A complete practical grammar of the Hungarian language; with exercises, selections from the best authors, and vocabularies, to which is added a Historical sketch of Hungarian literature
504 Pages
English
Downloading requires you to have access to the YouScribe library
Learn all about the services we offer

A complete practical grammar of the Hungarian language; with exercises, selections from the best authors, and vocabularies, to which is added a Historical sketch of Hungarian literature

-

Downloading requires you to have access to the YouScribe library
Learn all about the services we offer
504 Pages
English

Description

A COMPLETEPRACTICAL GRAMMARTHEOFHUNGARIAN LANGUAGE,WITHSELECTIONS FROM THE BESTEXERCISES, AUTHORS,AND VOCABULARIES.ATO WHICH IS ADDEDof>feetd) literature*Ifetorwal ^nngarianBTJ. CSINK,FORMERLY ELECTED AS ORDINARY PROFESSOR OF TECHNICAL SCIENCESAT THE PROTESTANT SCHOOL OF KESMARK.LONDON:AND N K AWILLIAMS G T E,HENRIETTA COVENT GARDEN.STREET,1853.9*4*1*'etTutus intravitaviveniaeSpem cautus, denique culpam,Non laudem merui.Horat. ad Pis.Epist.ifhen I resolved to start from the shores of life toquotidiana small of the vast a fair wind ofcross bay literary ocean,a the ofpublic opinion promised prosperous journey; noveltythe which bark carried a cordial welcomeobjects my guaranteedfrom those whose were directed after some notspy-glasses yetI have reached the andobserved flag. port, discharged mybark! route from this side of the I now firstViewing my bay,that in over its I haveshallows,perceive, my passage dangerousventured on unassisted theperilous voyage, being by experienceof navigator.any previousI have endeavoured to meet the desires of those who are inter-in either in theirested linguistic studies, increasing knowledgeinor intensive of theextensensively, seeking augmentationof that medium which minds communicate withcognition throughand hearts learn to feel from hearts and I have tried tominds , ;meet the wishes of those who felt interested in the lifepoliticalof the in a short sketch theHungarian nation, by tracing pastof the ...

Informations

Published by
Reads 34
Language English
Document size 37 MB

Exrait

A COMPLETE PRACTICAL GRAMMAR THEOF HUNGARIAN LANGUAGE, WITH SELECTIONS FROM THE BESTEXERCISES, AUTHORS, AND VOCABULARIES. ATO WHICH IS ADDED of>feetd) literature*Ifetorwal ^nngarian BT J. CSINK, FORMERLY ELECTED AS ORDINARY PROFESSOR OF TECHNICAL SCIENCES AT THE PROTESTANT SCHOOL OF KESMARK. LONDON: AND N K AWILLIAMS G T E, HENRIETTA COVENT GARDEN.STREET, 1853. 9*4*1*' etTutus intra vitaviveniaeSpem cautus, denique culpam, Non laudem merui. Horat. ad Pis. Epist. ifhen I resolved to start from the shores of life toquotidian a small of the vast a fair wind ofcross bay literary ocean, a the ofpublic opinion promised prosperous journey; novelty the which bark carried a cordial welcomeobjects my guaranteed from those whose were directed after some notspy-glasses yet I have reached the andobserved flag. port, discharged my bark! route from this side of the I now firstViewing my bay, that in over its I haveshallows,perceive, my passage dangerous ventured on unassisted theperilous voyage, being by experience of navigator.any previous I have endeavoured to meet the desires of those who are inter- in either in theirested linguistic studies, increasing knowledge inor intensive of theextensensively, seeking augmentation of that medium which minds communicate withcognition through and hearts learn to feel from hearts and I have tried tominds , ; meet the wishes of those who felt interested in the lifepolitical of the in a short sketch theHungarian nation, by tracing past of the intellectual and mental of the nation.development book is alsoAs the intended for I belearners, may allowed to make a few remarks.explanatory The Division entitled om o s i t ion s" is a,,C p purely practical in order to the student some beforeone, give previous knowledge, he the of a theGrammar; therefore,attempts study repeating more difficult and them from differentobjects , regarding points of will not be The words to thisview, thought prolix. relating are all collected in a at the end of the firstpart Vocabulary part. The Theoretical Division contains a short but Gram-complete IV mar of the The of the materialslanguage. arrangement , per- a new but it not tohaps, may appear one, is, therefore, be I chose and terms and reassumed them rejected. rejected again, I found no better I hadwhen, ones; the alternativeyet, always before me to force theeither into the scholasticallanguage or a newto venture of Grammaticalforms, partly arrangement materials in either a short or a ; being fully convinced, that, long will better than what we now in-time, give somethingPhilosophy herit from DonatllS and others. In toregard Orthography, I the established thepreferred following principles by Hungarian rather than to fluctuate driven the whims of someAcademy , by authors. I have not for the wordsgiven any orthographical rules, written as are sounded and a little atten-being they articulated, tion to the of the words when exercisespaid spelling practical are and a of the Grammaticaldone, will com-knowledge forms, for the absence of a Section onpensate Orthography. The second contains Selections in andpart prose poetry from authors whom the and the nation have crownedAcademy with As I was to consider the I couldreputation. obliged student, not choose or more difficult Theany longer literary productions. first Section of this will not be deemed insufficient thosepart by who desire detailed of the causes which influencearrangements the intellectual and mental of a nation and of thedevelopment , events these if it be considered incauses, that,produced by this the sketch had to be forced into a smallwork, very frame nor will this Section be those ; thought superfluous by of thewho seek after Grammatical for the lan-studies, learning of a nation itself excites the desire after some knowledgeguage of its intellectual life. London 1852. jr. OF THE FIRST PART.CONTENTS INTRODUCTION. Page. . 1.1. Orthophony, Orthoepy Division of the sounds and words ... 9.2. - of and articulations . 10.3. Assimilation - of the vowels 12.4. Prolongation - Contractions 13.5. COMPOSITIONS. I. Verbs. Active and Neuter . . . . 15. forms of the Substantive . .II. Possessive 27. and .III. Affixes relative to directions 37.place IV. of the Verb have" . . 43.Expression ,,to V. Attributes of Substantives 48. of the Verbal .VI. Transformation root. . 54. in Verbal formations . . . 64.VII. Irregularities 82.VIII. Participles The Verb to to beIX. keil. must 84.want, obliged, X. Future 89. Pronouns 91.IX. XII. 100.Conjunctions XIII. Adverbs 101. VI THEORY OF THE LANGUAGE. 107225.A. Grammatical Forms I. Verbs. Verbal 107.1. roots 2. 118.Conjugation 3. Derivation and of Verbs . 162.Composition II. Nominal Forms 171. 1. Characteristic of the Case . 172.Objective of the Plural2. 180. 3. Possessives Affixes 182. 4. of the different forms of aParadigma Substantive . . . . 188. and of Sub-5. Derivation Composition stantives 199. III. Attributes 204. 1. 205.Adjectives 2. Adverbs 213. IV. Pronouns 216. 1. Personal Pronouns 216. 2. Relative and Pronouns . 218.Interrogative 3. Demonstrative Pronouns 219. Definite4. Pronouns 220. 5. Indefinite Pronouns 220. V. 220.Prepositions VI. 223.Conjunctions VII. 224.Interjections B. 225279.Syntax I. Of the combination of the different Parts of the intermediation ofwithoutSpeech Grammatical forms 226. A. Of the Article a' and its 226.az, Congruent B. Of and Numerals with Sub-Adjectives stantives 229. C. Of the .... 230.and PredicateSubject D. Of other 235.Congruences