the larger conversation about developing nearly every aspect of the craft of writing. Consequently, each essay functions as a standalone text that can easily complement other selected readings in writing or writing-intensive courses across the disciplines at any level.
Writing Spaces
ReadingsonWriting Volume 1
Edited by Charles Lowe and Pavel Zemliansky
Parlor Press West Lafayette, Indiana www.parlorpress.com
Parlor Press LLC, West Lafayette, Indiana 47906
© 2010 by Parlor Press. Individual essays © 2010 by the respective au-thors. Unless otherwise stated, these works are licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License and are subject to the Writing Spaces Terms of Use. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/us/ or send a letter to Creative Commons, 171 Second Street, Suite 300, San Francisco, California, 94105, USA. To view the Writing Spaces Terms of Use, visit http://writingspaces.org/terms-of-use. All rights reserved.
Printed in the United States of America S A N: 2 5 4 - 8 8 7 9
Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data
Writing spaces : readings on writing. Volume 1 / edited by Charles Lowe and Pavel Zemliansky.  p. cm. Includes bibliographical references and index. ISBN 978-1-60235-184-4 (pbk. : alk. paper) -- ISBN 978-1-60235-185-1 (adobe ebook) 1. College readers. 2. English language--Rhetoric. I. Lowe, Charles, 1965- II. Zemliansky, Pavel. PE1417.W735 2010 808’.0427--dc22  2010019487
Cover design by Colin Charlton. This book is printed on acid-free paper.
Parlor Press, LLC is an independent publisher of scholarly and trade titles in print and multimedia formats. This book is available in paperback, cloth, and Adobe eBook formats from Parlor Press on the World Wide Web at http://www.parlorpress.com. For submission information or to find out about Parlor Press publications, write to Parlor Press, 816 Robinson St., West Lafayette, Indiana, 47906, or e-mail editor@parlorpress.com.
For Wendy Bishop
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Contents
Acknowledgmentsix Introduction: Open Source Composition Texts Arrive for College Writersxi Robert E. Cummings
What Is “Academic” Writing?3 L. Lennie Irvin
So You’ve Got a Writing Assignment. Now What?18 Corrine E. Hinton
The Inspired Writer vs. the Real Writer34 Sarah Allen
Backpacks vs. Briefcases: Steps toward Rhetorical Analysis45 Laura Bolin Carroll
From Topic to Presentation: Making Choices toDevelopYourWriting59 Beth L. Hewett
Taking Flight: Connecting Inner and Outer Realities during Invention82 Susan E. Antlitz
Reinventing Invention: Discovery and InvestmentinWriting107 Michelle D. Trim and Megan Lynn Isaac
“Finding Your Way In”: Invention as Inquiry Based Learning in First Year Writing126 Steven Lessner and Collin Craig
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WhyVisitYourCampusWritingCenter?Ben Rafoth
Finding the Good Argument OR Why Bother With Logic?156 Rebecca Jones
“I need you to say ‘I’”: Why First Person Is Important in College Writing180 Kate McKinney Maddalena
Reflective Writing and the Revision Process: What Were You Thinking?191 Sandra L. Giles
Wikipedia Is Good for You!?205 James P. Purdy
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Contents
Composing the Anthology: An Exercise in Patchwriting225 Christopher Leary
Collaborating Online: Digital Strategies for Group Work235 Anthony T. Atkins
Navigating Genres249 Kerry Dirk
Contributors263 Index267
Acknowledgments
When we began discussing the possibility of a project likeWriting Spaces, almost two years ago, we immediately thought that we’d like it to resemble Wendy Bishop’s unique series “The Subject Is . . .” in approach, style, and tone. As we publish the first volume ofWriting Spaces, we pay tribute to Wendy’s work and to the influence she has had on us. We were privileged to participate in “The Subject Is . . .” series, one as a co-editor, the other—as a contributor. We remember being intrigued by the possibility of essays, which spoke to students and teachers alike, illuminating complex topics in an accessible man-ner. We also remember reading “The Subject Is . . .” books, assigning them to our first-year writers, and hearing a somewhat-surprised “this is pretty good for a textbook” reaction from them. Like Wendy’s series,Writing Spacescould not exist without the col-laborative efforts of so many in our field, all teachers of writing who were, at one time, writing students as well. We appreciate the hard work and patience of our editorial board members in reviewing the chapters of this collection, and they deserve an extra special thanks from us for the helpful revision strategies and encouragement they pro-vided the authors of this volume: Linda Adler-Kassner, Chris Anson, Stephen Bernhardt, Glenn Blalock, Bradley Bleck, Robert Cummings, Peter Dorman, Douglas Eyman, Alexis Hart, Jim Kalmbach, Judith Kirkpatrick, Carrie Lamanna, Carrie Leverenz, Christina McDonald, Joan Mullin, Dan Melzer, Nancy Myers, Mike Palmquist, James Por-ter, Clancy Ratliff, Keith Rhodes, Kirk St. Amant, and Christopher Thaiss. To our Assistant Editors, Craig Hulst and Terra Williams, and our Graphics Editor, Colin Charlton: this collection is indebted to you for the ideas that you contributed in its genesis and production, and the many hours you spent working to prepare the manuscripts. Thanks to Richard Haswell for the help he gave in reading all of the drafts and tagging them with the keyword system implemented on CompPile. And finally to David Blakesley, thanks for your support in publishing the print edition through Parlor Press, and the many great ideas and feedback that you always contribute to a project.
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