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A concert for humanity

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Ich will schauen dein Antlitz in Gerechtigkeit Johann Schelle A Concert for Humanity (bap. 1648; d. 1701) Metta Chant John T. Gates, bass Stéphane Tran Ngoc, violin This traditional Buddhist chant, given below in translation, will be sung in the Howard Niblock, oboe original Pali, a vernacular form of Sanskrit that is said to have been the native Janet Anthony, cello language of the historical Buddha and in which the earliest Buddhist scriptures were recorded. The chant takes as its subject the universal notion of metta Kathrine Handford, organ (Sanskrit maitri), or "loving kindness." It is a simple but beautiful prayer that underscores our common humanity by recognizing that, ultimately, we all seek I want to behold your countenance at the time of judgment. the same things: peace, happiness, health, wisdom, and freedom. After an I yearn to be filled with your likeness at my awakening. opening supplication to the traditional “three jewels” (the inner wisdom that links all beings, the path by which we realize that inner wisdom, and the support of Jesus, you are both God and man, and you are all my life. others similarly dedicated), the chant repeats this wish a number of times, How I long for you, who will in Heaven grant me your holiness. beginning with oneself (as how can one genuinely wish for another's happiness My soul is yearning, God, my Father, hear my cry.

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Language English
A Concert for Humanity
Metta Chant
This traditional Buddhist chant, given below in translation, will be sung in the
original Pali, a vernacular form of Sanskrit that is said to have been the native
language of the historical Buddha and in which the earliest Buddhist scriptures
were recorded. The chant takes as its subject the universal notion of
metta
(Sanskrit
maitri
), or "loving kindness." It is a simple but beautiful prayer that
underscores our common humanity by recognizing that, ultimately, we all seek
the same things: peace, happiness, health, wisdom, and freedom. After an
opening supplication to the traditional “three jewels” (the inner wisdom that links
all beings, the path by which we realize that inner wisdom, and the support of
others similarly dedicated), the chant repeats this wish a number of times,
beginning with oneself (as how can one genuinely wish for another's happiness
unless one knows it oneself) and extending ever outward to include all others: I,
you, our families, our relatives, our friends, our colleagues, those whom we find
difficult, those to whom we are indifferent, those who have passed away, those
not yet born, our pets and other creatures—in short, to all sentient beings past,
present, and future. As a meditative practice, the chant has a remarkable power
to lift us out of our own self-interest and inspire us to offer ourselves and our
achievements—modest or grand—for the benefit of others.
By our efforts in accord with the highest truth, I honor the source of wisdom.
By our efforts in accord with the highest truth, I honor the path to wisdom.
By this practice in accord with the highest truth,
I honor those who tread the path of wisdom.
May I be free from danger and enmity, may I be free from mental suffering,
May I be free from physical suffering, may I take care of myself happily.
May my father, mother, my teacher, relatives, friends, and fellow seekers,
May they be free from danger and enmity,
May they be free from mental suffering,
May they be free from physical suffering,
May they take care of themselves happily.
May the guardian spirits of this gathering, in these halls, in this place,
May the guardian spirits be free from danger and enmity, etc.
May all beings, all living things, all creatures, all individuals, all personalities,
All females, all males, all favored ones, all unfavored ones,
All deities, all humans, all those in unhappy states,
May they be free from danger and enmity, etc.
May they be free from suffering, may they enjoy safety and abundance,
And may compassionate action be their only true property.
May these wishes of ours extend to all beings everywhere.
Well spoken.
Ich will schauen dein Antlitz in Gerechtigkeit
Johann Schelle
(bap. 1648; d. 1701)
John T. Gates, bass
Stéphane Tran Ngoc, violin
Howard Niblock, oboe
Janet Anthony, cello
Kathrine Handford, organ
I want to behold your countenance at the time of judgment.
I yearn to be filled with your likeness at my awakening.
Jesus, you are both God and man, and you are all my life.
How I long for you, who will in Heaven grant me your holiness.
My soul is yearning, God, my Father, hear my cry.
For I long to see you there, face to face,
Your holy word, which I trust with all my life, assures it.
Oh, what bliss anon shall delight my soul.
Satisfy my longing and reveal yourself to me,
When for eternity I have left the world behind,
Take me soon, Jesus, and transfigure me.
Lebensstürme, Op. 144, D 947
Franz Schubert
(1797 – 1828)
Sooyeon Kwon and Anthony Padilla, piano
Psalm 23: The Lord is My Shepherd
read by Kenneth Bozeman
String Quartet in B flat, Op. 130
Ludwig van Beethoven
Cavatina
(1770 – 1827)
Stéphane Tran Ngoc, violin
Anthea Kreston, violin
Matthew Michelic, viola
Janet Anthony, cello